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dc.contributor.authorConn, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-25T01:46:56Z
dc.date.available2017-03-25T01:46:56Z
dc.date.issued1980
dc.identifier.citationConn, Stephen. (1980). Alcohol Control and Native Alaskans — from the Russians to Statehood: The Early Years — Alcohol Control in Village Alaska. Anchorage, AK: Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage.en_US
dc.identifier.otherJC 7801.02
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/7351
dc.descriptionA revision of this report was incorporated into the monograph "No Need of Gold — Alcohol Control Laws and the Alaska Native Population: From the Russians through the Early Years of Statehood" by Stephen Conn and Antonia Moras (Alaska Historical Commission Studies in History #226, 1986).en_US
dc.description.abstractA persistent thread throughout the legal history of Alaska since Russian contact with the Great Land until the present has been deployment of available legal resources to curb drinking by Alaska Indians and Eskimos. The long-held social belief on the part of white colonialists and government agents that Alaska Natives could not drink and became wild persons when intoxicated was translated into an unrelenting legal practice of focusing law and available legal resources on control of Native drinking and prosecution of those who supplied Natives with drink. / Even during four periods of territory-wide prohibition, the prohibition was enforced against Natives and suppliers to Natives, while enforcement was indifferent or nonexistent against territorial whites. / The historical overview confirms the propositions set forth by MacAndrew and Edgerton (1969) that American.Indians can trace current drinking problems to the prior expectations implemented as government policy. It also suggests that dependence on law only as a mechanism to change drinking problems can, in fact, exacerbate drinking problems and create among the impacted group problems with alcohol which may not otherwise have existed. / The dependence on law as a vehicle for social control in Alaska in recent years may relate to an absence of alternatives. However, this singular dependence on law enforcement flows from a "grand tradition" of governmental paternalism which can be interpreted as being as much a cause of drinking problems among Natives as a solution to them.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipReport prepared pursuant to Grant No. 1 H84 AA03183-01 from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.en_US
dc.description.tableofcontentsABSTRACT / REPORT / Russian Period / The Military Period / The Navy and the Missionaries / The Revenue Cutters / Continuation of Indian Police-Colonialism American Style / Evolution of the Alaska System in 1899 and a New Approach to Liquor Control / Liquor / Enforcement in the Early Twentieth Century / Which Indians? / Reports from the Field / An Agent Reports / Bone-Dry in Alaska / Beyond Prohibition / The Military – The New Sourdoughs / Implications for Our Study / White Law and Native Law / Footnotes / APPENDICES / 1. Report of Governor of Alaska [1916]. Liquor Traffic Among the Natives / 2. Arrests by Special Officers, Fiscal year ended June 30th, 1925 / 3. Letter to Gov. Geo. A. Parks from Special Officer H.E. Seneff, July 1, 1930 / 4. Letter to Gov. John W. Troy from Special Officer H.E. Seneff, July 1, 1933 / BIBLIOGRAPHYen_US
dc.format.extent80 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJustice Center, University of Alaska Anchorageen_US
dc.subjectAlaska historyen_US
dc.subjectAlaska Nativesen_US
dc.subjectalcohol & alcohol abuseen_US
dc.subjectbush justiceen_US
dc.subjecthistoryen_US
dc.subjectlaw enforcementen_US
dc.subjectrace & racismen_US
dc.subjectrural justiceen_US
dc.subjecttraditional law waysen_US
dc.titleAlcohol Control and Native Alaskans — from the Russians to Statehood: The Early Years — Alcohol Control in Village Alaskaen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-07T01:06:05Z


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