• Growth of juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) as an indicator of density-dependence in the Chena River

      Perry, Megan T. (2012-08)
      In management of Pacific salmon, it is often assumed that density-dependent factors, mediated by the physical environment during freshwater residency, regulate population size prior to smolting and outmigration. However, in years following low escapement, temperature may be setting the upper limit on growth of juvenile chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha during the summer rearing period. Given the importance of juvenile salmon survival for the eventual adult population size, we require a greater understanding of how density-dependent and independent factors affect juvenile demography through time. In this study we tested the hypotheses that (1) juvenile chinook salmon in the Chena River are food limited, and (2) that freshwater growth of juvenile chinook salmon is positively related with marine survival. We tested the first hypotheses using an in-situ supplemental feeding experiment, and the second hypothesis by conducting a retrospective analysis on juvenile growth estimated using a bioenergetics model related to return per spawner estimates from a stock-recruit analysis. We did not find evidence of food limitation, nor evidence that marine survival is correlated with freshwater growth. However, we did find some evidence suggesting that growth during the freshwater rearing period may be limited by food availability following years when adult escapement is high.