Now showing items 21-40 of 225

    • The Alaska Economy And The Challenge Ahead

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 11/1/2015)
    • Unlocking our Petroleum Wealth Potential: A Game Plan for Meeting Alaska's Fiscal Challenge

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/1/2015)
    • Migration and Oil Industry Employment of North Slope Alaska Natives

      Marshall, David (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1/1/1993)
    • The Alaska Economy And The Challenge Ahead

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 11/1/2015)
    • Unlocking our Petroleum Wealth Potential: A Game Plan for Meeting Alaska's Fiscal Challenge

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/1/2015)
    • Short-Run Economic Impacts of Alaska Fiscal Options

      Knapp, Funnar; Guettabi, Mouhcne; Berman, Matthew (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3/1/2016)
    • Webnote 21. The Growing Number of Alaska Children in Foster Care, 2011-2015

      Passini, Jessica; Vadapalli, Diwakar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3/1/2016)
    • Repeat Maltreatment in Alaska: Assessment and Exploration of Alternative Measures

      Passini, Jessica; Vadapalli, Diwakar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/1/2015)
    • 2016 Alaska's Construction Spending Forecast

      Cravez, Pamela; Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1/1/2016)
    • The Allocation of Time and Risk of Lyme: A Case of Ecosystem Service Income and Substitution Effects

      Berry, Kevin; Bayham, Jude; Meyer, Spencer; Fenichel, Eli (Springer, 4/13/2017)
      Forests are often touted for their ecosystem services, including outdoor recreation. Historically forests were a source of danger and were avoided. Forests continue to be reservoirs for infectious diseases and their vectors�a disservice. We examine how this disservice undermines the potential recreational services by measuring the human response to environmental risk using exogenous variation in the risk of contracting Lyme Disease. We find evidence that individuals substitute away from spending time outdoors when there is greater risk of Lyme Disease infection. On average individuals spent 1.54 fewer minutes per day outdoors at the average, 72 U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, confirmed cases of Lyme Disease. We estimate lost outdoor recreation of 9.41 h per year per person in an average county in the Northeastern United States and an aggregate welfare loss on the order $2.8 billion to $5.0 billion per year.
    • 2017 Alaska's Construction Spending Forecast

      Cravez, Pamela; Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1/1/2017)
    • Economic Impact of UAA

      Goldsmith, Scott (3/1/2012)
    • Growing Minds and Strengthening Communities: An Economic Valuation Study of the Anchorage Public Library

      Ralph, Kelsey (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 6/1/2008)
    • Alaska's Economy and Housing Market

      Goldsmith, Scott; Berman, Matthew; Huskey, Lee; Leask, Linda; Hull, Teresa (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/1/1986)
    • Adapting to Environmental and Social Change: Subsistence in Three Aleutian Communities

      Schmidt, Jennifer; Berman, Matt (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 4/19/2018)
    • Economic Effects of Climate Change in Alaska

      Berman, Matthew; Schmidt, Jennifer (American Meteorological Society (AMS), 11/27/2018)
      We summarize the potential nature and scope of economic effects of climate change in Alaska that have already occurred and are likely to become manifest over the next 30-50 years. We classified potential effects discussed in the literature into categories according to climate driver, type of environmental service affected, certainty and timing of the effects, and potential magnitude of economic consequences. We then described the nature of important economic effects, and provided estimates of larger, more certain effects for which data were available. Largest economic effects were associated with costs to prevent damage, relocate, and replace infrastructure threatened by permafrost thaw, sea level rise, and coastal erosion. The costs to infrastructure were offset by a large projected reduction in space heating costs attributable to milder winters. Overall, we estimated that five, relatively certain, large effects that could be readily quantified would impose an annual net cost of $340-$700 million, or 0.6 to 1.3 percent of Alaska GDP. This significant, but relatively modest net economic effect for Alaska as a whole obscures large regional disparities, as rural communities face large projected costs while more southerly urban residents experience net gains.
    • A simple decomposition of Alaska's labor force participation rate

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 11/25/2019)
      In Alaska, similar to the rest of the country, the share of people working or seeking employment started declining in the early 2000's. The implications for lower labor force participation rates are numerous and have consequences on the tax base, government revenues, and economic growth. From 2000 to 2010, we find Alaska's labor force declined from 73.5 to 69.6% with more than 90% of the decline attributed to demographic shifts. From 2010 to 2018, the labor force participate rate went from 69.6 to 65% but the reasons for the decline were due to both behavioral adjustments (44.6%) and demographic shifts (55.3%). Lastly, we show that using the unemployment rate as a metric of the economy's health during times of significant labor force change can be misleading.
    • 2019 Alaska's Construction Spending Forecast

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2/6/2019)
    • Economic Impacts of the Vetoes on the Alaska Economy

      Guettabi, Mouhcine; Klouda, Nolan (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 7/8/2019)
      On June 28, 2019 Governor Mike Dunleavy announced line-item vetoes totaling $409 million from the State of Alaska budget for Fiscal Year 2020. These vetoes include significant cuts to the University of Alaska, Medicaid, payments to local governments, public assistance programs, state personnel headcounts, and numerous other categories. The full consequences of these cuts on the state economy, fiscal health, population, and policy outcomes will take years to develop. In this paper, we provide the short term impacts of the cuts, how they interact with the current state of the economy, and a descriptive outlook of the some of the future effects. We find the cuts will result in more than 4,000 jobs lost in the short run and will therefore return the Alaska economy into recession. While the short term losses represent a considerable negative shock to the economy, the consequences of these cuts on long term development could be even more pronounced.
    • Analysis of Bike to Work Day Cyclist Counts and Participant Survey

      Berry, Kevin (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 9/1/2019)