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dc.contributor.authorTin, Tina
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-14T01:29:10Z
dc.date.available2018-06-14T01:29:10Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/8668
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2003
dc.description.abstractAntarctic sea ice thickness data obtained from drilling on sea ice floes were examined with the goal of enhancing our capability to estimate ice thickness remotely, especially from air- or space-borne altimetry and shipboard visual observations. The state of hydrostatic equilibrium of deformed ice features and the statistical relationships between ice thickness and top surface roughness were examined. Results indicate that ice thickness may be estimated fairly reliably from surface measurements of snow elevation on length scales of ?100 m. Examination of the morphology of deformed ice features show that Antarctic pressure ridges are flatter and less massive than Arctic pressure ridges and that not all surface features (ridge sails) are associated with features underwater (ridge keels). I propose that the differences in morphology are due to differences in sampling strategies, parent ice characteristics and the magnitude and duration of driving forces. As a result of these findings, the existing methodology used to estimate ice thickness from shipboard visual observations was modified to incorporate the probability that a sail is associated with a keel underwater, and the probability that keels may be found under level surfaces. Using the improved methodology, ice thickness was estimated from ship observations data obtained during two cruises in the Ross Sea, Antarctica. The dynamic and thermodynamic processes involved in the development of the ice prior to their observation were examined employing a regional sea ice-mixed layer-pycnocline model. Both our model results and previously published ice core data indicate that thermodynamic thickening is the dominant process that determines the thickness of first year ice in the central Ross Sea, although dynamic thickening also plays a significant role. Ice core data also indicate that snow ice forms a significant proportion of the total ice mass. For ice in the northeast Ross Sea in the summer, model results and evidence from ice core and oceanographic data indicate that dynamic thickening, snow ice formation and bottom melting compete to determine the ice thickness during mid and late winter.
dc.subjectGeophysics
dc.subjectGeology
dc.subjectPhysical oceanography
dc.titleMeasurement And Evolution Of The Thickness Distribution And Morphology Of Deformed Features Of Antarctic Sea Ice
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.degreephd
dc.identifier.departmentDepartment of Geology and Geophysics
dc.contributor.chairJeffries, Martin O.
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-05T16:05:13Z


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