• Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 34, No. 1 (Summer 2017)  

      Rosay, André B.; Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      The Summer 2017 print edition of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on psychological and physical abuse against women in Alaska who are aged 60 or older and on the consequences of Alaska's lack of capacity to treat mental illness in the community. An editor's note describes changes to the publication and invites online subscriptions. The Summer 2017 online edition includes expanded versions of print stories, an additional story on a collaborative problem-solving process involving liquor stores in an Anchorage neighborhood and a farewell from André B. Rosay, who served as Justice Center director from 2007 to 2017.
    • Alaska’s Lack of Psychiatric Beds and Consequences

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      Patients experiencing psychiatric emergencies referred to Alaska Psychiatric Institute (API) in Anchorage must frequently must wait four to six days before being admitted. API, with 80 beds, is the state’s sole psychiatric hospital and provider of inpatient services. Two additional Designated Evaluation and Treatment (DET) hospitals — Fairbanks Memorial Hospital (20 beds) and Juneau’s Bartlett Regional Hospital (12 beds) — provide care for acute psychiatric emergencies. According to a recent privatization report there is no infrastructure in Alaska to support longer, more complex intervention as a routine form of inpatient treatment. This has not always been the case. This article traces the history of Alaska mental health policy and discusses the consequences of the lack of capacity to treat mental illness in the community, including growing numbers entering the corrections system.
    • Commentary: Collaborative Problem Solving with Liquor Stores

      Chamard, Sharon (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      This article recounts the history of a successful community-based collaborative problem-solving process in the Fairview neighborhood in Anchorage to resolve a seemingly intractable public disorder problem associated with two area liquor stores. The story is an example of the "co-production of public safety" — residents actively working together with police and others to solve neighborhood problems, rather than waiting passively for police or other government officials to find solutions. The author is a member of the leadership of the Fairview Community Council and an academic and researcher with expertise in using community partnerships to address public safety concerns.
    • Director's Farewell

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      Dr. André B. Rosay bids farewell to the UAA Justice Center, where he has been director since 2007. Dr. Rosay has been appointed associate dean for academic and student affairs in the College of Health at University of Alaska Anchorage.
    • Editor's Note

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      Pamela Cravez, new editor of the Alaska Justice Forum, announces changes to the publication, including an updated design and enhanced online presence.
    • Older Women Face Psychological and Physical Abuse

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      This article examines psychological and physical abuse against women in Alaska who are aged 60 or older and compares these rates to national rates. Psychological abuse includes expressive aggression by intimate partners and coercive control by intimate partners. Physical abuse includes physical violence by intimate partners. It also includes sexual violence, by both intimate partners and non-intimate partners. Estimates are provided for both psychological and physical abuse. Alaska estimates come from the 2010–2015 Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS) and national estimates from the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). Results show that one in nine Alaskan women aged 60 or older (11.5%) experienced psychological or physical abuse in the past year. These rates are all significantly higher than national rates.