• Program Evaluation: Rose Urban Rural Sister School 2003

      Frazier, Rosyland; McDiarmid, G. Williamson (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2003)
      The Sister School Exchange, along with the Student Exchange and Teacher Training programs, make up the Rose Urban Rural Program. The Rose Urban Rural Program is made possible by the Alaska Humanities Forum and with funding from the U.S. Department of Education. It is intended to build understanding and a statewide sense of community by bringing urban students and teachers to rural Alaska, and rural students and teachers to urban Alaska, to learn about each other's cultures. The Sister School Exchange provides urban and rural students with an opportunity to visit each other's classrooms and communities and form a foundation for sustainable relationships. Sponsoring teachers use a curriculum, developed by the program, intended to help students understand their host community's culture and history. Urban and rural teachers and a delegation of students visit each other's schools and communities for one week.
    • Program Evaluation: Rose Urban Rural Sister School 2005

      McDiarmid, Williamson, G.; Frazier, Rosyland (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2005)
      The Rose Urban-Rural Program has a goal of annually doubling the number of urban and rural schools participating in the Sister School Exchange. In it's third year, the number of schools recruited quadrupled- exceeding the program goal- with eight urban and eight rural schools agreeing to participate in a 2004-2005 school-year exchange. The Sister School program expanded its urban locations to include Juneau, Alaska. This is the first time an urban Southeast Alaska community has been involved with the Rose Urban-Rural Exchange. Spirit Camps in rural Southeast Alaska have previously been a part of the Student and Teacher Training parts of the Rose Urban-Rural Exchange.
    • Program Evaluation: Rose Urban Rural Teacher Training 2004

      Frazier, Rosyland; McDiarmid, G. Williamson; Hill, Alexandra (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2004)
      Teacher Training, together with the Student Exchange and the Sister School Exchange, make up the Rose Urban Rural Exchange. That broad program is funded by the U.S. Department of Education and administered by the Alaska Humanities Forum. It is intended to build mutual understanding and a statewide sense of community by bringing urban students and teachers to rural Alaska-and rural students and teachers to urban Alaska-to learn about each other's cultures. Under the Teacher Training program, teachers from middle schools and high schools in urban areas participate in cultural camps sponsored by rural communities and Alaska Native organizations. These camps, many of which have been operating for more than a decade, introduce Native young people and adults to their traditions, histories, and cultures. Allowing urban teachers to share this experience is intended to help them develop a greater understanding of and respect for Alaska Native cultures and rural life.
    • Program Evaluation: Rose Urban Rural Teacher Training 2005 (Amended)

      Frazier, Rosyland; McDiarmid, Williamson, G. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2005)
      Based on successful experiences in the Student Exchange component of the Rose Urban- Rural Exchange, the Alaska Humanities Forum developed Teacher Training to give urban teachers hands-on experience in rural Alaska Native culture. In 2002, the forum began this summer program for teachers, sending middle- and high-school teachers to Alaska Native culture and spirit camps in rural Alaska. At these camps, urban teachers are exposed to Native arts and crafts, history, subsistence lifestyle, language, and dance. Also at these camps, Alaska Native elders pass on their stories and culture to young people. Teachers go through an orientation before they leave for camp, and after their return they complete lesson plans based on their experiences. These individual lesson plans are compiled in a notebook of lesson plans that are available to all Alaska teachers to help them bridge the urban-rural divide. Also, because a semester of Alaska Studies is now a statewide graduation requirement, these lesson plans constitute a valuable resource for Alaska studies courses.
    • Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Anchorage

      Goldsmith, Scott; Frazier, Rosyland (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2001)
      In the spring of 2001, the Mayor of Anchorage, George Wuerch, tasked a Kitchen Cabinet Task Force with the goal of developing recommendations to help heal racism in Anchorage. The Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) of the University of Alaska Anchorage agreed to assist the Task Force by conducting a series of focus groups in the community. The purpose of these focus groups was to obtain an assessment of attitudes and opinions about the quality of life in Anchorage from the perspective different racial groups and to solicit recommendations for improving race relations within the community....A more detailed analysis of the focus groups, based on a review of the focus group transcripts, would add more depth and detail, but we feel the main ideas identified during the focus groups are described in this report.
    • Response to Questions: Potential Effects on Alaska of Proposed Health-Care Reform Legislation

