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dc.contributor.authorSformo, Todd
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-16T19:39:20Z
dc.date.available2015-02-16T19:39:20Z
dc.date.issued2003-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/4962
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2003en_US
dc.description.abstractThe use of operative environmental temperature (Te) has been a major advance in the study of thermal ecology. I review the use of operative temperature in thermal biology with an emphasis on insects. Then I use data from dragonflies in Interior Alaska (Odonata: Anisoptera) to compare the efficacy of operative and ambient temperature when examining thermoregulating ability. I conclude that although the use of Te may provide more accurate measures of thermoregulation under specific environmental conditions, the use of ambient temperature usually leads to the same conclusions about thermoregulating ability. I next examine the relationships between thermoregulating ability, minimum flight temperature (MFT), mass, passive cooling rate, and wing loading for the ten species of dragonflies present in Interior Alaska investigate the influence of ambient temperature and solar radiation on daily and seasonal activity patterns. I find a range of thermoregulating abilities from complete thermoconformers to very efficient periodic thermoregulators. The ability to thermoregulate is strongly tied to body mass. Thermoconfomers have significantly lower MFTs than thermoregulators, suggesting a possible tradeoff between the ability to operate and low and high thoracic temperatures.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThermoregulating ability and minimum flight temperature in interior Alaska dragonflies (Odonata: anisoptera)en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.degreemsen_US
dc.identifier.departmentDepartment of Biology and Wildlifeen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-13T01:14:22Z


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