Recent Submissions

  • PEDESTRIAN TRAVEL-TIME MAPS FOR WHITTIER, ALASKA: An anisotropic model to support tsunami evacuation planning

    Gardine, Lea; Nicolsky, Dmitry (2019-05)
    Tsunami-induced pedestrian evacuation for the community of Whittier is evaluated using an anisotropic modeling approach developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is based on path-distance algorithms and accounts for variations in land cover and directionality in the slope of terrain. We model evacuation of pedestrians to exit points from the tsunami hazard zone boundary. The pedestrian travel is restricted to the roads only. Results presented here are intended to provide guidance to local emergency management agencies for tsunami inundation assessment, evacuation planning, and public education to mitigate future tsunami hazards.
  • PEDESTRIAN TRAVEL-TIME MAPS FOR SITKA, ALASKA: An anisotropic model to support tsunami evacuation planning

    Macpherson, Amy; Gardine, Lea; Nicolsky, Dmitry (2020-06)
    Tsunami-induced pedestrian evacuation for Sitka is evaluated using an anisotropic modeling approach developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is based on path-distance algorithms and accounts for variations in land cover and directionality in the slope of terrain. We model evacuation of pedestrians to exit points from the tsunami hazard zone. The pedestrian travel is restricted to the roads only. Results presented here are intended to provide guidance to local emergency management agencies for tsunami inundation assessment, evacuation planning, and public education to mitigate future tsunami hazards.
  • PEDESTRIAN TRAVEL-TIME MAPS FOR PERRYVILLE, ALASKA: An anisotropic model to support tsunami evacuation planning

    Gardine, Lea; Nicolsky, Dmitry (2019-08)
    Tsunami-induced pedestrian evacuation for the community of Perryville is evaluated using an anisotropic modeling approach developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is based on path-distance algorithms and accounts for variations in land cover and directionality in the slope of terrain. We model evacuation of pedestrians to exit points located at the tsunami hazard zone boundary. Pedestrian travel-time maps are computed for two cases: i) travel to an existing evacuating shelter and ii) travel to either the evacuation or an alternative shelter. Results presented here are intended to provide guidance to local emergency management agencies for tsunami inundation assessment, evacuation planning, and public education to mitigate future tsunami hazards.
  • PEDESTRIAN TRAVEL-TIME MAPS FOR CORDOVA, ALASKA: An anisotropic model to support tsunami evacuation planning

    Macpherson, Amy; Gardine, Lea; Nicolsky, Dmitry (2020-06)
    Tsunami-induced pedestrian evacuation for Cordova is evaluated using an anisotropic modeling approach developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is based on path-distance algorithms and accounts for variations in land cover and directionality in the slope of terrain. We model evacuation of pedestrians to exit points from the tsunami hazard zone. The pedestrian travel is restricted to the roads only. Results presented here are intended to provide guidance to local emergency management agencies for tsunami inundation assessment, evacuation planning, and public education to mitigate future tsunami hazards.
  • Seismicity and Stresses in the Kantishna Seismic Cluster, Central Alaska

    Burris, Lea A. (2007-12)
    The Kantishna Cluster is an enigmatic and energetic cluster of earthquakes located in central Alaska, just to the northwest of Mt. McKinley/Denali and adjacent to the Denali Fault. The Kantishna Cluster has no visible fault traces, and is often speculated to have a connection to the Denali Fault. The Kantishna Cluster is located at a hub of tectonic activity including Bering Block rotation to the west, bookshelf faulting to the northeast, and rotation of southern Alaska due to Pacific plate convergence to the south. The intention of this study was to broaden the knowledge base about the Kantishna Cluster and use the Mw 7.9 Denali Fault earthquake to find a relationship between the cluster and the Denali Fault Zone. Rate calculations in conjunction with z- and b-value changes show that the Denali Fault earthquake had little influence on the seismicity of the Kantishna Cluster, with the exception being the southern most portion closest to the Denali Fault. The highly variable background rate of seismicity in the Kantishna Cluster makes seeing changes in the seismicity difficult. Stress tensor inversions suggest a change in the stresses in the Kantishna Cluster; however, triangle diagram comparisons show that the pattern of earthquake mechanism types did not change. Coulomb stress change calculations predict small changes that were not observed in the data. Double difference hypocentral relocations show that the cloud of earthquakes collapses down to several distinct features. Seismicity trends resolved from hypocentral relocations made it possible to infer fault planes or planar structures in the region. The newly uncovered structures are utilized in the formation of a model involving two wedges to describe the seismicity in the Kantishna Cluster. The two wedges are being “squeezed” in opposite directions accommodating for compression across the cluster due to Pacific plate convergence.
  • Maritime Guidance for Distant and Local Source Tsunami Events: Whittier Harbor, Alaska

    Nicolsky, Dmitry; Suleimani, Elena; Gardine, Lea (2020-02-27)
  • Maritime Guidance for Distant and Local Source Tsunami Events: Valdez Harbor, Alaska

    Nicolsky, Dmitry; Suleimani, Elena; Gardine, Lea (2020-02-27)
  • Maritime Guidance for Distant and Local Source Tsunami Events: Seward Harbor, Alaska

    Nicolsky, Dmitry; Suleimani, Elena; Gardine, Lea (2020-02-27)
  • Maritime Guidance for Distant and Local Source Tsunami Events: Seldovia Harbor, Alaska

