• Alaska Results First Initiative: Adult Criminal Justice Program Benefit Cost Analysis

      Valle, Araceli (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-10-02)
      Results of the Alaska Results First Initiative show that most of Alaska’s evidence-based adult criminal justice programs are showing positive return on state investment of money. Notably, all but one of those programs are shown to measurably reduce recidivism — the likelihood that an inmate will re-offend when released — which not only improves public safety, but saves the state the costs associated with criminal activity. The State of Alaska annually invests in Alaska’s adult criminal justice system to provide services and programs to eligible offenders, including domestic violence treatment, vocational and general education, and re-entry services. The study estimates that approximately $20.58 million in state funds were invested annually to the 19 evidence-based adult criminal justice programs that are shown — by academic studies and rigorous reviews — to yield results. The report is the result of a multi-year project, with support and participation of all three branches of Alaska state government, and in partnership with the Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative.
    • Alaska Results First — Benefit-Cost Findings: Adult Criminal Justice Programs

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Valle, Araceli (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-06-15)
      This slideshow, presented to the Alaska Criminal Justice Commission and Alaska Criminal Justice Working Group, presents Results First benefit to cost model estimates on 19 Alaska adult criminal justice programs. The Results First analysis of evidence-based programs, developed in partnership with the Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative, provides policymakers with a tool to better understand the relationship between the state’s monetary investment in programs and the return on that investment in terms of the benefits of reduced recidivism.