• A Communication Perspective Of Alcoholism Recovery: Narratives Of Success

      Arlen, Kathryn Grace; Brown, Jin (2007)
      Understanding alcoholism and how it wreaks havoc upon the human condition has been and continues to be a prime concern for social scientists, psychologists, physicians, therapists, the legal system, a host of other concerned professionals, and society in general, particularly those who suffer from this "dis-ease" (Denzin, 1987a). Much past research has focused upon physiological concerns, suggesting disease, genetic, or even allergic connections. While such research certainly carries significant import and credibility, this study focuses on the social construction of the alcoholic identity and eventual evolution into a recovering identity. The methodology of narrative inquiry with conversational interviewing as method provides insight into six individuals' shifting perceptions of self and relationships from their alcoholic experiences to increasingly more viable social interactions and eventual positive self identity construction. Emergent themes focus on interactive social context, divided feelings toward alcohol, communication of individual responsibility, and realignment of human values.
    • A Comparative Analysis Of Mhc Genetic Diversity At The Class Ii Loci In Some Arctic Mammalian Species

      Wei, Zhengyu; Happ, George (2002)
      The genetic diversity at the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II loci in some arctic mammalian species, musk ox, moose, caribou, and bears, have been characterized. The general objective of this study was to broaden the knowledge of the MHC polymorphism, selection, evolution and function in natural populations of arctic mammals. Allelic variation was assessed by analysis of MHC class II DR and DQ loci at exon 2 region. Sequences were amplified via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by either DNA sequencing after cloning of the PCR products or single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and sequencing. Monomorphism was observed at DRA, DRB, and DQA loci in both musk ox and moose, but relatively high polymorphism was observed at DQB locus. For the first time, four DQB alleles and one DQA allele were found identical in these two distantly related species which split approximately 23 million years ago, indicating stringent trans-species polymorphism. Both DRB and DQB seem to be functional by analyzing their cDNA expression. An intermediate level of MHC polymorphism at DRB locus was found in caribou and reindeer. Phylogenetic analysis of cervid DRB alleles indicated that all reindeer and caribou DRB alleles were from a monophyletic lineage, implying an ancient bottleneck in R. tarandus. High polymorphism at the DRB locus in polar bear was also observed. Four DRB alleles were found to be shared by polar bear and dog. The trans-species polymorphism of the shared alleles may have been persistent for 10 to 15 million years. Nine DQB alleles rather than two DRB alleles were also found in a pure domestic dog lineage of Doberman pinschers. These data imply that selection pressure may vary among MHC loci. In summary, the general level of MHC polymorphism at the class II loci is lower in herbivores (musk ox, moose, and caribou) than carnivores (polar bear). Biased selection may be applied on DQB locus. Stringent trans-species polymorphism between two distantly related species may be the result of persistent selection by shared parasites in the same environment.
    • A comparative study of contrasting structural styles in the range-front region of the northeastern Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, northeastern Brooks Range, Alaska

      Hanks, Catherine Leigh; Stone, David B.; Crowder, R. Keith; Keskinen, Mary J.; Watts, Keith W.; Ave Lallemant, Hans G.; Mull, C. G. (1991)
      The range front of the northeastern Brooks Range in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) is defined by anticlinoria cored by a 'basement' complex of weakly metamorphosed sedimentary, volcanic and intrusive rocks. These anticlinoria are interpreted to reflect horses in a northward-propagating regional duplex between a floor thrust at depth in the 'basement' complex and a roof thrust near the base of the cover sequence. Lateral variations in the geometry of these range-front anticlinoria reflect changes in lithology and deformational style of both the 'basement' and its cover. Two distinct structural geometries are displayed along the range front of northeastern ANWR. To the east, the large range-front anticlinorium is interpreted to reflect multiple horses of Cenozoic age within the stratified, slightly metamorphosed sedimentary and volcanic rocks of the pre-Mississippian 'basement'. During Cenozoic thrusting, these mechanically heterogeneous rocks deformed primarily via thrusting and related folding with minor penetrative strain. The Mississippian and younger cover sequence shortened via both thrust duplication and detachment folding above a detachment in the Mississippian Kayak Shale. In contrast, to the west the pre-Mississippian rocks consist primarily of the mechanically homogeneous Devonian Okpilak batholith. The batholith was transported northward during Cenozoic thrusting and now forms a major topographic and structural high near the range front. The batholith probably shortened during thrusting as a homogeneous mass via penetrative strain. Because the Kayak Shale is thin to absent in the vicinity of the batholith, Mississippian and younger rocks remained attached to the batholith and shortened via penetrative strain and minor imbrication. These two range-front areas form the central portion of two regional transects through northeastern ANWR. General area-balanced models for both transects suggest that the amount of total shortening is governed by the structural topography and the geometry of the basal detachment surface. While the structural topography of northeastern ANWR is reasonably well-constrained, the geometry of the basal detachment is not. Given a range in reasonable basal detachment geometries, shortening in both transects ranges from 16% to 61%. Detailed balanced cross sections based on subsurface and surface geologic data yield 46-48% shortening for both transects.
    • A Comparison Of The Effects Of Analysis Techniques And Computer Systems In Remote Sensing Technology And A Reference Data Collection Technique

