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dc.contributor.authorZhuang, Qianlai
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-13T21:25:31Z
dc.date.available2018-06-13T21:25:31Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/8639
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2001
dc.description.abstractA Soil Thermal Model (STM) with the capability to operate with a 0.5-day internal time step and to be driven with monthly input data was developed for applications with large-scale ecosystem models. The use of monthly climate inputs to drive the STM resulted in an error of less than 1�C in the upper organic soil layer and in an accurate simulation of seasonal active layer dynamics. Uncertainty analyses identified that soil temperature estimates of the upper organic layer were most sensitive to variability in parameters that described snow thermal conductivity, moss thickness, and moss thermal conductivity. The STM was coupled to the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM), and the performance of the STM-TEM was verified for the simulation of soil temperatures in applications to black spruce, white spruce, aspen, and tundra sites. A 1�C error in the temperature of the upper organic soil layer had little influence on the carbon dynamics simulated for a black spruce site. Application of the model across the range of black spruce ecosystems in North America demonstrated that the STM-TEM has the capability to operate over temporal and spatial domains that consider substantial variations in surface climate. To consider how fire disturbance interacts with climate change and permafrost dynamics, the STM was updated to more fully evaluate how these factors influence ecosystem dynamics during stand development. The ability of the model to simulate seasonal patterns of soil temperature, gross primary production, and ecosystem respiration, and the age-dependent pattern of above-ground vegetation carbon storage was verified. The model was applied to a post-fire chronosequence in interior Alaska and was validated with estimates of soil temperature, soil respiration, and soil carbon storage that were based on measurements of these variables in 1997. Sensitivity analyses indicate that the growth of moss, changes in the depth of the organic layer, and nitrogen fixation should be represented in models that simulate the effects of fire disturbance in boreal forests. Furthermore, the sensitivity analyses revealed that soil drainage and fire severity should be considered in spatial application of these models to simulate carbon dynamics at landscape to regional scales.
dc.subjectEcology
dc.subjectBiogeochemistry
dc.subjectEnvironmental science
dc.titleModeling The Influences Of Climate Change, Permafrost Dynamics, And Fire Disturbance On Carbon Dynamics Of High -Latitude Ecosystems
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.degreephd
dc.identifier.departmentBiology and Wildlife Department
dc.contributor.chairMcGuire, A. David
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-05T16:08:51Z


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