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dc.contributor.authorRawson, Timothy Mark
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-04T21:29:22Z
dc.date.available2018-06-04T21:29:22Z
dc.date.issued1994
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/8514
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1994
dc.description.abstractThe decision in the 1930s by the National Park Service to quit eliminating predatory animals in parks arose from evolving attitudes among scientists toward predation, but had little public support. Of the various parks, only Mount McKinley National Park still held wolves, and the National Park Service received considerable opposition to wolf protection from the eastern Camp Fire Club of America and from Alaskans. The former desired permanent protection from wolves for the park's Dall sheep, while the latter could not understand protecting wolves when, throughout Alaska, efforts were made to minimize wolves. Using material from the National Archives and Alaskan sources, this historical study examines the role of public opinion as the Park Service attempted to respond to its critics and still adhere to its protective faunal management philosophy, in what was the nation's first argument over offering sanctuary to our most charismatic predator. <p>
dc.subjectAmerican history
dc.subjectForestry
dc.titleAlaska's First Wolf Controversy: Predator And Prey In Mount McKinley National Park, 1930-1953.
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.degreema
dc.contributor.chairCole, Terrence
dc.contributor.committeeRead, Colin
dc.contributor.committeeErickson, Karen
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-05T15:49:59Z


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