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dc.contributor.authorHealy, Joanne
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-25T00:29:43Z
dc.date.available2014-10-25T00:29:43Z
dc.date.issued2014-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/4559
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2014
dc.description.abstractTwo studies related to student attention, posture, school ergonomics, student behavior (leaning, standing up, and moving), and learning engagement were conducted in Alaska. The Children's Postural Improvement Study (CPIS) looked at the observable effects of two interventions on attention. In the Classroom Environmental Study (CES) a baseline ergonomic survey compared observed student behavior and classroom arrangements. The purpose of the CPIS was to investigate the effects of a postural education program, consisting of five 30-minute instructional sessions, as compared to a nutritional intervention at two elementary schools and its effect on attention. Three quantitative tools measured attention, the post-Partial Vanderbilt ADHD Teacher and Parent rating scales and pre- and post-math fluency tests. Qualitative measures included pre- and postintervention photographs, daily comments from students after the lesson, and post open-ended-question student and teacher surveys. Based on the post-surveys, participants valued their good posture and made concentrated efforts to improve it. Quantitative results of this postural study revealed no correlation between posture and attention. The follow-up CES examined the current state of furniture in 78 classrooms and pedagogical practices in regard to student movement and learning engagement in eight fourth-grade classrooms in three elementary schools. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant school effect for leaning and significant classroom nested within school effects for leaning, standing up, and moving. Classroom sketches were coded to examine movement and posture. No significant difference for desk clusters by grade, or by school using the Chi-squared test were found, but there was a significant difference comparing the seating relationship to instructional delivery by grade and by school. Recommendations for future research and changes within Schools of Education and school districts to improve posture and learning engagement include: adjust current students' chairs and desks to meet their ergonomic needs; raise awareness of and inform pre-service, current teachers, students, and parents about ergonomic health concepts; encourage teachers to move around the classroom while instructing to engage students as they track the teacher's movement; and limit instructional periods to 20 minutes or less to allow for student movement breaks.
dc.titleObservable effects of attention, posture, ergonomics and movement in the classroom
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.degreephd
dc.identifier.departmentDepartment of Biology and Wildlife
dc.contributor.chairBult-Ito, Abel
dc.contributor.committeeAnahita, Sine
dc.contributor.committeeCharles, Walkie
dc.contributor.committeeIrish, Joel
dc.contributor.committeeKaden, Ute
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-05T09:14:23Z


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