Recent Submissions

  • "You must always tell two": an examination of the Iñupiaq tale of "Aliŋnaq" and Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus

    Zibell, Chelsey; Burleson, Derick; Reilly, Terence; Ruppert, James; Hill, Sean (2015-05)
    This essay focuses specifically on a comparison between the Alaskan Inupiaq story of "Aliŋnaq" and Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus. "Aliŋnaq" comes in many variations and is known chiefly throughout the North American Arctic. Titus Andronicus is one of Shakespeare's less popular plays. But both stories, through the themes of agency, cannibalism, silencing and transformation, show the reader a world out of order, a world that must be set right. This comparison takes off from Joseph Campbell's concept of the monomyth, in which all stories are said to follow a basic plotline. In addition, this text serves to take a work of traditional ethnic folklore and bring it to its rightful place as literature alongside accepted canonized western literature.
  • The malleability of disciplinary identity

    Mericle, Megan E.; Stanley, Sarah; Farmer, Daryl; Brightwell, Gerri; Harney, Eileen (2017-05)
    This paper tracks the progress of a beginning undergraduate writer's disciplinary becoming. Much research in disciplinary identity focuses on graduate students and advanced undergraduate writers; however, sites of disciplinary identity formation also occur early on during the required first-year writing course. These sites are crucial because they inform the student writer's entrance into the academic conversation, and reveal the extent to which early assumptions about disciplinary roles affects further disciplinary identity formation. Drawing from Ivanič's framework of writer identity, this case study reveals the ever-shifting tensions of "disciplinary becoming." The analysis captures how a writer's discursive self shifts from a static disciplinary identity to a more malleable disciplinary identity through a cross-analysis of two separate writing assignments in order to learn how the student's petroleum engineer identity is performed, contradicted and re-negotiated. I argue that this shift will enable writing knowledge transfer and overall identity formation.