• Assessment And Prediction Of Potentially Mineralizable Organic Nitrogen For Subarctic Alaska Soils

      Zhao, Aiqin; Zhang, Mingchu (2011)
      The objective of this study was to identify a rapid laboratory technique to predict potentially mineralizable organic N for subarctic Alaska soils. Soil samples were taken from major agricultural area of subarctic Alaska. Laboratory incubation followed by kinetic model fit was first used to select a best model to estimate potential soil N mineralization. By correlating the model estimated organic N pool sizes and different chemical extracted organic N, I then found the best chemical method to estimate soil potentially mineralizable N. Spectroscopic properties of water extractable organic matter were also determined and correlated with model estimated organic N pool sizes in order to improve the estimation of soil mineralizable N pool. Finally, the best chemical method and spectroscopic property were used in the selected best kinetic model for the prediction of soil N mineralization in field incubation. Model comparisons showed that models with fixed rate constants were better than that the ones with rate constants estimated from simulation. Among models with fixed rate constants, fixed double exponential model was best. This model differentiated active mineralizable organic N pool with a fixed rate constant of 0.693 week-1 and slow mineralizable organic N pool with a fixed rate constant of 0.051 week-1. By correlating model estimated organic N pool size and chemical extracted organic N amount, I found that the potentially mineralizable organic N size was closely correlated with hot (80 �C) water extractable organic N or 1 M NaOH hydrolysable organic N. By correlating model estimated organic N size and spectroscopic characteristics of water extractable organic matter, I found that the active mineralizable organic N pool was correlated with humification index in cold (22 �C) water extraction (R 2=0.89, p<0.05), which indicates that characterizing extracted organic matter was a useful tool to improve the estimation of soil organic N pools. In summary, potential mineralizable organic N in soils from subarctic Alaska can be estimated by hot water extractable organic matter or 1 M NaOH hydrolysable organic N, which accounted for 70% and 63% of the variation in potentially mineralizable organic N, respectively. This approach will provide fundamental insight for farmers to manage N fertilizer application in agricultural land and also provide some basic information for ecologists on predicting N release from Alaska soil that can be used for assessing the N impact on ecosystem.
    • Hydrologic Controls On Carbon Cycling In Alaskan Coastal Temperate Rainforest Soils

      D'Amore, David V.; David, Valentine, (2011)
      The northern perhumid North American Pacific coastal temperate rainforest (NCTR) extends along the coastal margin of British Columbia and southeast Alaska and has some of the densest carbon stocks in the world. Northern temperate ecosystems such as the NCTR play an important role in the global balance of carbon flows between atmospheric and terrestrial pools. However, there is little information on key components of the forest carbon budget in this region. Specifically, the large pool of soluble carbon that is transferred from soils via streamwater as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) certainly plays a role in the total carbon balance in wet forests such as the NCTR. In order to address this information gap, I applied the concept of hydropedology to define functional landscape units based on soil type to quantify soil carbon fluxes and apply these estimates to a conceptual model for determining the carbon balance in three NCTR watersheds. The strong hydrologic gradient among ecosystems served as a template for constructing a conceptual design and approach for constraining carbon budget estimates in the watersheds. Replicated hydropedologic units were identified in three classes: sloping bogs, forested wetlands, and uplands. Estimates of annual soil respiration and DOC fluxes from the hydropedologic types were obtained through seasonal measurements combined with temperature-dependent models. Soil respiration fluxes varied significantly across the hydrologic gradient where soil respiration was 78, 178, and 235 g CO2 m -2 y-1 in sloping bogs, forested wetlands and uplands respectively. Average DOC flux was 7.7, 30.3, to 33.0 g C m-2 y-1 in sloping bog, forested wetland, and upland sites respectively. Estimates of carbon efflux from the terrestrial ecosystem was combined with values of net primary productivity from remote sensing to determine net ecosystem production (NEP). The average NEP estimated in three NCTR watersheds was 2.0 +/- 0.8 Mg C ha-1. Carbon loss as DOC was 10--30% of the total carbon flux from the watersheds confirming the importance of this vector of carbon loss in the NCTR. The watershed estimates indicate that forests of the NCTR serve as a carbon sinks consistent with the average worldwide rate of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems.
    • Mechanisms Of Soil Carbon Stabilization In Black Spruce Forests Of Interior Alaska: Soil Temperature, Soil Water, And Wildfire

