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dc.contributor.authorJones, Benjamin M.
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-10T19:59:33Z
dc.date.available2014-10-10T19:59:33Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/4464
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2013
dc.description.abstractAmplified warming in the Arctic has likely increased the rate of landscape change and disturbances in northern high latitude regions. Remote sensing provides a valuable tool for assessing the spatial and temporal patterns associated with arctic landscape dynamics over annual, decadal, and centennial time scales. In this dissertation, I focused on remote sensing studies associated with four primary components of arctic landscape change and disturbance: (1) permafrost coastline erosion, (2) thermokarst lake dynamics, (3) tundra fires, and (4) using repeat airborne LiDAR for the measurement of vertical deformation in an arctic coastal lowland landscape. By combining observations from several high resolution satellite images for a 9 km segment of the Beaufort Sea Coast between 2008 and 2012, I demonstrated that the report of heightened erosion at the beginning of the 2000s was equaled or exceeded in every year except 2010 and that the mean annual erosion rate was tightly coupled to the number of open water days and the number of storms. By combining historical aerial photographs from the 1950s and 1980s with recent high-resolution satellite imagery from the mid-2000s, I assessed the expansion and drainage of thermokarst lakes on the northern Seward Peninsula. I found that more than half of the lakes in the study area were expanding as a result of permafrost degradation along their margins but that the rate of expansion was fairly consistent (0.35 and 0.39 m/yr) between the 1950s and 1980s and 1980s and mid-2000s, respectively. However, it appeared that in a number of instances that expansion of lakes led to the lateral drainage and that over the 55-year study period the total lake area decreased by 24%. While these studies highlight the utility of quantifying disturbance during the remotely sensed image archive period (~1950s to present) they are inherently limited temporally. Thus, I also demonstrated techniques in which field studies and remote sensing data could be combined to extend the identification of landscape disturbance events that occurred prior to the remote sensing archive. I identified two large regions indicative of past disturbance caused by tundra fires on the North Slope of Alaska, which doubled the delineated area of tundra fire disturbance on the North Slope over the last 100 to 130 years. I conclude the dissertation by demonstrating the utility of repeat airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data for arctic landscape change studies, in particular vertical surface deformation, and provide momentum for going forward with this emerging technology for remote sensing of arctic landscape dynamics. The quantification of arctic landscape dynamics during and prior to the remote sensing archive is important for ongoing monitoring and modeling efforts of the positive and negative feedbacks associated with amplified Arctic climate change.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRemote Sensing of Arctic Landscape Dynamicsen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.degreephd
dc.identifier.departmentDepartment of Geology and Geophysicsen_US
dc.contributor.chairGrosse, Guido
dc.contributor.committeeArp, Christopher
dc.contributor.committeeMann, Daniel
dc.contributor.committeeRomanovsky, Vladimir
dc.contributor.committeeVerbyla, David
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-20T01:28:29Z


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