Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGreene, Tammy Renee
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-26T21:19:39Z
dc.date.available2018-07-26T21:19:39Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/8874
dc.descriptionDissertation (Ph.D.) University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2006
dc.description.abstractSeven dietary indicators on 364 dentitions of working class Predynastic Egyptians from Hierakonpolis and Naqada are examined in this dissertation. The majority of the samples from both sites date to the Naqada 11 period (3500-3200 BC), during which these were the two main urban centers for Upper Egypt. Both sites are located on the west bank of the Nile approximately 130 km from one-another. The samples consist of adults and juveniles ranging from 6 years to over 50 years of age. The dietary indicators, which include caries, calculus, abscess, periodontal disease, macrowear, microwear, and hypoplastic enamel defects are used to look for statistically significant differences between working class inhabitants of the two sites as well as between the sex and age groups within each site. The analysis is used to address four main research questions. (1) What combination of the above indicators is the best for establishing an overall picture of diet and dental health? Results illustrate the importance of using a wide array of indictors. (2) Which of the available flora and fauna were being eaten? While each specific food could no be identified individually, cultivated items, such as wheat, barley or millet were being eaten in the form of bread, that raw vegetables were consumed by all individuals at Hierakonpolis but mostly women and children at Naqada, and that at least some meat and/or fish was consumed at both sites. (3) Were food types found as burial offerings were being eaten? Consumption of at least two burial offerings, bread and yellow nutsedge (Hierakonpolis only), are supported by the data. (4) Were the working class inhabitants of Hierakonpolis and Naqada consuming the same diet? Differences and similarities in the diet and dental health between inhabitants of the two sites are examined. While the major portions of the diet appear to be similar, this study found both dietary and behavioral differences between the working class members of these sites.
dc.subjectPhysical anthropology
dc.subjectForensic anthropology
dc.titleDiet And Dental Health In Predynastic Egypt: A Comparison Of Hierakonpolis And Naqada
dc.typeDissertation
dc.type.degreephd
dc.identifier.departmentDepartment of Anthropology
dc.contributor.chairIrish, Joel D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-05T16:23:40Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Greene_T_2006.pdf
Size:
7.036Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record