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dc.contributor.authorBiddlecomb, Mark Edward
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-27T23:21:30Z
dc.date.available2017-11-27T23:21:30Z
dc.date.issued1992-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/7995
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1992en_US
dc.description.abstractSnow depth and hardness strongly influenced selection of feeding zones, (i.e., those areas used for foraging), in late winter by both muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) and caribou (Rangifer tarandus grand) in northern Alaska. Snow in feeding zones was shallower and softer than in surrounding zones. Depth of feeding craters was less than the average snow depth in feeding zones. Moist sedge tundra types were used most often by muskoxen, and their diet, based on microhistological analysis of feces, was dominated by graminoids. Moist sedge and Dryas tundra types were most often used by caribou; lichens and evergreen shrubs were the major constituents of their diet. Despite selection of moist sedge tundra types by both muskoxen and caribou in late winter, dietary and spatial overlap was minimal.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectMuskoxen_US
dc.subjectAlaskaen_US
dc.subjectCaribouen_US
dc.titleComparative patterns of winter habitat use by muskoxen and caribou in northern Alaskaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.degreems
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-05T15:05:23Z


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