• AJiC Tableau Dashboard Style Guide

      Payne, Troy C.; Kisarauskas, Yevgenii; Slone, Avram; Gonzalez, Andrew (2020-09-02)
      This document describes the broad design and style conventions of Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC) Tableau data dashboards. This document is meant as a style guide, and deviations from the general guidelines may be necessary for specific projects. Design goals and styles for every part of a dashboard are presented in the document.
    • Alaska Police Officer Use of Deadly Force: 2010-2020

      Payne, Troy C.; Kisarauskas, Yevgenii; Henderson, Robert E. (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2021-04-21)
      The Alaska Department of Law Office of Special Prosecutions (OSP) and the Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC) partnered to answer two questions regarding police officer use of deadly force. First, to what extent existing OSP investigative casefiles could be used to fully describe the nature of uses of lethal force incidents in Alaska. Second, to describe lethal use of force incidents using the available information. We found that while OSP casefiles files contained sufficient information for OSP’s purpose of determining whether criminal charges are warranted under the circumstances, the OSP casefiles lacked some information of interest to policymakers and the public. AJiC analyzed all OSP casefiles involving officer uses of lethal force from 2010 to October 2020, covering a total of 92 incidents, 100 citizens, and 295 officers. Just over half of citizens died as a result of the incident in which deadly force was used, with another quarter sustaining serious injuries. Nearly every citizen involved displayed or used a weapon. No human officers were killed in the incidents reviewed, but two police dogs were killed, and three officers were seriously injured. Over a third of incidents involved the citizen making statements indicating they wanted to commit suicide-by-cop, and over two-thirds of incidents involved a citizen exhibiting some indication of mental illness during the incident. A third of incidents involved a citizen who had consumed alcohol, and methamphetamine/amphetamine was the most common drug other than alcohol, involved in more than a quarter of incidents. We offer the following recommendations for data collection based on our project: 1. The State of Alaska should develop a comprehensive statewide data collection regarding police officer uses of lethal force housed at an agency that can compile and use the information to drive policy. 2. OSP casefiles can serve as a starting point for data collection, but OSP case files cannot be the sole data source. 3. The development of a comprehensive data collection platform should include mandatory standardized data elements, starting with the FBI’s National Use-of-Force Data Collection Elements. 4. Other data elements should be considered for inclusion by a broad group of stakeholders from inside and outside of the criminal justice system. 5. Detailed use of lethal force incident data should be public where possible — but that may not always be possible or advisable.
    • Alaska Results First Initiative: Adult Criminal Justice Program Benefit Cost Analysis

      Valle, Araceli (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-10-02)
      Results of the Alaska Results First Initiative show that most of Alaska’s evidence-based adult criminal justice programs are showing positive return on state investment of money. Notably, all but one of those programs are shown to measurably reduce recidivism — the likelihood that an inmate will re-offend when released — which not only improves public safety, but saves the state the costs associated with criminal activity. The State of Alaska annually invests in Alaska’s adult criminal justice system to provide services and programs to eligible offenders, including domestic violence treatment, vocational and general education, and re-entry services. The study estimates that approximately $20.58 million in state funds were invested annually to the 19 evidence-based adult criminal justice programs that are shown — by academic studies and rigorous reviews — to yield results. The report is the result of a multi-year project, with support and participation of all three branches of Alaska state government, and in partnership with the Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative.
    • Alaska Results First Initiative: Progress Report & Initial Findings

      Valle, Araceli; Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-07-15)
      This report presents the initial results of Alaska’s Results First Initiative, which is examining both the effectiveness and the efficiency of the state's adult criminal justice programs by conducting a comprehensive review of the full array of programs funded by the state. The review includes a thorough inventory of state-funded programs, determining the proportion of those programs that are evidence-based, and detailing both the costs of operating those programs, as well as the benefits derived from them via reductions in offender recidivism. The Alaska Results First Iniative is a participant in the Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative, a "smart justice" approach to reducing recidivism under the auspices of The Pew Charitable Trusts and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, that is being led in our Alaska by the Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC), housed in the UAA Justice Center.
    • Alaska Results First — Benefit-Cost Findings: Adult Criminal Justice Programs

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Valle, Araceli (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-06-15)
      This slideshow, presented to the Alaska Criminal Justice Commission and Alaska Criminal Justice Working Group, presents Results First benefit to cost model estimates on 19 Alaska adult criminal justice programs. The Results First analysis of evidence-based programs, developed in partnership with the Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative, provides policymakers with a tool to better understand the relationship between the state’s monetary investment in programs and the return on that investment in terms of the benefits of reduced recidivism.
    • Alaska State Troopers C Detachment Patrol Staffing Study Final Report and Description of Police Incidents