      Spencer, Joellen Page (1981)
      A technique for collecting and recording reference data which considers the spectral and spatial characteristics of Landsat data, the computer system being used, and the gradient nature of wildland vegetation was developed and described. Different analysis techniques for four critical factors affecting the accuracy of computer-aided analysis products were evaluated. Comparisons were made on the basis of accuracy evaluations of two methods of data/analyst interface, three methods of deriving training statistics, three methods of spectral class descriptions, and two levels of map category detail. The primary data set used was digital Landsat multispectral data for a study area around Fairbanks, Alaska. Reference data were developed from field work and photo-interpretation. The training methods compared were supervised, unsupervised, and modified clustering. The three spectral class description methods were: (1) labels derived from the training data; (2) the color display screen; and (3) from ground plot data. Community level cover types were compared with generalized map categories. The effect of post-classification stratification was evaluated. The reference data technique provides geographically located stands and cover types identifications with a flexible coding system that can be aggregated to correspond to the spectral data categories. No difference in classification accuracy was found for an experienced analyst using a printout oriented system such as EDITOR or a screen oriented system such as IDIMS. The modified cluster method of developing training statistics was more effective and efficient than supervised or unsupervised training methods. The use of ground plot data and subsequent stratification improved the descriptions of spectral classes. Generalized mapping categories were more accurate than detailed mapping categories. Knowledge of the ecologic, floristic, and spectral characteristics of the cover types in the study area is necessary to develop spectral class descriptions and stratification criteria.
    • A Computer Simulation Of Auroral Arc Formation

      Wagner, John Scott (1981)
      Recent satellite measurements have revealed two intriguing features associated with the formation of auroral arcs. The first is that an auroral arc is produced by a sheet of electrons accelerated along a geomagnetic field-aligned potential drop, and the second is that these electrons carry a field-aligned, upward directed electric current. In order to explain these measurements, a self-consistent, time dependent, computer simulation of auroral arc formation has been developed. The simulation demonstrates for the first time that a stable V-shaped potential structure, called an auroral double layer, develops spontaneously as a result of an ion shielded electron current sheet interacting with a conducting ionosphere. The double layer accelerates current-carrying electrons into the upper atmosphere at auroral energies. The double layer potential depends critically on the drift speed of the current-carrying electrons and on the temperature of the ambient shielding ions. Localized double layers occur near the ionosphere when the geomagnetic field is assumed to be uniform, but when a converging magnetic field is introduced, the double layer becomes extended due to the presence of an additional population of electrons trapped between the magnetic mirror and the double layer potential. The simulated auroral current sheet is subject to auroral curl and fold type deformations due to unstable Kelvin-Helmholtz waves. The previous incompletely understood auroral fold producing mechanism is described.
    • A Concept To Assess The Performance Of A Permafrost Model Run Fully Coupled With A Climate Model

      Paimazumder, Debasish (2009)
      Soil-temperatures simulated by the fully coupled Community Climate System Model LCM version 3.0 (CCSM3) are evaluated using three gridded Russian soil-temperature climatologies (1951-1980, 1961-1990, and 1971-2000) to assess the performance of permafrost and/or soil simulations. CCSM3 captures the annual phase of the soil-temperature cycle well, but not the amplitude. It provides slightly too high (low) soil-temperatures in winter (summer) with a better performance in summer than winter. In winter, soil-temperature biases reach up to 6 K. Simulated near-surface air temperatures agree well with the near-surface air temperatures from reanalysis data. Discrepancies in CCSM3-simulated near-surface air temperatures significantly correlate with discrepancies in CCSM3-simulated soil-temperatures, i.e. contribute to discrepancy in soil-temperature simulation. Evaluation of cloud-fraction by means of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology project data reveals that errors in simulated cloud fraction explain some of the soil-temperature discrepancies in summer. Evaluation by means of the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre data identifies inaccurately-simulated precipitation as a contributor to underestimating summer soil-temperatures. Comparison to snow-depth observations shows that overestimating snow-depth leads to winter soil-temperature overestimation. Sensitivity studies reveal that uncertainty in mineral-soil composition notably contributes to discrepancies between CCSM3-simulated and observed soil-temperature climatology while differences between the assumed vegetation in CCSM3 and the actual vegetation in nature marginally contribute to the discrepancies in soil-temperature. Out of the 6 K bias in CCSM3 soil-temperature simulation, about 2.5 K of the bias may result from the incorrect simulation of the observed forcing and about 2 K of the bias may be explained by uncertainties due network density in winter. This means that about 1.5 K winter-bias may result from measurement errors and/or model deficiencies. Overall, the performance of a permafrost/soil model fully coupled with a climate model depends partly on the permafrost/soil model itself, the accuracy of the forcing data and design of observational network.
    • A Description Of Baldrige In Education Leadership Concepts Within The Alaska Quality Schools Model Of Education

