• Alaska's Small Scheduled Air Carriers: Economic Significance

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1995)
      The smaller Alaska based scheduled air carriers produce annual sales of about $205 million while employing nearly 2,100 Alaskans (annual average) with an annual payroll in excess of $68 million. Including Markair and Markair Express, all Alaska based scheduled air carriers produce annual sales of $415 million while employing about 3,200 with an annual payroll of $103 million. In addition to this direct effect, Alaska vendor purchases by the carriers as well as their employee spending of payroll generate sales and jobs in other businesses in the Alaska economy. The smaller air carriers generate an additional S228 million in sales, 2,200 jobs and $58 million in payroll for businesses providing goods and services to the industry and for businesses serving households with air carrier employees. Including Markair and Markair Express, all Alaska based scheduled air carriers account for 3,400 jobs and $88 million of payroll for other Alaska businesses. Total economic significance was calculated from estimated direct industry employment of 2,081, sales of $205 million, and payroll of $68 million using the ISER Input-Output model of the Alaska economy. This economic model calculates the economic activity which is stimulated in other businesses within the Alaska economy from both the purchases of the air carriers from other businesses in the state as well as from the expenditures of payroll by air carrier employees.
    • Anchorage International Airport: 1998 Economic Significance

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1998)
      This brief report updates our 1995 study, Economic Contribution of the Anchorage International Airport, which documented the airport's economic importance and described in detail the range of airport activities. Here we look primarily at growth in the number of airport-related jobs in recent years. Anchorage International Airport covers 4,700 acres and includes both domestic and international terminals and a general aviation and air taxi base around Lake Hood. Unlike airports in other U.S. cities of comparable population (about 250,000), Anchorage International Airport serves not only local households and businesses, but several other important clients: (1) international cargo carriers; (2) visitors from outside the state; and (3) visitors from other parts of Alaska. It also has a number of government and private tenants who find it either advantageous or necessary to be located at the airport.
    • Big Ticket Spending: Transfers and Labor Costs

      Gorsuch, Lee; Goldsmith, Scott; Hogan, Jay (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1990)
      This paper profiles state transfer (grant and claim) programs and labor costs (including both payroll and benefits), which together account for three of every four dollars the state spends on general operating expenses. This analysis is a complement to previous Fiscal Policy Papers in which we have examined different aspects of state government spending and revenue generation. This paper examines how the two biggest categories of spending affect the state operating budget. We conclude by looking at the implications of our analysis for declining revenues.
    • How Oil Prices Affect the Fiscal Gap

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1990)
      In this short summary based on ISER's Fiscal Policy Papers series, we estimate the timing and size of the state fiscal gap at the currently proposed $2.5 billion level of spending and at various oil prices. Findings are presented in figures and summarized.
    • Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport: Economic Significance 2000

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2001)
      Employment at the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in 2000 is estimated at 9,119 ( annual average), generating an annual payroll of $367 million. This represents about 7% of all the wage and salary jobs in Anchorage and 8% of total payroll. Adding the offsite jobs generated by airport businesses making purchases and workers spending their earnings within the community, the total economic significance of the airport grows to 14,750 jobs with a payroll of $515 million. If the airp01i were a separate community it would be the 5th largest economy in the state. The airport is about 5 times the size one would expect for a community of 260 thousand, but only partly because most of the travel between Anchorage and the rest of the US is by air. Most of the activity at the airport is associated with international air cargo, nonAlaska visitors, and non-Anchorage residents of Alaska. Together these activities at the airport, which bring new money into the economy and contribute directly to the economic base of Anchorage, account for 6,443 jobs and $259 million of payroll. Adding the off site activity generated by these onsite jobs results in a total impact of these basic activities of 10,352 jobs and $361 million of payroll. By way of comparison, the headquarters activity of the oil and gas industry in Anchorage directly employed 3,515 in 1999 with a payroll of $316 million. Viewed this way it is clear that the basic activities at the airport are an important part of the economic base of the community.