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dc.contributor.authorMercer, Christopher J.
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-19T21:05:19Z
dc.date.available2014-12-19T21:05:19Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-19
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/4769
dc.descriptionPresented to the Faculty of the University of Alaska Anchorage in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of MASTER OF SCIENCEen_US
dc.description.abstractThroughout the arctic there are two primary community utilities with dramatically contrary thermodynamic concerns. These are the intensely exothermic diesel electric power generation, and the strongly endothermic water and sewer utility. In this context exothermic processes must expel excess heat while endothermic process requires heat input. Failure of engineers, community planners, funding agencies, and interest groups to recognize the full social, economic, and environmental impact to the sustainability of utilities has come at tremendous cost. This is exemplified in many remote Alaskan communities such as Toksook Bay, Minto, Deering, and Kotlik.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Alaska Anchorageen_US
dc.titleAnalysis of Thermal Interconnectivity of Utilities in Rural Alaskaen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-12-19T00:00:00Z


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