    Nicolsky, Dmitry; Suleimani, Elena; Gardine, Lea (2020-02-27)
  • Maritime Guidance for Distant and Local Source Tsunami Events: Homer Harbor, Alaska

    Nicolsky, Dmitry; Suleimani, Elena; Gardine, Lea (2020-02-27)
  • Maritime Guidance for Distant and Local Source Tsunami Events: Cordova Harbor, Alaska

    Nicolsky, Dmitry; Suleimani, Elena; Gardine, Lea (2020-02-27)
  • Pedestrian Travel-Time Maps for Unalaska/Dutch Harbor, Alaska: An anisotropic model to support tsunami evacuation planning

    Macpherson, A.E.; Nicolsky, D.J.; Koehler, R.D. (2016-07-18)
    Tsunami-induced pedestrian evacuation for the community of Unalaska/Dutch Harbor is evaluated using an anisotropic modeling approach developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is based on pathdistance algorithms and accounts for variations in land cover and directionality in the slope of terrain. We model evacuation of pedestrians to the tsunami hazard zone boundary and to predetermined assembly areas. Pedestrian travel-time maps are computed for two cases: for travel across all viable terrain or by roads only. Results presented here are intended to provide guidance to local emergency management agencies for tsunami inundation assessment, evacuation planning, and public education to mitigate future tsunami hazards. This report was funded by the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program grant to the Alaska Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and University of Alaska Fairbanks from the Department of Commerce/National Oceanic at Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). This does not constitute an endorsement by Alaska Earthquake Center (AEC) or NOAA.
  • Pedestrian Travel-Time Maps for King Cove, Alaska: An anisotropic model to support tsunami evacuation planning

    Macpherson, A.E.; Nicolsky, D.J.; Koehler, R.D. (2016-07-18)
    Tsunami-induced pedestrian evacuation for the community of King Cove is evaluated using an anisotropic modeling approach developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The applied method is based on path-distance algorithms and accounts for variations in land cover and directionality in the slope of terrain. We model evacuation of pedestrians to the tsunami hazard zone boundary and to predetermined assembly areas. The pedestrian travel-time maps are computed for two cases: for travel across all viable terrain or by roads only. Results presented here are intended to provide guidance to local emergency management agencies for tsunami inundation assessment, evacuation planning, and public education to mitigate future tsunami hazards. This report was funded by the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program grant to the Alaska Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and University of Alaska Fairbanks from the Department of Commerce/National Oceanic at Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). This does not constitute an endorsement by Alaska Earthquake Center (AEC) or NOAA.
  • Pedestrian Travel-Time Maps for Homer, Alaska: An anisotropic model to support tsunami evacuation planning

    Macpherson, A.E.; Nicolsky, D.J.; Koehler, R.D. (2016-07-18)
    Tsunami-induced pedestrian evacuation for the community of Homer is evaluated using an anisotropic modeling approach developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is based on path-distance algorithms and accounts for variations in land cover and directionality in the slope of terrain. We model evacuation of pedestrians to the tsunami hazard zone boundary and to predetermined assembly areas. The pedestrian travel-time maps are computed for two cases: for travel across all variable terrain or by roads only. Results presented here are intended to provide guidance to local emergency management agencies in tsunami inundation assessment, evacuation planning, and public education to mitigate future tsunami hazards. This report was funded by the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program grant to the Alaska Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and University of Alaska Fairbanks from the Department of Commerce/National Oceanic at Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). This does not constitute an endorsement by Alaska Earthquake Center (AEC) or NOAA.
  • Pedestrian Travel-Time Maps for Chignik, Alaska: An anisotropic model to support tsunami evacuation planning

    Macpherson, A.E.; Nicolsky, D.J.; Koehler, R.D. (2016-07-18)
    Tsunami-induced pedestrian evacuation for the community of Chignik is evaluated using an anisotropic modeling approach developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is based on path-distance algorithms and accounts for variations in land cover and directionality in the slope of terrain. We model evacuation of pedestrians to the tsunami hazard zone boundary and to predetermined assembly areas. Pedestrian travel-time maps are computed for two cases: for travel across all viable terrain or by roads only. Results presented here are intended to provide guidance to local emergency management agencies for tsunami inundation assessment, evacuation planning, and public education to mitigate future tsunami hazards. This report was funded by the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program grant to the Alaska Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and University of Alaska Fairbanks from the Department of Commerce/National Oceanic at Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). This does not constitute an endorsement by Alaska Earthquake Center (AEC) or NOAA.
  • An improved glimpse into earthquake activity in northeastern Alaska

    Buurman, Helena (2018-09-04)
    The northeastern Brooks Range is long known to be seismically active, but meaningful analysis of the earthquake activity has been limited by the lack of instrumentation. The seismic record in the area dates back to the mid-1970s, and shows a broad northeast-trending zone of earthquake activity. Improvements made in the past 20 years to the permanent seismic network along with new data collected by the temporary USArray network of seismometers located throughout northeastern Alaska have dramatically lowered the earthquake detection threshold in the area. It is now possible to identify patterns within the earthquake data including spatial distribution and occurrence rates, which indicate the presence of previously unrecognized active fault systems. I highlight several such features within the data: a 110 km (60 mi) line of recurring earthquakes near the village of Beaver that strongly suggest a singular fault system; a cluster of earthquakes near the village of Venetie that are likely occurring on a complex active fault system; a years-long mainshock-aftershock sequence of earthquakes near the Draanjik River that began in 2006; and two swarms separated by 50 km (30 mi) in distance and 7 years near the Hulahula River.