      Payne, Troy C.; Kisarauskas, Yevgenii (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2020-07-07)
      This report provides a workload-based staffing estimate for the Alaska State Troopers C Detachment sworn staff, including troopers and court service officers. The report begins by examining incidents serviced by C Detachment for meaningful changes over years, seasonal variation, and variation by incident type. Next, we describe challenges of creating a workload- based model for staffing C Detachment, followed by summaries of interviews with sergeants in C Detachment and a description of C Detachment’s stated goals. The model is specified next, including a post-by-post staffing recommendation for C Detachment based on the 75th percentile of the number of reports, adjusted for leave and other factors.
    • Alaska Trial Court Caseload FY 2007–2018

      Kisarauskas, Yevgenii (Alaska Justice Information Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-06-27)
      This fact sheet presents data on criminal case filings in Alaska trial courts for fiscal years 2007–2018. From FY07 to FY18, misdemeanors filed in Alaska trial courts decreased while felonies filed increased. The majority of the increase in total felony filings came from violent, property, and weapons cases. The majority of the decline in district court cases is due to declining filings in public order, DUI, and other motor vehicle cases. Data are drawn from annual reports of the Alaska Court System.
    • Criminal Justice Reform: A Discussion of Senate Bill 91 — Reducing the Prison Population While Enhancing Public Safety

      Dunham, Barbara; Valle, Araceli (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2016-12-08)
      This slideshow, presented at a public discussion on criminal justice reform, presents data on the growth of correctional populations in Alaska and information on criminal justice reform efforts culminating in the passage in July 2016 of Senate Bill 91 (SB91), "Omnibus Criminal Law & Procedure; Corrections," which incorporated recommendations of the Alaska Criminal Justice Commission. Presenters were Barbara Dunham of the Alaska Criminal Justice Commission and Dr. Araceli Valle of the Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC).
    • Drug Cases Filed across the Alaska Court System, FY 2008–2017

      Reinhard, Daniel (Alaska Justice Information Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-08-07)
      This fact sheet presents data on drug-related court filings throughout the state of Alaska for the fiscal years (FY) 2008 through 2017 and the 10-year trend of misdemeanor and felony drug case filings for Alaska and for the Anchorage, Palmer, Kenai and Fairbanks courts over the same period. Overall, felony drug case filing rates remained stable or increased in all locations until FY15 or FY16, before decreasing dramatically from FY16 to FY17. The exception is the Fairbanks court, which maintained an overall decrease in felony drug case filing rates over the 10-year period. Misdemeanor drug case filing rates, regardless of whether they increased or decreased between FY 2008–2014, decreased in all locations from FY 2014–2016 before increasing from FY 2016–2017. The year with the lowest felony drug case filing rate, for all locations, was in FY17. The lowest misdemeanor drug case filing rate, for all locations, was in FY16. Data is drawn from annual reports of the Alaska Court System for the FY 2008 through 2017.
    • Drug Possession Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017

      Ervin, Benjamin (Alaska Justice Information Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-09-10)
      This fact sheet presents data on drug sale possession arrests reported by Alaska law enforcement agencies for the 32-year period 1986 to 2017. Overall, the drug possession arrest rate plateaued be-tween 1998 and 2010, consistently declined from 2010 to 2016, and slightly increased in 2017. The lowest recorded overall drug possession arrest rate was in 1990. Rates increased from 1986 through 1998, then de-clined for all populations from 2010 to 2016. The adult and male populations drive the overall trend in arrest rates, accounting for roughly four out of every five arrestees during this 32-year period. The trend shows less discrepancy in arrest rates be-tween males and females, as well as between adults and juveniles after 2010. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Drug Possession Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017 — Drug Types by Sex

      Ervin, Benjamin (Alaska Justice Information Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-12-19)
      This fact sheet presents data on drug possession arrests by type of drug and sex of arrestee as reported by Alaska law enforcement agencies for the 32-year period 1986 to 2017. Types of drugs include narcotics, synthetic narcotics, marijuana, and other non-narcotic drugs. Overall, males comprise roughly four out of five drug possession arrests in the state of Alaska. The female and male rates parallel one another in that they rise and fall at the same points in most years. In 2002, the synthetic narcotics and other non-narcotics possession arrest rates sharply increased for both males and females until the mid-2000s before a sharp decline and subsequent increase. Marijuana possession, the offense with the highest arrest rates, peaked at 90.4 per 100,000 female residents and 324.9 per 100,000 male residents. Synthetic narcotics possession, the offense with the lowest arrest rates, peaked at 13.8 per 100,000 female residents and 29.8 per 100,000 male residents. Narcotics possession is the only offense that peaked before 2000. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Drug Sale and Manufacture Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017

