• The Fairbanks Four: hopeless innocence and the flawed system that escorted them to stagnant wrongful convictions

      Hill, Meghan (2014)
      This project explores factors that lead to wrongful convictions with a case study from 1997 on the sensitive claim of innocence on the Fairbanks, Alaska community: The John Hartman murder. As the representative model throughout the project, this sexual assault and murder case of the accused Fairbanks Four will be examined. Through a multi-disciplinary scope, the topic will be approached through numerous accounts of research, interviews, and field-work. By dissecting the Fairbanks Four case and applying it to the research of the burdensome appeals process, the supporting factors are apparent in the practices that lead to wrongful convictions. In the synopsis, methods that lead to convictions, as well as the inconsistent wavering time table, will be disclosed. Further, counter methods to tactics currently practiced and how to avoid time delays of such a rigorous and often hopeless process will also be included. With underdog defense organizations such as The Innocence Project and The Alaska Innocence Project growth and expansion, we increasingly see success in the overturn of wrongful convictions throughout the United States. This paper will argue and highlight the systemic faults in the current convictions process and identify recommendations to modify such faults in relation to the case study of the Fairbanks Four.
    • Fairbanks juvenile recidivism case study: a comparison of criminogenic needs and case planning of recidivists and non-recidivists

      Dompeling, Tracy A. (2015-08)
      Research has shown that addressing criminogenic needs of offenders, both juvenile and adult, can reduce the likelihood of recidivism. Utilizing the Risk Need Responsivity theory (Andrews, Bonta, & Hoge, 1990; Andrews, Zinger, et al., 1990), the hypothesis for this small case study of youth recidivist and non-recidivists in interior Alaska was developed to compare data to determine if what is identified in research models to reduce recidivism correlated to what was applied in practice with juvenile offenders. Specifically this comparative case study intended to show that youth who had case plans which were identified to be "inadequate," that they had fewer than 75% of the identified criminogenic needs from their YLS/CMI addressed on their case plan, would be more likely to recidivate. Further, youth who had case plans which were identified to be "adequate," that they had greater than 75% of their identified criminogenic needs from their YLS/CMI addressed on their case plan, would be less likely to recidivate.The case study also compared case plans of recidivists and non-recidivists in the use of dynamic criminogenic needs and any subsequent impact on recidivism. After the statistical analysis of both the efficacy of case plans addressing individual criminogenic needs as well as the efficacy of case plans addressing dynamic criminogenic needs and their impact on reduction of recidivism, only the later analysis of dynamic criminogenic needs was able to reject the null hypothesis; that inclusion of criminogenic needs on a case plan has no impact on recidivism.
    • Helping veterans through outreach

      Ebersole, Rodney B.; Daku, Mike; Boldt, Frank; Duke, Rob (2017-12)
      The present Master's project seeks to develop a better understanding of Veterans and what they are going through. Research methods include extensive data on the high suicide rates of Veterans. Veteran and service members are in need of a service to them that will address the issue of suicide and what can be done to help and eliminate this problem. The programs that need to be designed to help needs should be in locations that have Veteran populations so as to serve them with their needs. Ultimately, Veterans Affairs (VA) officials have boosted their mental health personnel and suicide hotline staff in recent years, but at this time their data does not reflect it helping Veterans getting the help that they so desperately need.
    • A historical review of forensic science in law enforcement: implications for the enhancements of forensic science within the State of Alaska

      Pomeroy, Shasta (2017)
      According to the 2015 census records presented on the State of Alaska website, Alaska has a population of 737,625 residents. The state of Alaska spans 586,412 square miles (State of Alaska, 2016, 1). With such a vast state, the need for enough law enforcement services is exceedingly important. The Alaskan 2013 Uniform Crime Report (UCR) asserts that there are 1,331 law enforcement officers within the state. Alaskan law enforcement officers have to conduct crime scene evidence collection and analysis along with other necessary tasks such as securing the crime scene, detaining suspects, and rendering aid to victims. With only the Alaska State Troopers, local law enforcement agencies, and the Alaska State Crime Laboratory in the state of Alaska assessing crime scenes, it is the purpose of this research to document the need for more on-scene forensic science services in Alaska. This research will conclude with the proposal of implementation of dedicated on-scene forensic services provided by non-sworn on-scene technicians within the current Alaskan law enforcement structure. This program will allow for a natural expansion of forensic science services in Alaska.
    • Learning to work and think for life