      Foster, Mark A.; Frazier, Rosyland (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-01)
      Mark Foster of Mark A. Foster and Associates (MAFA) is a consultant to ISER, and Rosyland Frazier is an ISER research associate. Both the authors have broad experience studying health-care issues in Alaska, and they have recently been looking at the problems Alaska’s Medicare patients face in getting primary-care doctors to see them. They prepared this note to respond quickly to questions from and discussions with the Office of the Governor in Washington, D.C. and Alaska’s Congressional delegation. Those questions and discussions were about the possible implications for Alaska’s Medicare patients of provisions in health-care reform legislation the U.S. Congress is considering, as well as about the broader potential effects on Alaska of the proposed legislation. This is by no means a full analysis of the many complex issues associated with health-care reform. A working paper by the same authors—examining the Medicare-access problem and related health-policy issues in more detail—will be available soon. The findings and conclusions of this note are those of the authors. If you have questions, get in touch will Rosyland Frazier at: anrrf@uaa.alaska.edu
    • Snapshot of Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance in Alaska

      Guettabi, Mouhcine; Frazier, Rosyland; Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-09)
    • Special Olympics and Alaska's Special Education Students

      McDiarmid, Williamson, G.; Frazier, Rosyland (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2003)
      The 2001 Special Olympics World Winter Games were held in Anchorage in March 2001, bringing close to 2,000 athletes with mental disabilities and more than 740 coaches from 70 countries to Alaska. As part of the planning for the 2001 winter games, the Game Organizing Committee established the Special Olympics School Enrichment Program. With funding from the U.S. Department of Education, the School Enrichment Program contracted with the Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER), at the University of Alaska Anchorage, to learn more about Alaska’s special education students. Knowing how many special education students there are in Alaska, where they live, and what their disabilities are could be quite useful to Special Olympics Alaska in its efforts to recruit more school-age athletes into local area and school programs. Also, more information about Alaska’s special education students can also help Special Olympics Alaska move toward another of its goals: bringing children with and without disabilities together in classrooms, on the playing fields, and in other activities.
    • Telehealth Business Models: An Assessment Tool for Telehealth Business Opportunities in Remote Rural Communities

      Berman, Matthew; Foster, Mark; Frazier, Rosyland (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2006)
      The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of when the potentially offsetting considerations favor telehealth investments. To that end, we provide users with a financial template to assist them with the business model question of “how is value delivered to my customer and at what cost?” – assuming that the customer(s) may include a primary care provider, a specialist, an insurance company, a health care system, the entity paying for travel, and patients. The financial template allows users to enter their site specific estimates regarding changes in referral patterns with and without telehealth and the revenues and costs that result from the changes in referral patterns. In addition, we provide a spreadsheet to enable the user to estimate the potential value of patients’ time saved by avoiding travel and the value to patients of reduced wait time in the queue for specialty care. In addition, we provide a number of illustrative business cases primarily designed to show the potential complexity of the inter-relationship of parameters and assist users with understanding how they might use the template to build business cases for their particular circumstance. We also provide several examples of sensitivity analysis to assist users with understanding how they might use the template to develop “break-even” analyses and identify when the changes in referral patterns and case mix might trigger a need for increased staff or result in longer queues.
    • Trends in Alaska's Health-Care Spending

      Frazier, Rosyland; Guettabi, Mouhcine; Passini, Jessica (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska, 2018)
      All Americans spend a lot to get health care—but Alaskans spend the most per resident, face the highest insurance premiums, and have seen overall spending grow much faster. Here we highlight some trends in Alaska’s health-care spending since the 1990s, based on existing publicly available data that allow us to compare changes in Alaska and nationwide. A chart book with much more detail is available on ISER’s website. We hope this broad information on trends in health-care spending will help Alaskans better understand what happened, consider possible reasons why, and think about potential ways to change the upward spiral.
    • Understanding Barriers to Health Insurance of Uninsured and Sporadically Insured Alaskans

      Wilson, Meghan; Hanna, Virgene; Frazier, Rosyland (2007)
      It’s no surprise that a lot of the Alaskans who don’t have health insurance say they just can’t afford it. That’s what individual Alaskans and representatives of small businesses told us, when we held focus groups in Anchorage, the Mat-Su and Kenai Peninsula boroughs, and Kodiak. But the focus groups, held from late 2006 through early 2007, did much more than just confirm what many Alaskans— and millions of other Americans—say about the costs of health insurance. We held the focus groups under contract with the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, as part of the state’s effort to learn more about the barriers a substantial number of Alaskans face in getting health-care coverage. There were 16 focus groups, attended by 89 individual Alaskans, 30 representatives of small businesses, and 5 Alaskans who sell health insurance.