• Identifying the Potential for Cross-Fishery Spillovers: A Network Analysis of Alaskan Permitting Patterns, Working Paper, Resources for the Future

      Addicott, Ethan T.; Kroetz, Kailin; Reimer, Matthew; Sanchirico, James N.; Lew, Daniel K.; Huetteman, Justine (Resources for the Future, 2016-12-01)
      Many fishermen own a portfolio of permits across multiple fisheries, creating an opportunity for fishing effort to adjust across fisheries and enabling impacts from a policy change in one fishery to spill over into other fisheries. In regions with a large and diverse number of permits and fisheries, joint-permitting can result in a complex system, making it difficult to understand the potential for cross-fishery substitution. In this study, we construct a network representation of permit ownership to characterize interconnectedness between Alaska commercial fisheries due to cross-fishery permitting. The Alaska fisheries network is highly connected, suggesting that most fisheries are vulnerable to cross-fishery spillovers from network shocks, such as changes to policies or fish stocks. We find that fisheries with similar geographic proximity are more likely to be a part of a highly connected cluster of susceptible fisheries. We use a case study to show that preexisting network statistics can be useful for identifying the potential scope of policy-induced spillovers. Our results demonstrate that network analysis can improve our understanding of the potential for policy-induced cross-fishery spillovers.
    • The Impact of Anchorage's 2000 and 2007 Smoke-Free Policies on Select Restaurants and Bars

      Guettabi, Mouhcine; Frazier, Rosyland; Cueva, Katie; Wheeler, John; Nye, Peggy (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-01)
      The American Lung Association in Alaska (ALAA) asked the Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) to investigate the impact of the Anchorage 2000 and 2007 Clean Indoor Air (CIA) municipal ordinances on selected restaurants and bars. As previous U.S. studies have been conducted that speak to the economic and health impacts of CIA laws, ALAA also requested that ISER synthesize results of these existing studies and conduct a survey on restaurant and bar representatives’ perceptions of the impact of the ordinances.
    • The Impacts of the “Hunker Down” order in Anchorage

      Berry, Kevin (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2020-05-21)
      This brief models the COVID-19 epidemic in Anchorage Alaska to better understand the impact of the Municipality of Anchorage (MOA) “Hunker Down” order and provide insight into the potential benefit of the State of Alaska (SOA) “Stay at Home” order. The economic benefits of the hunker down order are measured in avoided mortality, based on the EPA value of a statistical life of $7.5 million. The benefits are for the epidemic to date based on confirmed cases and a simulation of an Anchorage epidemic based on epidemiological parameters from the scientific literature. Modeling suggests ~5400 deaths were avoided to date. Using a value of a statistical life of $7.5 million, the hunker down order is estimated to have avoided $40.5 billion in mortality due to COVID-19 to date. The economic costs of the shutdown are estimated based on the expected loss of GDP in Alaska, at roughly $4 billion to date. The long run economic costs are not estimated in this report, and will be heavily influenced by efforts by individuals to avoid infection. The estimates of the economic cost are also an upper bound estimate, as many of the costs may have happened regardless of the hunker down order as individuals avoided public spaces to protect themselves.
    • Implications of Oil Supply Uncertainty on a Small Oil-Producing Regional Economy

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1994)
      The state of Alaska has an economic and fiscal structure that is unique among the states. The petroleum industry, including exploration and development, production, transportation, and refining, accounts for nearly half of gross state product (the state equivalent of gross domestic product). In theory it is a simple matter to devise a rule that has the dual effects of neutralizing cycles in economic activity associated with the life cycle of petroleum exploitation and maximizing the benefits to residents from the expenditure of the petroleum wealth. Of the many complicating factors that make it difficult to devise and apply such a rule is the uncertainty regarding the size of the endowment, which is also one of the most interesting. How much it is appropriate to spend today depends directly on the size of the endowment not yet collected. This paper reviews a model for answering the public policy question of when to spend, with a special focus on how uncertainty complicates the debate. It also looks at the process of developing a plan for implementing the model within the context of the Alaska political and fiscal structure. Presented at the Second OPEC/Alaska Energy Conference in Anchorage, Alaska on May 7, 1994.
    • Improving Health Care Access for Older Alaskans: What Are the Options?

