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dc.contributor.authorMcCullough, Nicole Susan
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-08T23:41:37Z
dc.date.available2016-08-08T23:41:37Z
dc.date.issued2001-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/6757
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2001en_US
dc.description.abstractMany people consider Alaska the last frontier, isolated and independent from the rest of the United States. An analysis of the salmon industry in Bristol Bay and a strike that occurred in 1951 cast doubt upon this belief. The labor dispute and preceding events paint a vivid picture of a population clearly dependent on a fishing industry controlled by absentee owners who manipulated events from Seattle and San Francisco. The strikers included Natives and Non-Natives who joined together to fight the powerful cannery owners and west coast unions who sought to expand their membership. Some of these unions had suspected communist members, and Alaska joined in the paranoia that seized the rest of the United States in their cold war fear of Communism. The strike and the actions of participants in the strike illustrate how Alaska's isolation and independence was but an illusion in the last frontier.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe 1951 Bristol Bay salmon strike: isolation, independence and illusion in the last frontieren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.degreemaen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-01-25T02:07:32Z


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