• Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 34, No. 1 (Summer 2017)  

      Rosay, André B.; Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      The Summer 2017 print edition of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on psychological and physical abuse against women in Alaska who are aged 60 or older and on the consequences of Alaska's lack of capacity to treat mental illness in the community. An editor's note describes changes to the publication and invites online subscriptions. The Summer 2017 online edition includes expanded versions of print stories, an additional story on a collaborative problem-solving process involving liquor stores in an Anchorage neighborhood and a farewell from André B. Rosay, who served as Justice Center director from 2007 to 2017.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 34, No. 2 (Fall 2017)

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Cravez, Pamela; Payne, Troy C.; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-10-18)
      The Fall 2017 print edition of the Alaska Justice Forum features two stories on crime rates — in relation to criminal justice reform and in relation to police staffing — that caution using crime rates as a single factor to determine policy. A story on Crisis Intervention Teams shows how specialized responses are helping law enforcement deal with calls from individuals with mental illness and/or substance use disorders. The Fall 2017 online edition includes expanded versions of print stories and a video (with transcript) on property crime rates in Alaska.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 34, No. 4 (Spring 2018)  

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Cravez, Pamela; UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      The Spring 2018 print edition of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on Village Public Safety Officers (VPSOs) as first responders in sexual abuse of a minor and sexual assault cases, findings from the 2014–2015 Alaska Victimization Survey for the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands, Alaska's progress on the Sexual Assault Kit Initiative, and a review of a book on the Sequential Intercept Model, which offers conceptual points at which a person with serious mental illness could be diverted from the criminal justice system. The Spring 2018 online edition includes expanded versions of print stories.
    • Alaska’s Lack of Psychiatric Beds and Consequences

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      Patients experiencing psychiatric emergencies referred to Alaska Psychiatric Institute (API) in Anchorage must frequently must wait four to six days before being admitted. API, with 80 beds, is the state’s sole psychiatric hospital and provider of inpatient services. Two additional Designated Evaluation and Treatment (DET) hospitals — Fairbanks Memorial Hospital (20 beds) and Juneau’s Bartlett Regional Hospital (12 beds) — provide care for acute psychiatric emergencies. According to a recent privatization report there is no infrastructure in Alaska to support longer, more complex intervention as a routine form of inpatient treatment. This has not always been the case. This article traces the history of Alaska mental health policy and discusses the consequences of the lack of capacity to treat mental illness in the community, including growing numbers entering the corrections system.
    • Crisis Intervention Teams Assist Law Enforcement

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-10-18)
      The Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) is a police-based, first responders’ pre-arrest jail diversion model for individuals with mental illness and/or substance abuse disorder. A new CIT coalition is being developed in Matanuska-Susitna Borough. The online version of the article also includes additional information about specialized police responses.
    • Sequential Intercept Model: Framework for a ‘Wicked Problem’

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      The Sequential Intercept Model offers conceptual points at which a person with serious mental illness could be diverted from the criminal justice system and into community-based treatment. This article reviews the 2015 book "The Sequential Intercept Model and Criminal Justice" (New York: Oxford University Press), which looks at the success of programs along the intercept continuum. A workshop on the model sponsored by the Alaska Department of Corrections will be held in Anchorage in May 2018.
    • When Mental Illness Becomes a Police Matter

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-10-18)
      Mental illness is not a police matter in and of itself and most people with mental illness (MI) are not involved in the criminal justice system. When police do interact with an individual with MI, care needs to be taken not to label the person as the problem but to focus on behavior that causes harm to self and others.