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dc.contributor.authorPeter, Evon
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-11T00:44:53Z
dc.date.available2018-01-11T00:44:53Z
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/8076
dc.descriptionMaster's Project (M.A.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2016en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper will cover concepts of leadership in Indigenous contexts, Indigenous community development strategies, and Indigenous community healing and wellness, as they apply to the history and framework of the Northwest Arctic Institute (NWAI) program. The NWAI is a weeklong culturally based prevention program designed for Alaska Native peoples. The program incorporates Indigenous knowledge and pedagogy into the sharing of core teachings about resilience, adaptation, and cultural identity. It covers the impacts of rapid social, cultural, and political changes on the lives of Alaska Native peoples. The NWAI is for adults interested in furthering their own personal healing and in working on wellness within their families and communities. This paper explains an Indigenous approach to healing and the theoretical framework for supporting community level capacity building models among Alaska Native peoples. The paper also describes the NWAI planning process and methodology. In addition to the paper, which will meet completion requirements for the Masters in Rural Development at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, I will co-produce a documentary film on the NWAI to share our experience with the intention of raising awareness, fostering conversation, and inspiring others to action. The analysis and descriptions are based on the my life experience as an Alaska Native leader. I have served Indigenous communities for twenty years in roles spanning ten unique capacities, including education administrator, tribal administrator, tribal chief, national tribal non-profit executive director, for-profit Alaska Native owned corporate chief executive officer, tribal renewable energy manager, tribal wellness manager, and as a board member to regional, national, and international Indigenous organizations. The theoretical framework for leadership selection is derived from my work in developing, planning, and leading facilitation of the Northwest Arctic Institute, which was based on Indigenous youth leadership development and prevention experience at the local, national, and international levels. This history is covered within the Introduction and Program History sections.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectAlaska Nativesen_US
dc.subjectLeadershipen_US
dc.subjectStudy and teachingen_US
dc.subjectAlaskaen_US
dc.subjectSuicideen_US
dc.subjectPreventionen_US
dc.subjectSubstance abuseen_US
dc.subjectRural developmenten_US
dc.titleThe Northwest Arctic institute: an indigenous approach to preventionen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dc.type.degreema
dc.identifier.departmentCenter for Cross Cultural Studies
dc.contributor.committeeWexler, Lisa
dc.contributor.committeeRamos, Judith
dc.contributor.committeeLeonard, Beth
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-05T15:07:57Z


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