      Sprankle, Elizabeth; Daku, Mike; Duke, J. Robert; Boldt, Frank (2019-08)
      This paper explores literature related to the use of restorative discipline and restorative practices in school communities. It draws heavily on the ideas presented in Ron and Roxanne Claassens’ book, Discipline that Restores, in order to illustrate why students, staff, administrators, families and the community connected to a traditional public high school, such as West Valley High School, in Fairbanks, Alaska, would benefit from shifting to a restorative approach to discipline. The paper also examines numerous sources to demonstrate why embedding lessons related to social justice and restorative practices into content areas is logical and beneficial and attainable and that both these embedded courses and this approach to discipline support and foster content related to a Career Technical Education pathway focused on Education, Public & Human Services.
    • Police culture: does culture prevent proper policing?

      McGuffin, Michael; Duke, J. Robert; May, Jeff; Boldt, Frank (2018)
      This project is about identifying the key issues that police officers face in today's society. There is an emphasis on community policing and to adjust police training to account for the strong pull of the police subculture. The main purpose of this project is to strengthen the bonds between the police and the community and changing how officers approach their interactions within the community. The end goal is to alleviate community concerns that police officers are out to get them while also alleviating the concerns officers have that the community hates them. This project will attempt to quell those concerns while proposing a solution that benefits both officers, the police department, and the community.
    • Preventing recidivism by using the theory of reintegrative shaming with conferences

      Enters, Patrick G.; Jarrett, Brian; Daku, Michael; Duke, J. Robert; May, Jeff (2013-06)
      Driving while intoxicated in the United States is a major problem with more than 31 percent of national driving fatalities caused by intoxicated drivers. The purpose of the present study is to identify the possibility between the use of reintegrative shaming with conferences and the likelihood that it will reduce the recidivism of driving while intoxicated. The study explores John Brathwaite's theory on reintegrative shaming and how that theory applies in conferences. The emerging theory o f Storylines from Robert Agnew is also explored in its importance when conducting these conferences. Studies conducted in Australia, Pennsylvania, Kansas and Alaska have all suggested that the use of conferences, especially those which utilize reintegrative shaming and reintegrating offenders back into the community reduces the recidivism rates. The research found in this article helps point future studies to examine offenders in a longer term after they have completed reintegrative shaming programs and conferences.
    • Segregated prisoners: nature imagery project in prisons as a program option

      Schwankl, Kristine (2018)
      Solitary confinement can be summarized as the state of being alone in a prison cell for 22 to 24 hours a day with minimal human interaction, little to no natural light, property restrictions, visitation constraints, and the inability to participate in group activities and communal meals. Solitary confinement can go by many names; it can be referred to as lockdown, Security or Special Housing Units (SHU), Special Management Units (SMU), administrative segregation, disciplinary or punitive segregation, restrictive housing, or "the hole". Solitary confinement is utilized for many purposes, primarily for the health and safety of themselves and others. It was first intended as a means of rehabilitation. However, instead, it has contributed to negative psychological and physiological effects on prisoners. There is argument for and against the use of solitary confinement and reformation efforts are being made to reduce solitary confinement. In an attempt to provide programming to segregated prisoners and reduce the amount of time that prisoners are in their cells, various correctional institutions have implemented nature imagery programs to reduce violent behavior and physiological states. Nature Imagery in Prisons Project (NIPP) was the first program of its kind and has laid the groundwork for other correctional institutions to follow. Programs such as this are designed for segregated prisoners and are used as a means of rehabilitation for these individuals as they prepare for their return to the community or to general prison population.
    • Tackling revenge porn: mitigating destructive behaviors among minors through education

      Spencer, Dominique Nichelle; Boldt, Frank; Duke, J. Robert; Boldt, Frank (2019-08)
      Revenge porn is at the forefront of the American consciousness now more than ever before. The effects of revenge pom are long-lasting for both victims and perpetrators, yet efforts to address these behaviors remain highly unorganized. A combination of victim blaming, an inability to keep up with technology, and poor legislation have made the process of addressing revenge pom extremely challenging. Although anyone can become a victim of revenge pom, this report will focus on the group in our society which is the most susceptible to these risks and the least protected, minors and young adults. Furthermore, this report will delve into the social, psychological, financial, and legal ramifications of participating in revenge pom. Finally, this report will advocate for the implementation of comprehensive sex education programs in schools, because education is the only way to render the excuse of ignorance of the law invalid.