Sub-communities within this community

Recent Submissions

  • EarthScope publications database

    Sims, Nealey; Tasa, Keir; Larsen, Jessica; Tape, Carl (2020-08-04)
    We compile a database of EarthScope science publications though May 11, 2020. The database is preserved as a Google Scholar profile available at https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=ZKI-0gUAAAAJ&hl=en&authuser=3
  • Data Submission Package for Manuscript 'Model-predicting Matschie's Tree Kangaroo in Papua New Guinea'

    Falk Huettmann et al. (30-Jul-20)
    These are the GIS data used for modeling Matschie's Tree Kangaroo (Huon Tree Kangaroo) in Papua New Guinea PNG; for details please see metadata. THe manuscript is currently in revision phase.
  • Restructuring Alaska: An Alaska Oil, Gas and Industry Economic Treatise

    Reynolds, Douglas (None, 2020-07-31)
    This paper in the form of a treatise is about how to improve Alaska’s overall socio-economic welfare. It explains economic issues in Alaska starting with the Trans-Alaska (oil) Pipeline System (TAPS) and how TAPS interacts with Alaska’s oil industry and induces risk averse reactions by the state. It also explains how an alternative oil pipeline can replace TAPS in order to reduce Alaska’s expensive oil tax credits. The treatise also explains some of the issues surrounding how the oil tax credits work or don’t work including such interactions as how oil exploration is carried out, why shale-oil will not easily be developed in Alaska and how the credits subsidize Anchorage’s area energy costs to the detriment of the state as a whole. Ideas for economic development of the state are given including building natural gas infrastructure and how to set up electric utilities to maximize their value to the state. An alternative for Anchorage energy needs is a simple natural gas pipeline to Fairbanks with rail connection to Anchorage and eventually the use of TAPS for natural gas. An incentivized management system for monopoly electric power utilities is explained which can provide better cheaper electric power and an incentivized management system for a state owned oil company is explained which can help Alaska negotiate with OPEC to Alaska’s advantage. Aspects of the university and education funding are explained.
  • Metadata of six NCEAS data sets in Elith et al. 2020

    Elith, J.; Graham, C.H.; Valavi, R.; Abegg, M.; Bruce, C.; Ford, A.; Guisan, A.; Hijmans, R.J.; Huettmann, F.; Lohmann, L.G.; et al. (7/29/2020)
    The publication by Elith et al. 2020 publishes data from Elith et al. 2006 and consists of six data set; metadata descriptions provided here. Data are found in OSF and as an R package; details provided in Elith et al. 2020 and/or with authors.
  • Alaska Earthquakes Poster

    Gardine, Lea; West, Michael; Grassi, Beth (2020-06)
    Alaska is one of the most seismically active places in the world. This poster connects the geographic distribution of earthquakes from the Alaska Earthquake Center catalog with the core concepts that drive Alaska seismicity. Rupture patches, how plate tectonics forms faults throughout Alaska, and how the angle of the sinking Pacific Plate affects earthquake distribution and creates volcanoes are some of the key concepts represented.
  • Pod Cast US Shale-Oil Production Peak

    Reynolds, Douglas (2020-07-08)
    This paper, in the form of a Pod Cast, estimates a U.S. shale-oil production trend forecast and explores potential consequences of that trend on U.S. and World macroeconomic conditions and growth prospects. It explains the economics of the Hubbert curve including a literature review both pro and con. It explains the relationship of shale-oil and shale-gas. It falsifies various U.S. shale-oil trend hypotheses using logic and econometrics. It then presents oil price expectations based on an analyses of entropy-economic relationships, physical energy characteristics, new-institutional economic theories of OPEC, and OPEC+ game-theoretic plays. Covid-19, OPEC+ and macro-economic principles are analyzed for their potential market changing effects using Schwartzian futurology methodology. A comparison of the current global civilization to past civilizations is also carried out.
  • When Uŋalaqłiq danced: stories of strength, suppression & hope