      Frazier, Rosyland; Foster, Mark A. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-06)
      This report focuses on the problem older Alaskans who rely on Medicare face getting access to primary care, and discusses some of the options policymakers are considering to resolve the problem. But older Americans across the country also report difficulty getting the primary care they need. The discussion here sheds light on the problem and potential solutions nationwide. Most Americans 65 and older use Medicare as their primary health insurance. Medicare is federal health insurance for people 65 and older, people under 65 with certain disabilities, and people of any age with end-stage renal disease—but this report looks only at access issues for Medicare beneficiaries 65 and older. Doctors don’t have to participate in the Medicare program. But those who do participate have to accept, as full payment, what Medicare pays for specific services. Many primary-care doctors say Medicare doesn’t pay them enough to cover their costs—so growing numbers are declining to see new Medicare patients. Among primary-care doctors nationwide, 61% accept new Medicare patients.1 National surveys sponsored by the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission have found that 17% of Medicare patients in the U.S. had “a big problem” finding family doctors in 2007—up from 13% in 2005.2 In Alaska, a 2008 survey by the Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) found that just over half of Alaska’s primary-care doctors were willing to treat new Medicare patients.3 The situation was worse in Anchorage, where 40% of all older Alaskans live. Only 17% of primary-care doctors in Anchorage were willing to treat new Medicare patients as of 2008 (Figure 1).4
    • Interim Evaluation: PRAXIS Preparation and Professional Development Institute

      Jester, Timothy; McDiarmid, G. Williamson (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2000)
      The primary goal of the PRAXIS Preparation and Professional Development Institute is to help Alaska Natives pass the PRAXIS exams required for teacher certification in the state. The goal of this evaluation is to provide information to the project staff on how well the Institute is achieving the goals for which it was designed. This report was prepared for the Cook Inlet Tribal Council and the Together Reaching Educational Excellence (TREE) Program.
    • ISER Alaska Input-Output Model

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1998)
      The primary purposes of the ISER Alaska input-output model are to measure the economic impact and economic importance of selected activities on the Alaska economy and to measure the economic impact of changes in the level of these activities. A related purpose is to study the structure of the Alaska economy. The input-output model can be used to conduct both economic impact analysis and economic significance analysis. For example, the model could be used to estimate the economic importance of a new ski resort in South Central Alaska. The change in final demand represented by the new resort would determine its economic impact on the region. The change in final demand would come primarily from non-resident visitors who would be attracted to Alaska to use the new resort. This working paper outlines various aspects of the model.
    • ISER Review 1994-1996

      Leask, Linda (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1996)
      Alaska has seen rapid and dramatic change since 1959, when it became a state. The Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER)-which was established in 1961-has studied that change, examining virtually all the major public policy issues along the way. This Review reports on ISER's research between 1994 and 1996. It discusses recently completed and ongoing work. Faculty and staff are profiled on page 7, and page 8 lists selected recent publications. This summary includes Fishery Studies, Social Studies, Community Studies and Economics/Fiscal Studies.
    • ISER Review 1997-2000

      Leask, Linda (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2000)
      The Institute of Social and Economic Research has studied public policy in Alaska since 1961. This review summarizes some of our recent research including Economic Projections for Alaska and the Southern Railbelt, 1999-2025 (Scott Goldsmith), : The Economic Significance of the Power Cost Equalization Program (Scott Goldsmith), Alcohol Related Homicide in Alaska Communities (Matthew Bennan, Teresa Hull, and Philip May), Seatbelt Use in Alaska (Virgene Hannah and Jack Kruse), Salmon Trap Profitability(Steve Colt), and changes inthe health, education, and safety of Alaska's children.
    • ISER Review 2000 - 2002

