• Teaching adolescents conflict management skills

      DeLong, Debra M. (2011-05)
      In response to a parents request a workshop to teach a conflict management workshop to high school students was created. A pre-post test design to assess the effectiveness of the workshop was used, with the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument as the measurement. Responses were available for 76 students who were evenly divided between females and males. Overall preferences for using conflict styles did not show a statistically significant change; however, preferences for individual styles did change, with competition showing a statistically significant difference.
    • Teaching conflict management: active and traditional learning approaches in a group communication course

      Welborn, Rhonda D. (2007-05)
      The vital role of effective groups within modern organizations requires attention to the dynamics of group communication, specifically conflict management. The first context in which most individuals learn group communication skills is in the university classroom. Sims (2006) asserts that the established literature examining approaches to teaching has convinced most scholars that the student's classroom experience must advance beyond the traditional lecture format, to more interactive student involvement. This study investigated the hypothesis that active learning would result in higher perceptions of self-efficacy in students' group conflict management than would traditional lecture instruction. This study also explores issues associated with differences in instructional methods, as well as change in self-efficacy across time periods. University students in a group communication course who received either active learning or lecture based instruction in group conflict management voluntarily completed a conflict communication self-efficacy measure, and two conflict management measures. The analyses indicated that self-efficacy did increase significantly across time periods, however, no evidence was found of a difference between instructional methods. Measurement issues, the importance of a manipulation check, implications of the findings, and suggestions for future research are discussed.
    • TEST College of Rural and Community Development 9/25/17

      CHISUM (2017-09)
      TEST College of Rural and Community Development 9/25/17
    • The reconstructed self: understanding the private and public identity of a mother of a child with autism

      Tessen, Danielle Rene'e; Richey, Jean A.; Imbler, Ross M.; Taylor, Karen M. (2014-05)
      The puzzle pattern of the autism awareness ribbon signifies the mystery of life on the spectrum. The spectrum is characterized by the wide range of possible diagnoses of autism. One family out of every 68 is affected by autism. Each shape and color of the puzzle illustrates the diversity of experience for each family and person living with autism. Therefore, the people living the everyday life of autism provide an insightful understanding of how the puzzle pieces fit together. The central focus of this research was the lived experience of the interviewees. Nine mothers of children diagnosed with autism were interviewed. Five themes emerged once the interviews were conducted: (a) public scrutiny, (b) family and friend responses, (c) mother versus society, (d) guilt and stress, and (e) advocacy and networking. Each of these themes represents the stories of mothers who live with children on the spectrum. Each story shared provides the reader with a deeper understanding of mothers' experiences who live with children on the spectrum.
    • Through the looking glass: constructing sexual identity

      Foore, Kimberly Ann (2004-05)
      The present research explored how contemporary women define their sexual identity and communicate their needs/wants for sexual gratification during the act of sexual intimacy. Using human science epistemology, methodology, and methods, eight women's narratives were co-constructed into two emergent themes: Defining sexuality as self-stereotyping identity and Setting the stage for uncertainty as mask. This research explored the unique definitions of sexuality from the co-researchers perspective and ultimately determined that sexual identity is inextricably bound to self-presentation and impression management. It was also discovered that these women communicate their sexual needs nonverbally and 'hide' behind a mask of uncertainty out of a culturally developed fear of being judged and/or labeled negatively for being too sexually experienced.
    • Touristic encounters of an intercultural kind: communication between volunteers and international visitors at a visitors information center

      Peterson, Sherrill Lea (2004-05)
      This qualitative research examined the lived experience of volunteers in providing information to international travelers at a Visitors Information Center. The research focused on intercultural communication during these touristic encounters. Interpersonal communication and meaning engagement practices between volunteer information providers and international visitors were examined from a narrative theoretical perspective. Narratives of six volunteer information providers were gathered using conversational interviews and analyzed using the method of thematic analysis. Six themes emerged from volunteers' narratives of their experience: independent/package tour travelers, visitors' expectations, information as product/process, foreign language skills, adaptability and accommodation, and public inebriation of homeless local residents. Contrary to expectations, volunteers reported that the experience of providing information for international visitors was very little different from providing information to visitors with cultural patterns of communication similar to their own. Several explanations are offered for the apparent absence of difficulties in providing information to international visitors. The surprising finding warrants further research.
    • Understanding the lived experience of racist hate speech on American university campuses

      Matusitz, Jonathan Andre (2001-12)
      This research employs narrative methodology in order to understand the lived experience of students who have experienced racist racist hate speech on American university campuses. Thematic analysis of in-depth, conversational interview capta (Kvale, 1996) was used to find commonalities in co-researchers' experiences. The literature review includes a contextual and historical section on racism, and a detailed, standard definition of racist hate speech. Emergent themes from these narrative interviews were found in regard to victims' experiences of racist hate speech on American university campuses. Those themes are discussed in the order of the co-researchers' experience: (1) indignation and anger, (2) stereotyping, (3) ethnic resentment, and (4) ethnic superiority. The co-researchers' experiences illustrate that racist hate speech is not only talk, but can be experienced through other communicative actions.
    • Voices from the third shift: advocate/caregiver perceptions of effective communication in medical encounters

