• Alaska's Inclusion in the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956, The Work of the Bureau of Public Roads and The Transition to Statehood

      Naske, Claus M. (1987-07)
      This is the continuation of a research project which I undertook several years ago for DOT&PF. I delivered the final report in June, 1983, entitled Alaska Road Commission Historical Narrative. Subsequently, the Alaska Historical Commission provided an editing and a pre-publication grant. The University Press of America, Inc. of Lanham, Maryland accepted the revised manuscript for publication and it was published in November 1986 entitled Paving Alaska's Trails: The Work of the Alaska Road Commission. The present report continues the narrative from 1956 to 1959.
    • Alaska's Multibooms

      Pearson, Roger W.; Rhoades, Edwin M.; Lewis, Carol E. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1990-01)
      An assessment of Growth of Infrastructure Booms have been a common element in the development of frontier areas in the 19th and 20th centuries. Most commonly, the booms have been associated with resource development such as the mineral booms of the western United States. Booms usually involve some type of dramatic short- term change which has wide-ranging implications (Gilmore, 1976). Since the arrival of the Russians in Alaska, six major booms have occurred: furs, whales, salmon, minerals, military, and petroleum. Each of these booms has, to some degree, created changes in the landscape of Alaska, in particular, the infrastructural base, which in turn has facilitated subsequent development, either another major boom, or a smaller development. For example, agricultural development has been enhanced by mineral, military, and petroleum booms in Alaska. The cumulative impact on infrastructure of more than one boom, or multibooms, as it is referred to here, is the focus of this paper. One problem encountered in studying booms is that there is no general agreement on what constitutes a boom. Detailed studies of booms in communities such as Dixon’s (1978) analysis of Fairbanks and Gilmore’s multi-community work in the Great Plains—Rocky •mountain regions, contained no specific definition of the term “boom”. Yet it was clear in each study that something dramatic had occurred. More general historical studies of the Western mineral bonanzas (Greever, 1963) or the Klondike gold rush (Berton, 1958) likewise suggest a number of factors such as population rise, influx of money, resource extraction, and infrastructure expansion. But in each case, there is no specific factor or define rate of something that specifically qualifies a time period as a boom. In this study, we are concerned with dramatic change of events which have had a major impact on the geographic landscape of an area, As a framework for the initial study, we review those events which have been given attention as boom-type activities in the historical literature of Alaska (Rogers, 1962; Naske and Slotnick, 1987).
    • Alaska's Water: A Critical Resource

      Bredthauer, Stephen R. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1984-11)
    • Alaska-Canada Rail Link Economic Benefits

      Watts, Teresa; Peter Wallis Consulting Limited; Metz, Paul A. (2019-07)
      Construction of the 1,740 km Alaska-Canada Rail Link (ACRL) between Fort Nelson, BC and Delta Junction, Alaska to join the North American rail system to the Alaska Railroad will result in tremendous economic benefits for Canada and the US. The ACRL will provide valuable additional east-west rail capacity and tidewater access to the Pacific, hugely benefitting not only the Yukon and Eastern Alaska regions, into which it will introduce rail transport for the first time, but throughout both countries. The economic benefits of ACRL construction are consistent with Canadian government’s desire to promote Northern development and comparable in significance to those of Canadian Pacific Railway in the 1880’s and the St. Lawrence Seaway in the 1950’s. Construction of the ACRL alone will bring unprecedented economic stimulus to the region in terms of job creation, wages and income tax revenue over multiple years. Table 7-1 below summarizes the benefits from ACRL construction for the Yukon, BC and Canada as a whole. However, these estimates are conservative as they exclude benefits associated with pre-construction activities, railway operation post-construction, sales taxes and corporate taxes as well as all such benefits that will accrue to Alaska and the US.
    • Alaskan water resources: Selected abstracts, 1974

      Hartman, Charles; Finch, Sheila (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1977-02)
      As one of the 51 Water Resources Research Institutes administered under the Water Resources Research Act of 1964, IWR receives a semimonthly journal entitled Selected Water Resources Abstracts. The bulletin, published by the Water Resources Scientific Information Center (WRSIC) of the Office of Water Research and Technology, includes abstracts of documents covering the water-related aspects of the life, physical, and social sciences as well as related engineering and legal aspects of the characteristics, conservation, control, use, or management of water. Each abstract in the bulletin is classified into 10 fields and 60 groups of water research categories (see page iii). In addition, the journal contains a subject, author, and organizational index. In an attempt to keep interested parties abreast of the research being done in water resources in Alaska, the Institute of Water Resources is planning to publish yearly all abstracts listed under the subject index "Alaska." This report covers all citations for 1974.
    • Analysis of Alaska's water use act and its interaction with federal reserved water rights

      Curran, Harold J.; Dwight, Linda Perry (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1979-02)
      Since the passage of Alaska's Water Use Act in 1966, the amount of water required by Alaska's growing population and resource development has increased very rapidly. The need to review the adequacy of existing water use laws and their administration has been expressed both by those trying to comply with regulations and by those attempting to enforce standards and permit requirements. This report summarizes the historical development of the doctrine of prior appropriation in Alaska. The statutory authority, regulations, and administration of Alaska's Water Use Act by the Alaska Department of Natural Resources are presented. Overlapping state agency authorities are discussed, and existing and proposed regulations are analyzed. The application of federal reserved water rights to Alaska and the status of quantification of these rights is explained. The report presents options for the State of Alaska to manage water use on federal lands, and for preserving minimum stream flows for maintenance of fish and wildlife habitats.
    • An Analysis of the Demands for Water from the Private Sector in a Sub-Arctic Urban Area