      Leask, Linda (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2002)
      This report provides summary information from selected research conducted by the Institute of Social and Economic Research between 2000 and 2002. This edition includes challenges to Alaska's salmon fishery, The launch of an online collection of materials on Alaska Native culture, language, and history (Alaskool.org), the economic impact of Anchorage's International Airport, land ownership in Alaska, the contribution of tourism to Alaska's economy, and many more!
    • K-12 Education Recommendations for Municipality of Anchorage

      Snyder, Elizabeth; Hahn, Micah; Lessard, Lauren; Cueva, Katie; Schwarzburg, Lisa Llewellyn; Grage, Laura; Wyck, Rebecca; Hennessy, Thomas (2020-07-21)
    • Katmai National Park and Preserve Economic Significance Analysis and Model Documentation

      Christense, Neal; Fay, Ginny (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 6/1/12)
    • Kenai National Wildlife Refuge: Economic Importance

      Hill, Alexandra; Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2000)
      The Kenai National Wildlife Refuge contributes to the borough economy primarily through tourism and seafood industries. The refuge’s lakes, mountains and forests are home to abundant animals, birds and fish. They provide sport fishing and hunting opportunities as well as a variety of non-consumptive activities such as hiking, rafting and bird watching. The refuge also contains breeding and rearing habitat for substantial salmon populations that support sport fishing both on and off the refuge as well as commercial fishing in Cook Inlet. Assessing what portion of the impact of any activity is directly attributable to the refuge is difficult. A sport angler catching salmon in Hidden Lake (on the refuge) is enjoying a resource that depended not only on refuge habitat, but also on several years of marine habitat in the Gulf of Alaska. It’s not possible to say what fraction of the dollars the angler spends in the refuge are attributable to refuge resources and what fraction to marine resources. Likewise, commercial fishers in Cook Inlet are not fishing on the refuge, but many of the fish they catch were dependent on refuge resources for spawning and rearing habitat. Since there is no ‘correct’ allocation of economic activities that depend on both refuge and off refuge resources, we analyze two different sets of activities.
    • The Kenai National Wildlife Refuge: Economic Importance, 2004

      Goldsmith, Scott; Hill, Alexandra; Dugan, Darcy (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2005)
      The Kenai National Wildlife Refuge contributes to the borough economy primarily through the tourism and seafood industries. The refuge’s lakes, mountains and forests are home to abundant animals, birds, and fish. They provide sport fishing and hunting opportunities as well as a variety of non-consumptive activities such as hiking, rafting and bird watching. The refuge also contains breeding and rearing habitat for substantial salmon populations that support sport fishing both on and off the refuge as well as commercial fishing in Cook Inlet. Three changes in the significance and impact of the refuge emerge in comparing this report with ISER’s previous estimates published in The Kenai National Wildlife Refuge: Economic Importance (May, 2000). The most striking is the continued decline in the value of Cook Inlet commercial salmon fisheries. Harvest values since 2000 are among the lowest in the last 30 years. Increased competition keeps prices low enough that even years with good returns have low total harvest values. Employment generated by commercial fishing attributable to the refuge has declined by 40 percent and income by almost 70 percent.
    • Kenai Peninsula Natural Gas Study: Final Report

      Foster, Mark; Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1995)
      A very large industrial facility such as the proposed Midrex iron ore reduction facility would make a pipeline economically feasible, but the resulting cost of gas to consumers would still be about twice the level of current Enstar rates, due to higher local distribution costs. Also, under this scenario customers along the pipeline route would not automatically have access to cheap gas unless they were clustered in groups of at least 10 people within about one mile of the connection to the main line. This study examines the economics of bringing natural gas to Homer, Seward, and intermediate points along the Sterling Highway. We conclude that natural gas delivered by pipeline to Homer or Seward from the existing Enstar system will remain uneconomical or marginally competitive with diesel under plausible assumptions about economic growth. That's because both Homer and Seward have very small numbers of customers compared to the cost of a pipeline necessary to reach either community.
    • Ketchikan Public Utilities: Electric Load Growth Study

