• Distribution, Growth And Egg Production Of Euphausiids In The Northern Gulf Of Alaska

      Pinchuk, Alexei I.; Hopcroft, Russell (2006)
      The euphausiids Thysanoessa inermis, Thysanoessa spinifera and Euphausia pacifica are key pelagic grazers and important prey for many vertebrates in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This thesis provides the first account of distribution, egg production, growth, development, and temporal variability in abundance of the euphausiids in relation to environmental variations in the northern GOA. T. inermis and T spinifera were abundant on the shelf within 120-130 km from the coast, while E. pacifica originated from offshore and was advected onto the shelf during summer. E. pacifica produced multiple broods with brood size strongly related to ambient chlorophyll a concentrations. In contrast, T. inermis released eggs once in the season and its brood size did not depend on chlorophyll content. Early development of these species showed a remarkably similar response to changes in temperature. The highest molting increments were observed during the spring phytoplankton bloom for T. inermis, and in summer for T. spinifera and E. pacifica, suggesting coupling with food availability. The molting rates were strongly influenced by temperature. Growth rates depended on euphausiid size, and were close to 0 in early spring, reaching maximum values in May (0.123 mm d-1 or 0.023 d -1 for T. inermis) and July (0.091 mm d-1 or 0.031 d-1 for T. spinifera). The growth rates for E. pacifica remained below 0.07 mm d -1 (0.016 d-1) throughout the season. The relationship between T. inermis weight specific growth rate (adjusted to 5�C) and ambient chlorophyll-a concentration fit a Michaelis-Menten curve (r2=0.48), but such relationships were not significant for T. spinifera or E. pacifica. Reproduction of T. inermis occurred during April in 1998 and 2003, and was extended through May in 1999-2002. The spawning of T. inermis and T. spinifera was related to the spring diatom bloom on the inner shelf, while the spawning of E. pacifica occurred later in season, when the water temperature increased. A strong increase in abundance of T. inermis, associated with the extended colder phase in the North Pacific, indicates that progressive cooling in 1999-2002 may have resulted in greater reproductive success of early spawning T. inermis on the inner shelf.