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dc.contributor.authorMiller, Derek Dan
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-24T01:47:58Z
dc.date.available2015-11-24T01:47:58Z
dc.date.issued2005-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/6217
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2005en_US
dc.description.abstractTundra lakes are a valuable freshwater resource on the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain and are of increasing relevance as the petroleum industry in Alaska continues to rely on the freshwater resource to support exploration and production activities. An investigation of the physical and chemical effects of mid-winter pumping activities was conducted at four tundra lakes on the Alaska Arctic Coastal Plain during the 2002-2003 and 2003-2004 winters. The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of removing water from tundra lakes for the construction of ice roads and pads. Measurements of water surface level, specific conductance, temperature and dissolved oxygen were recorded in near real-time, providing an opportunity to detect immediate and cumulative responses from pumping activities. Water quality variables and recharge processes were also examined to further determine the impacts of mid-winter pumping activity. In examining and characterizing the effects of the water withdrawal, changes in water surface level were detected but no chemical or thermal differences were detected due to pumping.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe physical and chemical effects of mid-winter pumping of tundra lakes on the North Slope, Alaskaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.degreemsen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-05T12:17:12Z


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