      Haring, Robert C. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources, 1972-04)
      Manufacturing and domestic uses of water are very important to local communities throughout Alaska, although manufacturing typically represents relatively high levels of consumption in terms of population use equivalents. This study is concerned principally with the present water use practices and associated problems in the private sector of the North Star Borough, Alaska.
    • Annotated Keys to the Genera of the Tribe Diamesini (Diptera: Chironomidae), Descriptions of the Female and Immatures of Potthastia iberica Tosio, and Keys to the Known Species of Potthastia

      Doughman, Jan S. (University of Alaska, Institute of Water Resources and Engineering Experiment Station, 1985-08)
      A review of available information on the tribe Diamesini led to the construction of generic keys to most life stages. Serra-Tosio (1971b) first described Potthastia iberica from an adult male from the Spanish Pyrenees. Evaluation of specimens collected in the Nearctic, from Idaho (in 1967) and Georgia (in 1981 and 1983), indicate that this species is extant in eastern and western highland streams that appear to be typical trout streams. This new group of specimens contained a mature male and female pupa and immatures, and associations made it possible to describe the female and the immatures for the first time. Adult specimens conform very closely to the holotype. The known species of Potthastia are keyed.
    • Annual and Perennial Herb Evaluations 2004

      Damron, Virginia; Rondine, Barbara; Wilson, George; Fay, Barbara; Cook, Olga; Kerndt, Gretchen; Klammer, Nancy; Askelin, Marilyn; Munsell, Marsha; King, J. Dee; et al. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2005-07)
    • Annual and Perennial Herb Evaluations 2005

      King, J. Dee; Robertson, Heather; Waite, Maggie; Fay, Barbara; Hansen, Celese; Nutter, Moira; Damron, Virginia; Rondine, Barbara; Wilson, George; Haggland, Phyllis; et al. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2006-03)
    • Annual Flower & Perennial Landscape Plant Evaluations 1995

      Wagner, Patricia J.; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; MacDonald, Theresa; Van Wyne, Eileen (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1996-02)
      In 1989, a systematic evaluation o f woody and herbaceous perennial landscape plants was begun at the University o f Alaska Fairbanks Georgeson Botanical Garden (64 51'N , 147°52'W). These evaluations w ere expanded to include annual flowers in 1992 and ferns in 1993. The purpose o f this research is to identify hardy perennials capable o f surviving in subarctic environments; to evaluate the ornamental potential o f perennials and annuals; and to fulfill a growing demand for information on landscape plant materials by homeowners, commercial growers, and landscapes.
    • Annual Flower and Perennial Landscape Plant Evaluations 1993

      Wagner, Patricia J.; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; Berry, Sally; Barbour, Edie (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1994-05)
      In 1989, a systematic evaluation of woody and herbaceous perennial landscape plants was begun at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Georgeson Botanical Garden (64051’N, 147°52’W). These evaluations were expanded to include annual flowers in 1992 and ferns in 1993. The purpose of this research is to identify hardy perennials capable of surviving in subarctic environments; to evaluate the ornamental potential of perennials and annuals; and to fulfill a growing demand for information on landscape plant materials by homeowners, commercial growers, and landscapers.
    • Annual Flower and Perennial Landscape Plant Evaluations 1994

      Wagner, Patricia J.; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; Berry, Sally; Barbour, Edie (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1995-02)
      In 1989, a systematic evaluation of woody and herbaceous perennial landscape plants was begun at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Georgeson Botanical Garden (64°51’N, 147°52’W). These evaluations were expanded to include annual flowers in 1992 and ferns in 1993. The purpose of this research is to identify hardy perennials capable of surviving in subarctic environments; to evaluate the ornamental potential of perennials and annuals; and to fulfill a growing demand for information on landscape plant materials by homeowners, commercial growers, and landscapers.
    • Annual Flower and Perennial Landscape Plant Evaluations 1996

      Wagner, Patricia J.; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E. M.; MacDonald, Theresa; Van Wyhe, Eileen (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 1997-03)
    • Annual Flower Evaluations 2003

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E. M.; Hanscom, Jan; Gardiner, Alfreda; Hill, Victoria; Van Wyhe, Eileen (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2003-12)
    • Annual Flowering Plant Evaluations 2002

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E. M.; Hanscom, Jan; Van Wyhe, Eileen; Hill, Victoria (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 2002-12)
    • Annual Flowering Plant Evaluations 2004

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Gardiner, Etta; Matheke, Grant E. M.; Hanscom, Jan; Van Wyhe, Eileen; Hill, Victoria (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2005-02)
    • Annual Flowering Plant Evaluations 2005

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Gardiner, Etta; Matheke, Grant EM; Hanscom, Jan; Van Wyhe, Eileen; Hill, Victoria (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2006-02)