      Kane, Evan S.; Valentine, David (2006)
      The likely direction of change in soil organic carbon (SOC) in the boreal forest biome, which harbors roughly 22% of the global soil carbon pool, is of marked concern because climate warming is projected to be greatest in high latitudes and temperature is the cardinal determinant of soil C mineralization. Moreover, the majority of boreal forest SOC is harbored in surficial organic horizons which are the most susceptible to consumption in wildfire. This research focuses on mechanisms of soil C accumulation in recently burned (2004) and unburned (~1850-1950) black spruce (Picea mariana [Mill.] BSP) forests along gradients in stand productivity and soil temperature. The primary research questions in these three chapters address: (1) how the interaction between stand production and temperature effect the stabilization of C throughout the soil profile, (2) the quantity and composition of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) as it is leached from the soil across gradients in productivity and climate, and (3) physiographic controls on organic matter consumption in wildfire and the legacy of wildfire in stable C formation (pyrogenic C, or black carbon). Soil WSOC concentrations increased while SOC stocks decreased with increasing soil temperature and stand production along the gradients studied. Stocks of BC were minuscule in comparison to organic horizon SOC stocks, and therefore the C stabilizing effect of wildfire was small in comparison to SOC accumulation through arrested decomposition. We conclude that C stocks are likely to be more vulnerable to burning as soil C stocks decline relative to C sequestered in aboveground woody tissues in a warmer climate. These findings contribute to refining estimates of potential changes in boreal soil C stocks in the context of a changing climate.
    • Soil Fertility And Corn And Soybean Yield And Quality In A Six-Year Nitrogen And Phosphorus Fertilization Experiment

      Anthony, Peter M.; Sparrow, Stephen; Malzer, Gary; David, Valentine,; Zhang, Mingcho (2012)
      Optimum management of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilizers for corn [Zea mays L.] and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] production requires quantitative understanding of multiple soil processes and crop responses, including supply and immobilization of N and P by soil, the response of yield and quality to nutrient availability, and the relationships and interactions between N and P cycling, crop response, and other soil physical and chemical variables. We conducted a six-year experiment on two 16-ha fields on glacial-till soils in south-central Minnesota. In each year of a corn--soybean rotation, we measured soil physical and chemical parameters and grain yield and quality at a 0.014-ha resolution within each field. These observations coincided with placement of a randomized complete block, split plot design of N and P fertilizer treatments. Spatial patterns of mineralizable N were consistent over time. Mineralizable N was highly correlated to soil nitrate at a well-drained site, but not at a poorly-drained site. Increases in available soil P per kg of net P addition were significantly related to soil pH. Within fields, spatial patterns of soybean yields were highly correlated across years, and we observed consistent relationships between yield and soil variables. Overall, soybean yield related positively to soil P and Zn and negatively to pH at all site-years. Quadratic-plateau regression models of soybean yield in relation to soil P and Zn indicate that in high pH soils at these sites, yield is optimized when soil P and Zn levels are higher than current recommendations. Corn yields responded significantly to N rate and N rate by P rate interaction in all site-years. Whole-field economic optimum N rate differed significantly by site-year and by P treatment at some site-years. Site-specific P fertilization should account for spatial variation in soil P buffering capacity. Nitrogen mineralization and NxP nutrient interactions should be accounted for in agronomic management decisions for corn production. The consistent influence of soil pH on nutrient cycling and crop response indicates the potential benefit to amelioration of high pH in calcareous glacial-till soils. Results highlight the significance of spatial variability in nutrient cycling to crop management.