    Qassataq, Ayyu; Stern, Charlene B.; Black, Jessica C.; John-Shields, Agatha (2020-05)
    In the late 1800’s, Uŋalaqłiq (Unalakleet), a predominantly Iñupiaq community along the Norton Sound in Western Alaska, was missionized by the Evangelical Covenant Church. Missionaries were integral in establishing a localized education system under the direction of General Agent of Education, Sheldon Jackson, in the early 1900’s. By 1915, the community was no longer engaging in ancestral practices such as deliberating, teaching and hosting ceremonies within the qargi. Nor were they uplifting shared history and relationships between villages or expressing gratitude for the bounty of the lands through traditional songs, dances, or celebrations such as the Kivgiq Messenger Feast. This research outlines events that occurred in Uŋalaqłiq around the turn of the 20th century and analyzes how those events influenced the formation of the education system and its ongoing impacts to Native peoples and communities today. The intent of this research is to help grow a shared understanding of how this history continues to shape our lived experience as modern day Native peoples and to lay a foundation to promote healing and strength through the potential revival of ancestral traditions that have kept us healthy and strong for thousands of years.
  • Reynolds Curriculum Vita 2020

    Reynolds, Douglas (none, 2020-07-07)
  • PEDESTRIAN TRAVEL-TIME MAPS FOR WHITTIER, ALASKA: An anisotropic model to support tsunami evacuation planning

    Gardine, Lea; Nicolsky, Dmitry (2019-05)
    Tsunami-induced pedestrian evacuation for the community of Whittier is evaluated using an anisotropic modeling approach developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is based on path-distance algorithms and accounts for variations in land cover and directionality in the slope of terrain. We model evacuation of pedestrians to exit points from the tsunami hazard zone boundary. The pedestrian travel is restricted to the roads only. Results presented here are intended to provide guidance to local emergency management agencies for tsunami inundation assessment, evacuation planning, and public education to mitigate future tsunami hazards.
  • PEDESTRIAN TRAVEL-TIME MAPS FOR SITKA, ALASKA: An anisotropic model to support tsunami evacuation planning

    Macpherson, Amy; Gardine, Lea; Nicolsky, Dmitry (2020-06)
    Tsunami-induced pedestrian evacuation for Sitka is evaluated using an anisotropic modeling approach developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is based on path-distance algorithms and accounts for variations in land cover and directionality in the slope of terrain. We model evacuation of pedestrians to exit points from the tsunami hazard zone. The pedestrian travel is restricted to the roads only. Results presented here are intended to provide guidance to local emergency management agencies for tsunami inundation assessment, evacuation planning, and public education to mitigate future tsunami hazards.
  • PEDESTRIAN TRAVEL-TIME MAPS FOR PERRYVILLE, ALASKA: An anisotropic model to support tsunami evacuation planning

    Gardine, Lea; Nicolsky, Dmitry (2019-08)
    Tsunami-induced pedestrian evacuation for the community of Perryville is evaluated using an anisotropic modeling approach developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is based on path-distance algorithms and accounts for variations in land cover and directionality in the slope of terrain. We model evacuation of pedestrians to exit points located at the tsunami hazard zone boundary. Pedestrian travel-time maps are computed for two cases: i) travel to an existing evacuating shelter and ii) travel to either the evacuation or an alternative shelter. Results presented here are intended to provide guidance to local emergency management agencies for tsunami inundation assessment, evacuation planning, and public education to mitigate future tsunami hazards.
  • PEDESTRIAN TRAVEL-TIME MAPS FOR CORDOVA, ALASKA: An anisotropic model to support tsunami evacuation planning

    Macpherson, Amy; Gardine, Lea; Nicolsky, Dmitry (2020-06)
    Tsunami-induced pedestrian evacuation for Cordova is evaluated using an anisotropic modeling approach developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is based on path-distance algorithms and accounts for variations in land cover and directionality in the slope of terrain. We model evacuation of pedestrians to exit points from the tsunami hazard zone. The pedestrian travel is restricted to the roads only. Results presented here are intended to provide guidance to local emergency management agencies for tsunami inundation assessment, evacuation planning, and public education to mitigate future tsunami hazards.
  • Energy Civilization: Civilization's Ultimate Energy Forecast

