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dc.contributor.authorBurkhart, Peter K.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-25T21:49:14Z
dc.date.available2018-06-25T21:49:14Z
dc.date.issued2018-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/8711
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2018en_US
dc.description.abstractSince WWII, Alaska has witnessed dramatic influxes and reductions in military personnel and funding. This thesis explores the drivers of these events. It applies two theories to analyze the trends: realist theory from international relations and the advocacy coalition framework from public policy. The thesis uses a case study framework and process-tracing to analyze three different time periods in Alaska's history: 1) World War II (1940-1945), 2) the early Cold War era (1950-1958), and 3) the immediate post-Cold War era (1993-1999). This thesis argues that the level of international threat accounts for the United States' decisions to increase or decrease its military forces, while the strength of advocacy coalitions comprised of a diverse array of actors determines the amount of military personnel and funding transferred to Alaska.en_US
dc.description.tableofcontentsChapter 1: Introduction. Chapter 2: History of Military Power in Alaska -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Military Presence from the Purchase of Alaska to World War II Era (1867-1939) -- 2.3 World War II to Pre-Cold War (1940-1949) -- 2.4 The Cold War (1950-1990) -- 2.5 Post-Cold War Era (1991-Current) -- 2.6 Conclusion. Chapter 3: Theory and Methodology -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Realism -- 3.3 Advocacy Coalition Framework -- 3.4 Methodology -- 3.5 Conclusion. Chapter 4: World War II -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 International Politics -- 4.2.1 Realism and International Politics -- 4.2.1.1 A state's interests or a threat to those interests will push a nation into action -- 4.2.1.2 These policies or actions are formed because of competition between states -- 4.2.1.3 Calculation can be used to discover the policies a country will use -- 4.2.1.4 Success of these policies is shown in that a state was both preserved and strengthened -- 4.3 Domestic Politics -- 4.3.1 Advocacy Coalition Framework and Domestic Politics -- 4.3.1.1 The players of the coalition must stay focused and engaged -- 4.3.1.2 The actors in a coalition should come from different levels of government and utilize multiple avenues of influence -- 4.3.1.3 External shocks can help generate policy change -- 4.4 Conclusion. Chapter 5: The Beginning of the Cold War -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 International Politics -- 5.2.1 Realism and International Politic -- 5.2.1.1 A state's interests or a threat to those interests will push a nation into action -- 5.2.1.2 Foreign policies are functions of competition between states -- 5.2.1.3 Calculations are used to discover the policies a country will use -- 5.2.1.4 Success of these policies is shown where a state was both preserved and strengthened -- 5.3 Domestic Politics -- 5.3.1 ACF and Domestic Politics -- 5.3.1.1 The players of the coalition must stay focused and engaged -- 5.3.1.2 The actors in a coalition should come from different levels of government and utilize multiple avenues of influence -- 5.3.1.3 External shocks can help generate policy change -- 5.4 Conclusion. Chapter 6: The Post-Cold War -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 International Politics -- 6.2.1 Realism and International Politics -- 6.2.1.1 A state's interests or a threat to those interests will push a nation into action -- 6.2.1.2 These policies or actions are formed because of competition between states -- 6.2.1.3 Calculation can be used to discover the policies a country will use -- 6.2.1.4 Success of these policies is shown in that a state was both preserved and strengthened -- 6.3 Domestic Politics -- 6.3.1 Advocacy Coalition Framework and Domestic Politics -- 6.3.1.1 The players of the coalition must stay focused and engaged -- 6.3.1.2 The actors in a coalition should come from different levels of government and utilize multiple avenues of influence -- 6.3.1.3 External shocks can help generate policy change -- 6.4 Conclusion. Chapter 7: Conclusion.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectAlaskaen_US
dc.subjectHistory, Militaryen_US
dc.subject20th centuryen_US
dc.subjectMilitary policyen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.titleInternational and domestic drivers of military shifts in Alaskaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.degreemaen_US
dc.identifier.departmentArctic and Northern Studies Programen_US
dc.contributor.chairBoylan, Brandon M.
dc.contributor.committeeEhrlander, Mary F.
dc.contributor.committeeSpeight, Jeremy S.
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-05T16:51:20Z


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