      Babers-M., Terri (2003-09)
      A review of related literature, together with experiential understandings of the author, indicates that interpersonal communication in medical encounters is often triadic rather than dyadic in nature. The central interest of this research is to understand what commonalities of lived experience exist for women who act as advocate/caregivers communicating in medical encounters. The distinction of this study is that the focus is on the socially constructed, lived-experiences of the advocate/caregiver and her understandings of communication effectiveness in interpersonal communication in the medical encounter, rather than on the needs, responsibilities, and competencies of either the provider or the patient. A qualitative research design was used for this study. It consisted of two concept-rich, self-contained focus group conversation/interviews with female caregivers who are employed full, time and who serve in medical encounters as advocates for the family members for whom they care in the home. From an interpretive perspective, this study investigates the socially constructed perceptions, revealed in narratives told in focus group conversations, of advocate/caregivers about their communication experiences as advocates for a patient in medical encounters and what co-constructions of communicative reality they understand to be essential to their perceptions that communication has been effective.
    • We need to talk and the nation is watching: a textual analysis of drug interventions

      Denhalter, Bailey J.; Richey, Jean; Sager, Kevin; Taylor, Karen (2012-05)
      Addiction is something that millions of people struggle with. Many are unable to or do not realize that they have a problem. Previously kept as an embarrassing family secret, drug interventions have gone Hollywood. The entertainment industry began publicizing these once private affairs for the nation in the early 2000's; unfortunately, publicity does not ensure a problem will be addressed in the appropriate manner. Drug interventions are typically conducted in secret, away from the prying eyes of neighbors or community members. By a stroke of genius or insanity, the producers at A & E realized the American public's fascination with the dark underbelly of society and televised the taboo phenomenon of interventions. The purpose of this qualitative study is to identify emergent themes through the comparison and textual analysis of multiple episodes of A & E Television Networks series Intervention, focusing on family participation in illicit drug interventions. These televised interventions offer a rare and unique glimpse into the processes and consequences for those involved. The viewer is given the opportunity to observe the effects an intervention may have on the family unit, as well as on individuals.
    • Well-being: the looking glass in 4-D

      Bays, Joey M.; Richey, Jean; Arundale, Robert; Anahita, Sine (2011-05)
      Well-being affects all of us. It is intricately interwoven with our identity and interactions. This study explores the relational contexts in which well-being is created, maintained, and diminished. In order to accomplish this goal, three main themes were addressed: (a) the co-researcher's understanding of what well-being is, (b) the co-researcher's understanding of how community affects a person's well-being, and (c) a description of the co-researcher's best of times and worst of times. These phenomenological themes guide the context and process of this research. This study is grounded in the theoretical stance of interpretivism with a constructionism epistemology; the methodology employed is phenomenological research utilizing conversational interviewing methods. I thematically analyzed the emergent capta from the interviews into the following themes: (a) What is Well-Being?: a definition of well-being and (b) The Struggle in the Search: co-researchers lived experiences of wellness. These themes offer an in-depth exploration of understanding the meaning of well-being the lived experiences informing those understandings.
    • Who Is In Charge Here? A Feminist Communicology Of Followership And Leadership In An Academic Organization

      Jordan, Robert Locke; McWherter, Pamela (2008)
      This feminist critical study explicates the ways that followership is conceptualized at an academic organization in the Pacific Northwest. Through the use of qualitative methods, stories were solicited providing descriptions of events that define the hegemonically masculine ways that followership is conceptualized, suggesting the need for a feminist critical analysis and revisioning. A number of themes emerged from conversational interviews including: conceptual verisimilitude, archetypes of leadership, alternative conceptions of followership, the role of action in leadership and followership, and the emergent organization. The capta gathered from this qualitative study suggest a revisioning of human organization and recognizes leadership and followership as existing in a reciprocally defining communicative relationship. Leadership and followership are found to be constructed in an existential exchange addressing a specific need within an organization and its immediate requirements. When viewed from this communicative perspective organizational members come to develop a more sophisticated, relational, and dialectic understanding of the construction of leadership and followership.
    • Women at work: perceptions of appearance, power, and negative communication