    Reynolds, Douglas (None, 2020-06-16)
    This treatise is an addendum to Reynolds’ (2011). It looks at the U.S. shale-oil production trend, and specifically at the Hubbert peak of that trend. Simmons (2005), Deffeyes (2001), Hubbert, (1962), Norgaard (1990) and Campbell (1997), among others show how there can be a peak in oil production. Reynolds (2002, 2009) explains the economic and cost theory for how and why the Hubbert Curve works, including how the information and depletion effects create such a curve. Nevertheless, Maugeri (2007), Adelman and Lynch (1997), and Lynch (2002) suggest that one should never curve fit an oil production trend, contrary to most economic disciplines where curve fitting using econometrics is the norm. Although, as of early 2020 the COVID-19 recession is greatly affecting petroleum markets. Nevertheless, the Hubbert supply trend is relevant. Also, Reynolds and Umekwe (2019) show that shale-gas and shale-oil can be compliments or substitutes in production. Based on that relationship, once the U.S. shale-oil peak occurs, it may be the world’s ultimate Hubbert peak with much smaller and lower Hubbert cycles thereafter. Worldwide petroleum institutions and strategies will also change. This treatise estimates a U.S. shale-oil Hubbert peak, scrutinizes the Hubbert related theories and explores oil price forecasts, taking into account medium run COVID-19 oil demand effects.
  • Effects of Reading Text While Driving: A Driving Simulator Study

    Prevedouros, Panos; Miah, M. Mintu; Nathanail, Eftihia (2020-02)
    Although 47 US states make the use of a mobile phone while driving illegal, many people use their phone for texting and other tasks while driving. This research project summarized the large literature on distracted driving and compared major outcomes with those of our study. We focused on distraction due to reading text because this activity is most common. For this research project, we collected simulator observations of 203 professional taxi drivers (175 male, and 28 female) working at the same Honolulu taxi company, using the mid-range driving simulator VS500M by Virage. After a familiarization period, drivers were asked to read realistic text content relating to passenger pick up displayed on a 7-inch tablet affixed to the dashboard. The experimental scenario was simulated on a two-lane rural highway having a speed limit of 60 mph and medium traffic. Drivers needed to follow the lead vehicle under regular and text-reading conditions. The large sample size of this study provided a strong statistical base for driving distraction investigation on a driving simulator. The comparison between regular and text-reading conditions revealed that the drivers significantly increased their headway (20.7%), lane deviations (354%), total time of driving blind (352%), maximum duration of driving blind (87.6% per glance), driving blind incidents (170%), driving blind distance (337%) and significantly decreased lane change frequency (35.1%). There was no significant effect on braking aggressiveness while reading text. The outcomes indicate that driving performance degrades significantly by reading text while driving. Additional analysis revealed that important predictors for maximum driving blind time changes are sociodemographic characteristics, such as age and race, and past behavior attributes.
  • Seismicity and Stresses in the Kantishna Seismic Cluster, Central Alaska

