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dc.contributor.authorRattenbury, Kumi L.
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-16T00:33:30Z
dc.date.available2015-06-16T00:33:30Z
dc.date.issued2006-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/5567
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2006en_US
dc.description.abstractIntrinsic to the discussion about climate change is the effect of daily weather and other environmental conditions on natural resource-based livelihoods. Reindeer herders on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska have relied on specific conditions to conduct intensive herding in response to winter range expansion by the Western Arctic Caribou Herd (WAH). From 1992 to 2005, over 17,000 reindeer (affecting 13 of 15 herds) were lost due to mixing and emigration with the WAH. An interdisciplinary case study with one herder provided insights about the role of weather within the social-ecological system of herding. Inclement conditions disrupted herding plans at the same time that a smaller herd, diminished antler markets, and rising fuel costs have been disincentives to continue herding. Travel-limiting conditions, such as reduced visibility, delayed freeze-up, and early break-up, were implicated in herd loss to caribou or predators by several herders. However, these conditions have rarely been measured by climate change research, or they involve combinations of environmental factors that are difficult to quantify. If such events occur more frequently, as predicted by local residents and climate change models, herders will have to adapt to shorter and warmer winters, along with the continued presence of caribou in the region.en_US
dc.description.tableofcontents1. Introduction -- 1.1. Climate change, caribou and reindeer herding -- 1.2. Climate change and Arctic communities -- 1.3. Adaptability in social-ecological systems -- 1.4. Climate change, SES's and the case for interdisciplinary case studies -- 1.5. Study approach -- 1.6. Thesis structure -- 2. Background information -- 2.1. Reindeer herding on the Seward Peninsula -- 2.1.1. History of reindeer herding in Alaska, 1891-1988 -- 2.1.2. Modern reindeer herding on the Seward Peninsula -- 2.2. Case study : James Noyakuk of Teller, Alaska -- 2.2.1. Study area : Noyakuk's range -- 2.2.2. Noyakuk's family history and training in herding -- 2.2.3. Establishment and history of the Noyakuk herd -- 2.2.4. Caribou on the Noyakuk range -- 3. Methods -- 3.1. Case study interviews -- 3.1.1. Semi-directed interviews -- 3.1.2. Structured phone survey about weather limitations -- 3.1.3. Regular phone conversations about daily herding activities -- 3.1.4. Organization of interview information -- 3.2. Weather stations -- 3.2.1. Weather station deployment and data used -- 3.2.2. Weather data consolidation -- 3.3. Linking Noyakuk's activities and observations with weather station data -- 3.4. Snow measurements -- 3.5. Mapping relationships between herding, reindeer, and caribou -- 3.5.1. Mapping reindeer locations -- 3.5.2. Weather data consolidation -- 3.5. Mapping relationships between herding, reindeer, and caribou -- 3.5.1. Mapping reindeer locations -- 3.5.2. Caribou home range kernals on the Seward Peninsula -- 4. Results -- 4.1. Herding seasons, daily decisions, and the effects of weather and other environmental factors -- 4.1.1. Seasonal herding activities -- 4.1.2. Factors affecting daily herding decisions -- 4.1.3. Weather and other environmental concerns for herding -- a. Freeze-up, mid-winter ice, and break-up -- b. Visibility -- c. Snow and other trail conditions -- d. Wind and air temperature -- 4.2. Relating herding decisions to weather observations and weather station data -- 4.2.1. February 14 to May 29, 2004 -- a. Chronological account -- b. Ratings result -- 4.2.2. October 1, 2004 to March 14, 2005 -- a. Chronological account -- b. December 1, 2004 to March 14, 2005 : ratings results -- 4.2.3. March 15 to May 31, 2005 -- a. Chronological account -- b. Ratings results -- 5. Discussion -- 5.1. Weather and other environmental impacts to winter herd management in 2004 and 2005 -- 5.1.1. Timing of freeze-up and break-up -- 5.1.2. Visibility -- 5.1.3. Snow and other trail conditions -- 5.1.4. Temperature, wind and windchil -- 5.2 The rating system -- 5.3. Terrain implications -- 5.4. The social-ecological system (SES) of Seward Peninsula herding -- 5.4.1. Adaptations in herd management -- 5.4.2. Technological adaptations : new opportunities -- 5.4.3. Socioeconomic constraints and opportunities 5.5. Climate change and Noyakuk's herding SES -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Appendices.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleReindeer herding, weather and environmental change on the Seward Peninsula, Alaskaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.degreemsen_US
dc.identifier.departmentDepartment of Biology and Wildlifeen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-05T10:09:54Z


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