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Effects Of Migratory Geese On Nitrogen Availability And Primary Productivity In Subarctic Barley Fields

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dc.contributor.author Pugin, Jennifer Adrienne
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-06T23:30:45Z
dc.date.available 2018-06-06T23:30:45Z
dc.date.issued 1996
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11122/8528
dc.description Thesis (M.S.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1996
dc.description.abstract Agricultural areas are important for migratory geese, providing easy access to high energy foods. Geese affect agricultural production by removing biomass and by depositing fecal nutrients. This study used $\sp{15}$N as a tracer to examine the quantitative effects of fecal nitrogen contributions on agricultural production.<p> During winter 1994-95, 12-week lab incubations were conducted to determine net nitrogen and carbon mineralization potentials in soils amended with barley straw, grain, and goose feces. The greatest rates of nitrogen mineralization occurred in the soil amended with goose feces. Carbon mineralization occurred at the greatest rate in the soil amended with grain.<p> In comparison to barley grain and straw, goose feces provided the greatest amount of available nitrogen to the soil and to subsequent crops, and consequently higher barley yields (59 and 62% increase, respectively). However, supplementary fertilizer is still necessary for farmers to obtain maximum barley yields. <p>
dc.subject Agronomy
dc.subject Ecology
dc.subject Soil sciences
dc.title Effects Of Migratory Geese On Nitrogen Availability And Primary Productivity In Subarctic Barley Fields
dc.type Thesis
dc.type.degree ms
dc.contributor.chair Sparrow, Stephen


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