The mission of the Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC) is to compile, analyze, and report on criminal justice topics to policymakers and practitioners in order to improve public safety, to increase criminal justice system accountability, and to reduce recidivism. AJiC is jointly funded by the State of Alaska and the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority and is housed within the Justice Center at University of Alaska Anchorage.

AJiC website: http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/ajic/

Note: In 2017, AJiC merged with the Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center (AJSAC), which was designated as Alaska's statistical analysis center in 1986 by Governor William Sheffield. See AJSAC reports and other publications (prior to the merge).

Collections in this community

  • AJiC Alaska Police-Public Contact Survey

    Compiles and analyzes 2022 survey data on Alaskans’ perceptions of encounters with police.
  • AJiC Alaska Victimization Survey

    Presents estimates on topics relating to women’s experiences with intimate partner violence in Alaska.
  • AJiC Fact Sheets

    One-page reports derived from publicly available data on criminal justice issues in Alaska.
  • AJiC Homicide in Alaska

    Examines Alaska homicide data (1976-2016) compiled from the FBI's Supplementary Homicide Reports (SHR).
  • AJiC Presentations

    AJiC generated presentations on various criminal justice topics impacting Alaska.
  • AJiC Reports

    Full research and analysis reports on crime prevalence and justice systems response in Alaska.
  • UCR Archive

    Archive of Alaska Uniform Crime Reports 1976-1999

Recent Submissions

  • Nonconsensual Contact, Repeated Nonconsensual Contact, and Fear: Findings from the 2020 Alaska Victimization Survey

    Shimizu, Rei; Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Information Center, 2024-03-22)
    Using data from the 2020 Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS), this report examines nonconsensual contact, repeated nonconsensual contact, and the fear felt by those who experience nonconsensual and repeated nonconsensual contact. All percentages included in the report are weighted. Hence, the data is representative of population estimates, namely noninstitutionalized English-speaking adult women residing in Alaska.
  • Alaska Homicide Suspect-Victim Relationships Fact Sheet

    Gonzalez, Andrew (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2020-05-20)
    AJiC's Homicide in Alaska: 1976-2016 report compiled 41 years of data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Supplementary Homicide Reports (SHR). This is the first time these data on homicide in Alaska have been examined across a multi-year timespan. This one-page fact sheet presents the relationships between homicide victims and suspects for Alaska homicides.
  • Alaska Firearm Homicide Fact Sheet

    Gonzalez, Andrew (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2020-05-20)
    AJiC's Homicide in Alaska: 1976-2016 report compiled 41 years of data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Supplementary Homicide Reports (SHR). This is the first time these data on homicide in Alaska have been examined across a multi-year timespan. This one-page fact sheet presents the characteristics of Alaska homicide victims who were killed by a firearm.
  • Alaska Homicide Victimization Characteristics Fact Sheet

    Gonzalez, Andrew (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2020-05-20)
    AJiC's Homicide in Alaska: 1976-2016 report compiled 41 years of data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Supplementary Homicide Reports (SHR). This is the first time these data on homicide in Alaska have been examined across a multi-year timespan. This one-page fact sheet presents the characteristics of Alaska homicide victims.
  • Alaska Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Data Systems Development: Gaps, Opportunities, & Recommendations

    Hedwig, Travis; Miller, Virginia; Parker, David; Payne, Troy C.; Gonzalez, Andrew; Kisarauskas, Yevgenii; Slone, Avram; Brown, Paulsen; Harvey, Hattie; Hiratsuka, Vanessa; et al. (UAA College of Health, 2021-06-28)
    The report, "Alaska Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Data Systems Development," was prepared for the Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority by the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) College of Health. This report was a partnership between the Alaska Justice Information Center, the Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, the Center for Human Development, and the Division of Population Health Sciences.
  • Fast Facts on Sexual Violence in Alaska, 2020

    Gonzalez, Andrew; Johnson, Ingrid (Alaska Justice Information Center, 2023-10-23)
    Sexual violence is an attempted or completed sexual act toward or upon a person who has not freely given consent or is unable to consent or refuse. This publication, "Fast Facts on Sexual Violence in Alaska, 2020", presents point-prevalence estimates of sexual violence in Alaska, along with its two main types: estimates of the prevalence of non-contact sexual violence and the prevalence of contact sexual violence. These estimates come from the 2020 Alaska Victimization Survey. To learn more about sexual violence in Alaska, or the Alaska Victimization Survey, go to https://www.uaa.alaska.edu/avs.
  • Fast Facts on Intimate Partner Abuse in Alaska, 2020

