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dc.contributor.authorBuurman, Helena
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-09T17:44:34Z
dc.date.available2014-10-09T17:44:34Z
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/4440
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2013
dc.description.abstractI examine the many facets of volcano seismicity in Alaska: from the short-lived eruption seismicity that is limited to only the few weeks during which a volcano is active, to the seismicity that occurs in the months following an eruption, and finally to the longterm volcano seismicity that occurs in the years in which volcanoes are dormant. I use the rich seismic dataset that was recorded during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano to examine eruptive volcano seismicity. I show that the progression of magma through the conduit system at Redoubt could be readily tracked by the seismicity. Many of my interpretations benefited greatly from the numerous other datasets collected during the eruption. Rarely was there volcanic activity that did not manifest itself in some way seismically, however, resulting in a remarkably complete chronology within the seismic record of the 2009 eruption. I also use the Redoubt seismic dataset to study post-eruptive seismicity. During the year following the eruption there were a number of unexplained bursts of shallow seismicity that did not culminate in eruptive activity despite closely mirroring seismic signals that had preceded explosions less than a year prior. I show that these episodes of shallow seismicity were in fact related to volcanic processes much deeper in the volcanic edifice by demonstrating that earthquakes that were related to magmatic activity during the eruption were also present during the renewed shallow unrest. These results show that magmatic processes can continue for many months after eruptions end, suggesting that volcanoes can stay active for much longer than previously thought. In the final chapter I characterize volcanic earthquakes on a much broader scale by analyzing a decade of continuous seismic data across 46 volcanoes in the Aleutian arc to search for regional-scale trends in volcano seismicity. I find that volcanic earthquakes below 20 km depth are much more common in the central region of the arc than they are in the eastern and western regions. I tie these observations to trends in magma geochemistry and regional tectonic features, and present two hypotheses to explain what could control volcanism in the Aleutian arc.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleVolcano Seismicity in Alaskaen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.degreephd
dc.identifier.departmentDepartment of Geology and Geophysicsen_US
dc.contributor.chairWest, Michael
dc.contributor.committeeFreymueller, Jeffrey
dc.contributor.committeePrejean, Stephanie
dc.contributor.committeeThompson, Glenn
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-20T01:24:00Z


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