      Ervin, Benjamin (Alaska Justice Information Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-09-10)
      This fact sheet presents data on drug sale and manufacture arrests reported by Alaska law enforcement agencies for the 32-year period 1986 to 2017. Overall, the drug sale and manufacture arrest rate consistently declined between 1997 and 2017. The lowest recorded overall drug sale and manufacture arrest rate was in 2017. While drug sale and manufacture arrest rates for females and juveniles were relatively stable, arrest rates for males and adults showed a pronounced decrease. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Drug Sale and Manufacture Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017 — Drug Types by Sex

      Ervin, Benjamin (Alaska Justice Information Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-12-19)
      This fact sheet presents data on drug sale and manufacture arrests by type of drug and sex of arrestee as reported by Alaska law enforcement agencies for the 32-year period 1986 to 2017. Types of drugs include narcotics, synthetic narcotics, marijuana, and other non-narcotic drugs. Overall, males comprise roughly three-fourths of the total drug sale and manufacture arrests in the state of Alaska. The female and male rates parallel one another in that they rise and fall at the same points in most years. For all drugs, the difference between female and male arrest rates in 2017 are smaller than in 1986. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Homicide in Alaska: 1976-2016

      Gonzalez, Andrew (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2020-05-20)
      AJiC's Homicide in Alaska: 1976-2016 compiled 41 years of data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Supplementary Homicide Reports (SHR). This is the first time these data on homicide in Alaska have been examined across a multi-year timespan. The report describes homicide incidents, victims and suspects. These characteristics included weapon use, relationships between victims and suspects, circumstances, demographic characteristics, and more presenting the differences among race and sex groups. Additionally, the report makes note of the magnitude and characteristics of homicides involving American Indian and Alaska Native female victims, as well as how the rate of homicide victimization differs by race and sex of the victim. In addition to the full report, three one-page fact sheets are included: 1) Homicide Victimization Fact Sheet; 2) Firearms Fact Sheet, and; 3) Relationships Fact Sheet.
    • Motor Vehicle Theft Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1985–2015

      Reamey, Random (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-12-11)
      This fact sheet presents data on motor vehicle theft arrests reported in Alaska from 1985 to 2016 as reported in the Alaska Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. Overall, the motor vehicle arrest rate consistently declined between 1990 and 2014 when it reached the lowest level in the 1985–2016 period. The motor vehicle arrest rate rebounded in 2015 and 2016. Increases in Alaska motor vehicle arrest rates in 2015 and 2016 were particularly pronounced among adults and males, while motor vehicle arrest rates for juveniles and females remained minimal in comparison. On average, adults accounted for 62.6 percent and juveniles for 37.4 percent of all arrests for motor vehicle thefts reported in Alaska from 1985 to 2016. Males accounted for 81.8 percent of all motor vehicle theft arrests, females 18.2 percent.
    • Parole and Probation in Alaska, 2002–2016

      Reamey, Random (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-06-05)
      This fact sheet presents data on the characteristics of offenders who came under the supervision of the Alaska Department of Corrections, Division of Probation and Parole (DOC-PP) between 2002 and 2016. Probation and parole offender data are from the Alaska Department of Corrections’ annual Offender Profile publication. Overall trends saw numbers of probationers and parolees increasing from 2002 to 2012, then decreasing through 2016. The majority of probationers and parolees are between 20 and 34 years old. The trend for both males and females followed the overall trend, increasing from 2002 to 2012 then decreasing. On average, from 2002 to 2016, Alaska Natives were 26.7% of the probation and parole population, Asian & or Pacific Islander 4.1%, Black 8.7%, and White 56.1%.
    • Property Crime in Alaska 1985–2017

      Kisarauskas, Yevgenii (Alaska Justice Information Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-03-07)
      This fact sheet describes Alaska property crime trends from 1985 through 2017, with a focus on motor vehicle theft rate trends. Overall property crime in Alaska increased by 28.6% from 2011 to 2017. Burglary and larceny theft increased moderately, but motor vehicle theft rates tripled from the lowest recorded rate 2011 to the highest recorded rate in 2017. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Value of Stolen Property Reported in Alaska, 1985–2016

      Reamey, Random (Alaska Justice Information Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-01-22)
      This fact sheet presents data on the value of stolen property reported in Alaska from 1985 to 2016 as reported in the Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. Overall, the 31-year trend reveals that the total value of stolen property in Alaska was relatively static with a trough beginning in 2008 and rising in 2014. The increase in stolen property value from 2014 to 2016 was mainly due to increases in the aggregate values of stolen motor vehicles and miscellaneous items. After adjusting for inflation, the highest total value of stolen property was recorded in 1990 at $61,651,724. The lowest total value of stolen property recorded was in 2011 at $22,189,499. Of the different property types, motor vehicles represented the largest value and share of stolen property. On average, motor vehicles were 53.7% ($24,246,790 per year) of the total value of stolen property.