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dc.contributor.authorPower, Julianne M.
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-12T22:38:11Z
dc.date.available2016-09-12T22:38:11Z
dc.date.issued2016-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/6815
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2016en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis addresses the need to identify more accessible and cost-effective ways for federal food assistance programs to deliver nutrition education to Alaska Native people living in rural and remote communities in Alaska. The ultimate aim is to explore whether technology-based nutrition education is a feasible and acceptable alternative to traditional face-to-face nutrition counseling. I begin this thesis by examining the preliminary efficacy and acceptability of an 11 week text message-based intervention to promote fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake among parents with young children (n=74) using a pre-post study design. Although there were no changes in pre-post measures, most participants reported positive changes in attitudes and behaviors related to F&V intake since participating in the intervention. Participants thought the intervention was credible (80.8%), found texts useful (71.6%), and would recommend the program to a friend (82.2%).The next chapter explores the feasibility of technology-based nutrition education in rural and remote areas of the state by estimating the use of media technology among Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) participants (n=975) in Alaska Native communities using a self-administered, mailed questionnaire. The response rate was 37.7% (N=368). Respondents were primarily Alaska Native (99.1%) women (97.5%) between 18-29 years of age (56.6%). Smartphone (78.8%) and Facebook (80.3%) use were comparable to national averages, but having a computer at home (38.4%) was much less likely. Text messaging was common, with 93.3% of respondents reporting use at least once per week or more frequently. Potential barriers included slow internet (51.0%), no computer access (42.1%), and high cost of internet (35.1%). Nutrition education delivered via mobile devices is an ideal way to reach Alaska Native people in remote communities, provided that such programs limit the amount of cellular data necessary for participation. The findings from this thesis provide important evidence supporting the use of text messaging and other media technology in nutrition education efforts by WIC and other federal food assistance programs for Alaska Native people living in rural and remote communities. These findings will inform technology-based nutrition education efforts throughout Alaska.en_US
dc.description.tableofcontentsChapter 1: Introduction -- Chapter 2: Txt4HappyKids: A text messaging pilot study to promote fruit and vegetable intake among families with young children -- Chapter 3: Exploring the potential for technology-based nutrition education among WIC recipients in remote Alaska Native villages -- Chapter 4: Conclusion.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleExploring the potential for technology-based nutrition education for low-income families in Alaskaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.degreemsen_US
dc.identifier.departmentDepartment of Biology and Wildlifeen_US
dc.contributor.chairBersamin, Andrea
dc.contributor.committeeJohnson, Jennifer
dc.contributor.committeeBraun, Kathryn
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-05T13:10:48Z


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