• Anchorage Underage Drinking Survey: Assessing Attitudes, Values, and Beliefs About the Underage Drinking Problem and Responses to It

      Rivera, Marny (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-04-17)
      This slide presentation, prepared for a town hall meeting in Anchorage, AK, presents results from a survey conducted in 2010-2011 of a random sample of adult Anchorage residents on adult perceptions of underage drinking and responses to it.
    • Exploratory Spatial Analyses of Sexual Assaults in Anchorage

      Rosay, André B.; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-04)
      Using data on the locations of sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000 and 2001, the authors used Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis techniques to (1) identify the locations where sexual assaults were concentrated and (2) examine the correlates of these spatial concentrations. In both analyses, the authors also examined differences between white and Native victimizations. The spatial concentrations of sexual assault victimizations vary significantly by race, as do the correlates of the respective spatial concentrations. The authors conclude that there is a relationship between assault locations and bar locations, but that the relationship far from perfect and the question of whether there is a causal mechanism exists remains unknown. Nonetheless, successful interventions to prevent sexual assaults must involve bars; but targeting bars will be both inefficient and insufficient for fully addressing the problem of sexual assault prevention in Anchorage.
    • Model Programs for the Prevention of Youth Violence

      Rosay, André B.; Chamard, Sharon (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-01-28)
      This poster compares levels of youth violence in Anchorage to U.S. levels and identifies effective programs to reduce levels of youth violence, including functional family therapy, multisystemic therapy, nurse-family partnership, multidimensional treatment foster care, bullying prevention program, promoting alternative thinking strategies, and "the incredible years." Estimated program costs are also detailed.
    • Public Perceptions of School Resource Officer (SRO) Programs

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-11)
      This Powerpoint slide presentation gives background on school resource officer (SRO) programs, which place police officers in schools, and presents analysis of public perceptions of the SRO program in Anchorage School District, which was established in 2003.
    • School Resource Officers: Public Perspectives and Perceptions

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-02-10)
      This Powerpoint slide presentation presents an overview of school resource officer (SRO) programs, which place police officers in schools, and provides results of a preliminary analysis of perceptions of the SRO program in Anchorage School District. Currently 16 officers plus two supervisors of Anchorage Police Department are assigned to the Anchorage SRO program, which was established in 2003.
    • 'Stand Your Ground': History and Effects

      Payne, Troy C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-11-07)
      This slide presentation discusses Stand Your Ground laws in other states and available research on the impact of these laws. The presentation was presented as part of a community forum at Clark Middle School in Anchorage on "Stand Your Ground Law in Alaska" sponsored by the Anchorage Community Police Relations Task Force and the Anchorage Equal Rights Commission.
    • Underage Drinking: Research, Evaluation, and Related Efforts

      Rivera, Marny; Casto, L. Diane (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-04-04)
      This presentation summarizes existing research on and effort to reduce underage drinking in Alaska, emphasizing the value of research to assist in addressing minor consuming alcohol (MCA) enforcement and response.
    • Using Problem-Oriented Policing to Reduce Sexual Assaults

      Rosay, André B.; Langworthy, Robert H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-05-13)
      Alaska generally and Anchorage specifically have been plagued by the incidence of sexual assaults. From 1982 to 2001, the rate of forcible rape per 100,000 in Anchorage was, on average, 122 percent higher than the U.S. rate. To combat this problem, the authors engaged in a problem-oriented policing exercise in cooperation with the Anchorage Police Department. They began this exercise by performing a detailed descriptive analysis of sexual assaults in Anchorage. Data were collected from 541 reports of sexual assault cases reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000 and 2001. These data contain detailed information on the assaults, victims, and suspects. Using crime-mapping technologies, hot spots of sexual assaults were identified and profiles developed for each hot spot. With this detailed understanding of the characteristics of each hot spot, empirically-based strategies were developed to reduce the occurrence of sexual assaults. After implementing each strategy, an evaluation of whether the occurrence of sexual assaults had significantly declined was performed. This presentation focuses on the initial stages of problem-oriented policing—the identification and explanation of hot spots. More specifically, the utility of using crime-mapping technologies in the identification of hot spots of sexual assaults is documented and the necessity of using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies to explain where and why sexual assaults are geographically concentrated is described. With a better understanding of the nature of sexual assaults, it has been possible to develop and implement more successful intervention strategies.
    • Youth Violence Study, Anchorage, AK: Youth Violence Progress Report

      Rosay, André B.; Chamard, Sharon (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-03-16)
      This slide presentation describes youth violence in Anchorage by providing initial comparisons between current Anchorage conditions and conditions of the past five to ten years, as well as initial comparisons between Anchorage and the rest of the U.S. Data shows that youth violence in Anchorage is not a serious problem, is at levels similar to or lower than national rates of youth violence, and is declining in Anchorage as it is nationally. Youth violence is also not perceived to be a serious problem in Anchorage, according to a public survey of Anchorage residents. Nonetheless, efforts to reduced and prevent youth violence in Anchorage are necessary; this progress report identifies some successful programs, and suggests how to develop policies to reduce levels of youth violence in Anchorage.