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1998)
      Ketchikan Public Utility (KPU) asked the Institute of Social and Economic Research to project electricity sales and generation requirements in Ketchikan in the coming years. Rather than one set of projections we have estimated a range of likely future growth, given different assumptions about important factors influencing the economy and electricity use. Throughout that range of likely growth - the LOW, BASE, and HIGH cases - we project that electricity generation by KPU will temporarily drop but subsequently begin growing again, although at a slower rate than in the past.
    • Kids Count Alaska 1996

      Dinges, Norman; Lampman, Claudia; Reilly, Fay; Jackson, Genee; Kruse, Jack; Frazier, Rosyland; Larson, Eric; Atlis, Mera; Hill, Alexandra; Minton, Barbara; et al. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1996)
      Between 1990 and 1995 the total population of Alaska increased about 12 percent, growing from 550,043 to 615,900. However, the number of children (18 and under) only grew about 9 percent, from 179,939 to 196,037. So the share of children in the population dropped slightly in the first half of the 1990s, from 32.7 percent to 31.8 percent. It was slower growth in the number of White children that caused the decline; numbers of children in other ethnic groups increased faster than the general population between 1990 and 1995.
    • Kids Count Alaska 1997

      Dinges, Norman; Lampman, Claudia; Garret, Ann; Atlis, Mera; Efimova, Olga; Hill, Alexandra; Minton, Barbara (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1997)
      From 1991 through 1995, nearly 55,400 babies were born in Alaska. The overwhelming majority (89 percent) were born to mothers at least 20 years old. But that still leaves more than 6,000 babies born to teenage mothers during the first half of the 1990s. And more than a third of those babies were born to mothers under 18 years old. Teenage mothers and their children face economic disadvantages (see Births to Teens indicator), but they also face health risks. Half the youngest mothers (15 and under) and nearly four in ten older teenagers get inadequate prenatal care. Even among mothers over 20, one-quarter don’t get adequate prenatal care.About 68 percent of women who had babies in Alaska from 1991 through 1995 were White, 23 percent were Native, 4.5 percent were Black, and 4.5 percent were Asian. One quarter of mothers of all races in Alaska get inadequate prenatal care, but the share is considerably higher among Alaska Native mothers—four in ten.
    • Kids Count Alaska 1998-1999

      Dinges, Norman; Lampman, Claudia; Ragan, Shawna (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1999)
      How are Alaska’s children doing at the end of the twentieth century? Many are doing just fine—growing up healthy and safe. But others are not so fortunate. They live in poverty; they grow up without their fathers; they drop out of school; they have babies when they are children themselves. Too many—and even one is too many—die accidentally or intentionally. To help Alaska’s children, policymakers and others need reliable information about conditions affecting children. In the past decade or so, scientists have discovered that babies are born with the raw materials for brain development—about 100 million brain cells—but that most brain development happens after birth. What babies see, hear, touch, smell, and taste causes connections to form between brain cells. These connections are the wiring of the brain, allowing children to learn. Overall, scientists point out that we still have much to learn about the brain. But there is strong evidence about both the potential and the vulnerability of young children’s minds. To give children the best chance at life, adults must try to create safe, loving, interesting worlds for them.
    • Kids Count Alaska 2000

      Dinges, Norman; Lampman, Claudia; Ragan, Shawna (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2000)
      Children living in small isolated places lead much different lives from those in bigger communities on the road system. Many villages still lack adequate water and sewer systems, and some still rely on honey buckets. In the past 20 years, state and federal agencies have built sanitation systems in many rural places–but it’s an enormous and ongoing job. Part of the problem is that many areas of Alaska require specially adapted systems that are very expensive to build and operate. In this data book, we look at (1) the indicators of children’s well-being the Kids Count program uses nationwide; and (2) other measures that reflect conditions Alaskan children face—and that illustrate the sharp differences among regions of a state twice the size of the original 13 American colonies.