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dc.contributor.authorCook, Nancy Allyn
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-09T00:41:28Z
dc.date.available2015-12-09T00:41:28Z
dc.date.issued2003-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/6278
dc.descriptionThesis (M.F.A.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2003en_US
dc.description.abstractChronicling one woman's coming-of-age in the Kennicott Valley of the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Siltwater spans twelve years (1992-2002), and includes elements of memoir, reportage, personal profile, literary criticism, philosophical essay, prose poetry and a pair of formal poems. Structurally the text is divided into three sections: Finding Home, Neighbors and Reckoning, with each section including full-length essays interwoven with more poetic shorts. As a whole, the text challenges the notion of Alaska as a Last Frontier, and instead presents an inhabited wilderness complete with blue tarps, wolf trappers, booming tourist towns, and large bureaucracies. The Alaska physical geography-with glaciers, rivers, and grizzlies-is presented alongside a unique human geography-with Park Rangers, Ahtna Athabascans, young adventurers, and seasoned renegades. Thematically, the text examines issues of human aesthetics and geographic determinism. The National Park Service emerges as an antagonist in a rural community's struggle to retain individual freedom and small town values during a period of rapid tourism growth. The prose poems allow a more emotional examination of place, and, as a group, suggest analogies between romantic love and an intimate sense of place.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSiltwateren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.degreemfaen_US
dc.identifier.departmentDepartment of Englishen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-12T01:01:59Z


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