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dc.contributor.authorZibell, Chelsey
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-20T23:45:14Z
dc.date.available2016-06-20T23:45:14Z
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/6654
dc.descriptionThesis (M.F.A.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2016en_US
dc.description.abstractWhen I began graduate school as an M.A. student, my first idea for a thesis was to prove that stories from the Iñupiaq oral tradition could be considered poetry. In my mind, that would bring these stories to a level I thought they deserved. In my ignorance, I thought that the tradition needed me to validate it. However, I came to the realization that my thoughts indicated a prejudice on my part: these stories didn’t need my validation. I needed to accept them as they are, and also to accept that I was an authoritative reader of these stories. Much of my poetry seeks to retell and interpret these traditional unipchaat. I address questions that have crossed my mind, and questions that I imagine would cross my readers’ minds. My questions arise from my own context as an Iñupiaq, as a Naluaġmiu, and as a Christian. Therefore, the unipchaat need quliaqtuat and uqaluktuat to lean on. But sometimes the condensed form of a poem is not enough context for a non-Iñupiaq reader, or even an Iñupiaq reader. Out of this came several essays for the poetry and the reader to lean on. The late Jimmie Killigivuk of Point Hope said this of traditional stories: “You must always tell two: stories lean against each other. Otherwise the first one is alone and will fall over.” So it is with creative writing. One text may very well be made to stand on its own, but it is never alone in context.en_US
dc.description.tableofcontentsSong -- Section I: Unipchaat -- Aliŋnaq’s Sister -- Creation, from Kalaallit Nunaat -- Kinnaq Nutiktuq Ikniġmun, Kinnaq Jumps into the Fire -- Nuyaqpalik -- Fire -- Myths and Legends: a Section of Collected Stories -- Section II: Quliaqtuat -- Iqsiñak: Fear Not -- Kuukisaana -- Peaches -- Sketching Eyes -- Qaġġun -- Avittuq/ It separates -- prayer for the release of anger -- One of My Duties as an Eskimo Traditionalist is that I Must Know How to Sew -- Section III: Uqaluktuat -- Circles of Identity: Tribes and Corporations -- Standing at the Stairs -- A Mask Made for Art Class -- Ethnolinguistics -- Saŋŋiich -- Elegy to an Eskimo Prophet -- Learning to Dance -- Values -- Iñupiat Iļiqusiat -- Suli -- The Enchanted Sky -- Glossary.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleUqalugaatkaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.degreemfaen_US
dc.identifier.departmentDepartment of Englishen_US
dc.contributor.chairBurleson, Derick
dc.contributor.chairReilly, Terence
dc.contributor.committeeRuppert, James
dc.contributor.committeeHill, Sean
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-05T13:44:01Z


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