      Crumley, Robert L.; Madsen, Eric; Monahan, John; Morotti, Allan; Allen, Jim; Covey, Jerry (2008)
      This dissertation reviews the implementation of the Quality Schools Model (QSM) of educational reform in three rural Alaska school districts. This research examines the fit between the theoretical model of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA) program and actual practice in the context of rural Alaskan school districts implementing the QSM. Specifically, I sought to determine the perceived levels of importance and practice of leadership practices to form conclusions about the role of leadership. I examined the systematic creation of conditions within the studied districts to foster the transformation from traditional hierarchical leadership to distributed leadership with ownership throughout the system. The results of this mixed-methods study come in part from an analysis of quantitative survey data from a sampling of the three districts' certified and classified staff. Using a concurrent nested design, I triangulated these data with qualitative data gathered through semi-structured interviews of a criterion-based sample of staff and community members within the districts. I conducted this research in collaboration with three cohort members. The following are summary statements of the principal quantitative findings for the common research question: (1) The QSM survey data confirmed the theory that as an independent construct, Leadership drives the remaining Baldrige constructs within the QSM. Derived from the QSM survey, it is therefore a valid Leadership Model for rural Alaskan educators. (2) Through principal component analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and structural equation modeling, we found that within the QSM school districts studied, leadership had significant direct causal effect upon two Baldrige constructs (Staff Focus and Knowledge Management) and an indirect causal effect upon the remaining four constructs (Process Management; Strategic Planning; Student, Stakeholder, and Market Focus; and Results). The fit indices from structural equation modeling show the alternative QSM Leadership Model to be a statistically acceptable alternative to the Baldrige (MBNQA) model. This research illustrated that staff of the three districts in the study perceived the MBNQA leadership concepts within the QSM to be important. While these districts may not have fully implemented these concepts, this study indicates each district is well on its way toward putting them into practice.
    • A Description Of The Relationship Between Process Management And The Quality Schools Model In Three Rural Alaska School Districts

      Atwater, Stephen G.; Madsen, Eric; Monahan, John; Allen, Jim; Porter, David (2008)
      This study, conducted as part of a cohort of four, included three districts that follow the Quality Schools Model of educational reform. It used a mixed methods research paradigm to describe how one particular reform evaluation criterion, process management, is believed to be important and to be in practice as a part of the Quality Schools Model (QSM). Process management is the pertinent techniques and tools applied to a process to implement and improve process effectiveness. In this study, I sought to answer four research questions that are fully described in Chapter 3. Three of these questions explored stakeholders' perceptions about the importance of process management in contrast to their perceptions about the extent to which process management was actually in practice in the studied districts. The results of the analysis of the responses showed that there were few significant differences among the respondents. However, stakeholders' perception about the extent to which process management was actually in practice varied significantly with their job classification, but did not vary significantly with either their level of educational work experience or their years of experience with the QSM. Question four of this research was common to the cohort and explored the interrelationship of the seven Malcom Baldrige in Education Criteria in the three districts. The Malcom Baldrige in Education Criteria are a method to evaluate the quality of a school district. The cohort used structural equation modeling (SEM) to answer this question. The data supported a model that shows general agreement with the hypothesized model that is included with the Baldrige literature. While this research was specific to the QSM, others who are pursuing systemic educational reform should consider the implications. They are: holistic educational reform is dependent on well established processes; leadership does not have a direct influence on results; a school district's shared vision must be comprehensive to allow optimum learning conditions through the effective establishment of coproduction; and Total Quality Management practices should be included as a way to ensure staff does its best.
    • A Descriptive Analysis Of Yakutat Tlingit Musical Style.