    Burris, Lea A. (2007-12)
    The Kantishna Cluster is an enigmatic and energetic cluster of earthquakes located in central Alaska, just to the northwest of Mt. McKinley/Denali and adjacent to the Denali Fault. The Kantishna Cluster has no visible fault traces, and is often speculated to have a connection to the Denali Fault. The Kantishna Cluster is located at a hub of tectonic activity including Bering Block rotation to the west, bookshelf faulting to the northeast, and rotation of southern Alaska due to Pacific plate convergence to the south. The intention of this study was to broaden the knowledge base about the Kantishna Cluster and use the Mw 7.9 Denali Fault earthquake to find a relationship between the cluster and the Denali Fault Zone. Rate calculations in conjunction with z- and b-value changes show that the Denali Fault earthquake had little influence on the seismicity of the Kantishna Cluster, with the exception being the southern most portion closest to the Denali Fault. The highly variable background rate of seismicity in the Kantishna Cluster makes seeing changes in the seismicity difficult. Stress tensor inversions suggest a change in the stresses in the Kantishna Cluster; however, triangle diagram comparisons show that the pattern of earthquake mechanism types did not change. Coulomb stress change calculations predict small changes that were not observed in the data. Double difference hypocentral relocations show that the cloud of earthquakes collapses down to several distinct features. Seismicity trends resolved from hypocentral relocations made it possible to infer fault planes or planar structures in the region. The newly uncovered structures are utilized in the formation of a model involving two wedges to describe the seismicity in the Kantishna Cluster. The two wedges are being “squeezed” in opposite directions accommodating for compression across the cluster due to Pacific plate convergence.
  • Data (Appendix) for Book Chapter 43: Citizen Science Experience in Lumbini/Nepali for Sarus Cranes and Lesser Adjudants (Storks) with Regmi and Huettmann 2020 Hindu Kush Himalaya: Watersheds Downhill, Springer

    Karmacharya, D.K.; Duwal, R.; Yadav, S.K. (4/2/2020)
    This dataset consist of an appendix of citizen science data for the Sarus Crane and Adjudant storks in Lumbini and Jagdishpur Reservoir, Nepal. It's a plain MS Excel sheet.
  • Data (Appendix) for Book Chapter 33: Persistent Langur (Semnopithecus) decline in Nepal with Regmi and Huettmann 2020 Hindu Kush Himalaya: Watersheds Downhill, Springer

    Ale, Purna Bahadur; Regmi, Ganga Ram; Huettmann, Falk (4/2/2020)
    This dataset consists of an appendix of a GIS map of langur sp information in Nepal. The datasets are locations, presences and absences from a value-added GBIF.org query, transect data by the authors and literature data Details are specified in the book chapter by Ale et al in Regmi and Huettmann 2020. This is the first and best compiled data for this species in Nepal and shows national declines with large conservation management implications.
  • Data (Appendix) for Book Chapter 25: Museum Data holdings and Libraries in Nepal and Hindu Kush Himalaya region with Regmi and Huettmann 2020 Hindu Kush Himalaya: Watersheds Downhill, Springer

    Huettmann, Falk (4/2/2020)
    This compiled dataset consists of a value-added analysed GBIF data set in the wider Hindu Kush-Himalaya (HKH) region. The original data source is from individual national contributors found in GBIF. Data are used here for research purposes for the wider HKH region watersheds and to show institutional spread and distribution. Some major outside museums internationally are mentioned too. The dataset consists of MS Excel sheets Methods and details are specified in the book chapter by Huettmann in Regmi and Huettmann 2020. This is the first and best compiled data for the study area and is to set a start of such views and investigations towards a better and more fair access to data, as part of a better and more democratic decision-making process.
  • Data (Appendix) for Book Chapter 22: Rapid Assessment of Urban Birds and GIS models of Kathmandu and Pokhara, Nepal with Regmi and Huettmann 2020 Hindu Kush Himalaya: Watersheds Downhill, Springer

    Hansen, Lindsay; Huettmann, Falk (4/2/2020)
    This compiled dataset consists of a field data from rapid assessment of common birds found in urban areas of Kathmandu and Pokhara, Nepal, Hindu Kush-Himalaya (HKH) region.The dataset consists of 31 bird and animal species from a detection survey of 2 transects and photos in MS Excel sheets. It is overlaid with Open Street GIS map predictors for the study areas, and model predicted with GIS. We used the following 6 layers:waterways, natural places, shop polygons, land use, roads and highways and computed proximities for each in GIS. Methods and details are specified in the book chapter by Huettmann in Regmi and Huettmann 2020. This is the first and best compiled field and GIS data for the study area and is to set a start of such views and investigations towards a better and more fair access to data, as part of a better and more democratic decision-making process. Here an example is presented using avian species and GIS habitat layers.

View more