• Alaskan Bush Justice: Legal Centralism Confronts Social Science Research and Village Alaska [1982 revision]

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1982-09)
      This paper traces the history of the bush justice system in rural Alaska, describes the relationship between traditional Alaska Native dispute resolution mechanisms and the state criminal justice system, and analyzes bush justice research between 1970 and 1981 and its effects on state agency policies and changes in the rural justice system. Innovations by researchers were well-received by villagers and field-level professionals, but not by agency policymakers. Hence, most reforms made in the 1970s had vanished by the early 1980s. The author concludes that further reforms will be ineffective unless Alaska Natives are drawn into the decisionmaking process as co-equal players negotiating on legal process from positions of power.
    • Alaskan Bush Justice: Legal Centralism Confronts Social Science Research and Village Alaska [original paper]

      Conn, Stephen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1981-09)
      This paper traces the history of the bush justice system in rural Alaska, describes the relationship between traditional Alaska Native dispute resolution mechanisms and the state criminal justice system, and analyzes bush justice research between 1970 and 1981 and its effects on state agency policies and changes in the rural justice system. Innovations by researchers were well-received by villagers and field-level professionals, but not by agency policymakers. Hence, most reforms made in the 1970s had vanished by the early 1980s. The author concludes that further reforms will be ineffective unless Alaska Natives are drawn into the decisionmaking process as co-equal players negotiating on legal process from positions of power.
    • Converging Science and Practice in Analyzing Evaluation Data

      Johnson, Knowlton W. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1983-03)
      A strategy is presented for converging science and practice which focuses on the needs of scientists and policymakers in analyzing evaluation data. Emphasis is placed on employing powerful statistical techniques that maximize the evaluators' confidence in their results. Attention is also drawn to the need for producing results which can be easily communicated to and interpreted by policymakers. In regard to these requirements, the discussion concerns application of four statistical techniques: factor analysis, Guttman scalogram analysis, multiple classification analysis and cross-break analysis. Each statistical analysis technique is described as to its value in evaluation research for dealing with problems known to inhibit the convergence of science and practice. The application of these techniques is demonstrated by illustrations taken from previous evaluation studies. The paper concludes with implications for stimulating the extent and quality of evaluation use.
    • Utilization of Research in Combating Violence in Alaska: An Ecological Perspective

      Johnson, Knowlton W. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1983-09)
      Research diffusion and use has increasingly become an interest of social scientists and policymakers. This interest on the part of policymakers is evidenced by the results of this study. In particular, high level administrators in 268 human service agencies of Alaska reported moderate to high use of statistics, evaluation studies and other social science research in making pol icy decisions about combating violence. Findings are also presented that point to specific facilitators and inhibitors of research use. The conclusions and policy implications highlight how the results of this research utilization study can direct the formulation of a research and development agenda at the agency and state level.