      Wall, Amanda Ilene (2005-05)
      This study is an attempt to understand the professional relationships among women. The purpose of this research was to explore the relationship between female self-concept and female-female negative communication in the workplace. Specifically the effects of self-esteem, communication behaviors, and perception of power on professional females in the workforce were examined. Females in varying levels of professional positions were asked to respond to a set of statements regarding their own perceived level of self-esteem, power artifacts, and negative communication behaviors. The data were then analyzed to determine if a correlation exists between female age and level of self-esteem, the relation self-esteem has to negative communication behaviors, and to measure the frequency that females report exhibiting, experiencing, and witnessing negative communication behaviors in the workplace. Results of this study lead to several implications regarding the connection between self-esteem, negative communication behaviors, power artifacts, and age. First, these data suggests that addressing women's self-esteem in the workplace can have a positive effect on the workplace environment. Next, by mentoring younger women to be more confident at work, they are less likely to exhibit negative communication behaviors. The third key conclusion connects the effects that power artifacts, such as extravagant vacations, expensive jewelry, a college or graduate degree, and fancy cars have on other women. It is apparent that these artifacts are a point of contention for women.
    • Women In Alaska Constructing The Recovered Self: A Narrative Approach To Understanding Long -Term Recovery From Alcohol Dependence And /Or Abuse

      Richey, Jean Alice; Brown, Jin G. (2003)
      Autobiographical narratives are explored in a qualitative approach regarding women in Alaska who have been successful in long-term recovery from alcohol dependence and/or abuse. The literature review includes an integrative approach to theoretical perspectives from the disciplines of Human Communication, Anthropology, and Psychology. The epistemological orientation of Constructionism grounds this study, as well as provides a framework for theoretical understandings from the narrative co-construction of self-identity, gender studies, health belief and health behavior change models, anthropological views on alcohol and culture including Native American and Alaska Native approaches, and various psychological and transpersonal strategies for overcoming alcohol addiction. Today, a diverse resource of recovery paradigms and tools are available to women who have problems with alcohol. As a result, this study explores the applicability of various methods of recovery as they occur in the real lives of women in Alaska. Two emergent themes of recovery derived from nine narrative interviews are discussed in regard to identity reconstruction: (1) Survivorship and (2) the Transcendent Self. The emergent themes represent the reconstructed constitutive interpretations of a woman's self-identity as the recovered self. The process of recovery from alcohol dependence and/or abuse constitutes a uniquely personal and culturally specific journey for women. A recovered lifestyle is a completely different way of being for the woman who had previously been immersed in a culture of alcohol addiction---she now must construct a healthy self. A woman's process of recovery from alcohol addiction cannot be separated from the world of social/cultural/gender interactions in the construction of a healthier lifestyle. Whether a recovering person's social interactions are with professionals or are everyday interpersonal exchanges with intimates and others, they form the context within which the discursive evolution of identity is embedded. The narrative stories of the lived world of women in Alaska who are maintaining long-term recovery from alcohol problems provide an understanding of cultural, ethnic, and gender influences, various treatment and recovery paradigms, relational tensions, and the process of identity construction in the maintenance of ongoing recovery.
    • Work and family: communicative actions and interactions in employed women's management of dual roles

      Pope, Carla Renee (2005-05)
      Recent changes in American families have resulted in an influx of mothers entering the workforce. Research has addressed work and family issues by exploring the challenges people experience in their daily routines and social interactions. Medved (2004) explores married women's micro-practices in ordinary, everyday life to provide an understanding of how women negotiate work and family. This research extends Medved's work, by examining the micro-practices of employed mothers without domestic partners. This study employs conversational interviewing as a means of data gathering and an analysis technique focused on identifying routines or micro-practices in daily interaction. This research explores three issues: how women account for the accomplishment of work and family, how women interpret or understand their actions and interactions, and the forms of personal and emotional support they identify. The women who participated in this research accounted for their management of work and family in terms of two broad categories of routines: communicative practical actions and individual practical actions. The women's understandings of their actions and interactions were examined in terms of accountings they provided in discussing their daily routines and social interactions. The women identified forms of personal and emotional support unique to their situations as mothers without domestic partners.
    • You say I can, I think I can: peripheral route persuasion as a contributor to employability self-efficacy for undergraduate students

      Uzzell, Brandon W.; Sager, Kevin; Arundale, Robert; Richey, Jean (2011-05)
      The purpose of this study was to investigate the persuasive communication phenomenon between university students and professors concerning students' post-degree employability. Communicative interactions were examined as originating with the Elaboration likelihood model's peripheral route cues (persuasive messages) and the outcomes of these interactions as student's employability self-efficacy (beliefs about employability). Hypotheses predicted that a positive correlation exists between perceived peripheral route cues and employability self-efficacy of students. Senior level undergraduate students at a Northwestern university voluntarily completed an electronic survey containing need for cognition, peripheral route cues, and employability self-efficacy measures. Analysis indicated that employability self-efficacy could be successfully predicted by peripheral route cues. Results showed an overall significant positive correlation between the predictor and outcome variable. Implications of these results, limitations of the study, and future research directions are discussed.