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dc.contributor.authorJoy, Philip John
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-11T00:32:16Z
dc.date.available2016-08-11T00:32:16Z
dc.date.issued2001-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/6777
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2001en_US
dc.description.abstractUsing a mark-recapture design, an epidemiological investigation of Hepatitis B was performed on four colonies of Spermophylus parryi. Animals were trapped, marked and bled. Serum samples were screened for Hepatitis B markers. Program MARK was used to estimate survival rates. Prevalence rates ranged over 55% and 1999 rates were 10% higher than 1998. Vertical transmission of the virus was not observed and juveniles were unaffected by the mother's hepatitis status. Immigrants had lower prevalence rates than residents and incidence rates accelerated throughout the study. Survival was highest during the over-winter period and adult rates were lower in 1999. Recovered animals had different survival rates than other animals and survival rates of recovered animals were lower in 1999. Evidence suggests that delayed development of disease and/or environmental conditions lowered survival rates of recovered adults in 1999. Techniques that integrated epidemiology and population biology proved fruitful and worthy of further development.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHepatitis B in Arctic ground squirrels (Spermophylus parryi): epidemiology and population biologyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-01-25T02:08:09Z


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