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dc.contributor.authorFay, Ginny
dc.contributor.authorMeléndez, Alejandra Villalobos
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-03T23:58:08Z
dc.date.available2014-06-03T23:58:08Z
dc.date.issued2014-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/3779
dc.description.abstractYou might think Alaskans are using more electricity at home now than they did in 1980, since many live in bigger houses, own more appliances, and have computers and other electronics that were rare 30 years ago. But you’d be wrong: per person residential use of electricity is actually a bit lower today—probably due to a combination of more efficient appliances and increased conservation, as energy prices rose. What did jump sharply was commercial and industrial use per person, reflecting the major economic growth that in recent decades has made Alaska’s economy far bigger and more diverse. This summary shows changes over time in use of electricity in Alaska and describes the current picture, including use by region and sources of electricity—especially renewable sources.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherInstitute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorageen_US
dc.titleElectricity in Alaska: A Growing and Changing Pictureen_US
dc.title.alternativeResearch Summary No. 75en_US
dc.typeReporten_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-12T01:10:31Z


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