    Gonzalez, Andrew; Johnson, Ingrid (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2023-10-24)
    Intimate partner abuse is more than physical violence. It also include psychological aggression (insulting and humiliating behaviors) and coercive control and entrapment (behaviors that are intended to monitor, control, or threaten). This publication, "Fast Facts on Intimate Partner Abuse in Alaska, 2020", presents point-prevalence estimates of intimate partner abuse in Alaska, along with its three main types described above. These estimates come from the 2020 Alaska Victimization Survey. To learn more about intimate partner abuse in Alaska, or the Alaska Victimization Survey, go to https://www.uaa.alaska.edu/avs.
  • Persons Who May Be Alaska Mental Health Trust Beneficiaries had more Adverse Childhood Experiences

    Gonzalez, Andrew; Johnson, Ingrid; Payne, Troy C. (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2021-10-25)
    The Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC) at the University of Alaska Anchorage has released this Fact Sheet in support of the report, “Adverse Childhood Experiences, Intimate Partner Violence, and Sexual Violence Among Persons Who May Be Alaska Mental Health Trust Beneficiaries: Findings from the Alaska Victimization Survey.” This report used data from the 2020 Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS) to estimate the extent to which victims of intimate partner violence and sexual assault were Alaska Mental Health Trust beneficiaries. It also estimated the extent to which Alaska Mental Health Trust beneficiaries experienced Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Alaska Mental Health Trust beneficiaries include Alaskans with mental illness, developmental disabilities, chronic alcohol or drug addiction, Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia, and traumatic brain injuries.
  • Persons Who May Be Alaska Mental Health Trust Beneficiaries were more likely to experience Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Violence

    Gonzalez, Andrew; Johnson, Ingrid; Payne, Troy C. (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2021-10-25)
    The Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC) at the University of Alaska Anchorage has released this Fact Sheet in conjunction with a new report, “Adverse Childhood Experiences, Intimate Partner Violence, and Sexual Violence Among Persons Who May Be Alaska Mental Health Trust Beneficiaries: Findings from the Alaska Victimization Survey.” This report used data from the 2020 Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS) to estimate the extent to which victims of intimate partner violence and sexual assault were Alaska Mental Health Trust beneficiaries. It also estimated the extent to which Alaska Mental Health Trust beneficiaries experienced Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Alaska Mental Health Trust beneficiaries include Alaskans with mental illness, developmental disabilities, chronic alcohol or drug addiction, Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia, and traumatic brain injuries.
  • Adverse Childhood Experiences, Intimate Partner Violence, and Sexual Violence Among Persons Who May Be Alaska Mental Health Trust Beneficiaries: Findings from the Alaska Victimization Survey

    Gonzalez, Andrew; Ingrid, Johnson; Troy C., Payne (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2021-10-25)
    The Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC) at the University of Alaska Anchorage has released a new report, “Adverse Childhood Experiences, Intimate Partner Violence, and Sexual Violence Among Persons Who May Be Alaska Mental Health Trust Beneficiaries: Findings from the Alaska Victimization Survey.” This report used data from the 2020 Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS) to estimate the extent to which victims of intimate partner violence and sexual assault were Alaska Mental Health Trust beneficiaries. It also estimated the extent to which Alaska Mental Health Trust beneficiaries experienced Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Alaska Mental Health Trust beneficiaries include Alaskans with mental illness, developmental disabilities, chronic alcohol or drug addiction, Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia, and traumatic brain injuries.
  • Relationships between Intimate Partner Violence and Alaskan Women's Health

    Johnson, Ingrid; Gonzalez, Andrew (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2023-11-30)
    This report details a sample of Alaskan women's experiences with psychological, physical, and sexual harm by an intimate partner, and the relationships between those experiences and their current physical and mental health. These analyses of Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS) data are comprised of almost 13,000 survey responses from adult, non-institutionalized Alaskan women. The findings confirm those of prior, non-Alaska based research that all types of historical and recent intimate partner violence (IPV) are linked to victims’ current physical and mental health. Non-physical IPV has the same negative relationships with various health status indicators as physical IPV: Control, threats, and psychological aggression are generally associated with the same prevalence of negative health outcomes as physical violence, although sexual violence is associated with the highest prevalence of negative health outcomes.
  • Crime in Alaska - 1999

    Alaska Department of Public Safety (1999)
  • Crime in Alaska - 1998

    Alaska Department of Public Safety (1998)
  • Crime in Alaska - 1997

    Alaska Department of Public Safety (1997)
  • Crime in Alaska - 1996

    Alaska Department of Public Safety (1996)
  • Crime in Alaska - 1995

    Alaska Department of Public Safety (1995)
  • Crime in Alaska - 1994

    Alaska Department of Public Safety (1994)
  • Crime in Alaska - 1993

    Alaska Department of Public Safety (1993)
  • Crime in Alaska - 1992

    Alaska Department of Public Safety (1992)
  • Crime in Alaska - 1991

    Alaska Department of Public Safety (1991)

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