      Morrison, Dorothy; Johnston, Thomas F. (1988)
      Ninety-nine songs from Yakutat, Alaska were analyzed in an effort to determine a musical style of the Gulf Coast Tlingit. Songs were grouped into seven categories from which general trends of style were deduced. Analysis, which was based on the transcriptions of David P. McAllester, included interval distribution, range, tone systems, weighted scales, melodic contour, tempo, duration and rest values, drumming patterns, formal structure, and song length. The transcriptions and data for drumming patterns, formal structure and song length were provided by McAllester in "Under Mount Saint Elias: The History and Culture of the Yakutat Tlingit," by Frederica de Laguna, 1972, Smithsonian Contributions to Anthropology, Volume 7, Washington, D.C: Smithsonian Institution Press. Stylistic differences in the areas of interval distribution, range, tone systems, weighted scales, melodic contour, and tempo were discovered between the two largest categories, the traditional Sib Potlatch songs and the songs of more recent composition called Haida Mouth songs. <p>
    • A Detailed Structural Analysis Across A Regional Unconformity, Forks Of The Canning River, Franklin Mountains, Northeastern Brooks Range, Alaska

      Ziegler, Jennifer Ann (1989)
      Structural analysis on the northern flank of the 'Franklin Mountains anticlinorium,' northeastern Brooks Range, Alaska, addressed the geometry and sequence of structures, and the deformational mechanics of the Franklinian and Ellesmerian sequences, which are separated by a sub-Mississippian unconformity. The anticlinorium is comprised of two horses of Franklinian sequence rocks in a Cenozoic north-vergent duplex thrust system. South-dipping pre-Mississippian slaty cleavage may have been a plane of preferred failure during ramp formation. Above the unconformity, the Kekiktuk Conglomerate remained attached to pre-Mississippian rocks, deforming with them beneath a roof thrust in the Mississippian Kayak Shale. Increased shear stress and overburden pressure beneath overthrust Franklinian sequence rocks may have led to local detachment near the unconformity surface. Above the Kayak Shale, progressive detachment folding and thrust faulting occurred in the Lisburne and Sadlerochit Groups as a result of emplacement of the two underlying horses. <p>
    • A fully two-dimensional flux-corrected transport algorithm for hyperbolic partial differential equations

      Huang, Sen-Wei; Gislason, Gary (1989)
      Numerical solutions of the hyperbolic partial differential equation, $\partial p\over\partial t$ + $\vec\nabla \cdot (p\vec u)$ = 0, will generally encounter the difficulties of large diffusion and oscillations near steep gradients or discontinuities. The method of Flux-Corrected Transport (FCT) developed by Boris and Book has conquered these difficulties for the one-dimensional case. Motivated by this one-dimensional FCT algorithm, a fully two-dimensional FCT algorithm is developed in this present work. This fully two-dimensional FCT algorithm is a two-step procedure: (1) the transport scheme, and (2) the antidiffusion scheme. The second step of the procedure could also be replaced by an application of the one-dimensional antidiffusion algorithm in the x direction and the y direction separately. The stability, phase shift errors and positivity for the fully two-dimensional transport scheme are analyzed. Test results are presented. The possibility of the extension of the FCT method to three dimensions are discussed.
    • A Geobotanical Analysis Of Circumpolar Arctic Vegetation, Climate, And Substrate

      Raynolds, Martha K. (2009)
      The objective of the research presented in this dissertation was to better understand the factors controlling the present and potential future distribution of arctic vegetation. The analysis compares the Circumpolar Arctic Vegetation Map (CAVM) with circumpolar data sets of environmental characteristics. Geographical information system (GIS) software was used to overlay the CAVM with a satellite index of vegetation (normalized difference vegetation index, NDVI) and environmental factors that are most important in controlling the distribution of arctic vegetation, including summer temperature, landscape age, precipitation, snow cover, substrate chemistry (pH and salinity), landscape type, elevation, permafrost characteristics, and distance to sea. Boosted regression tree analysis was used to determine the relative importance of different environmental characteristics for different vegetation types and for different regions. Results of this research include maps, charts and tables that summarize and display the spatial characteristics of arctic vegetation. The data for arctic land surface temperature and landscape age are especially important new resources for researchers. These results are available electronically, not only as summary data, but also as GIS data layers with a spatial context (www.arcticatlas.org). The results emphasize the value and reliability of NDVI for studying arctic vegetation. The relationship between NDVI and summer temperatures across the circumpolar arctic was similar to the correlated increases in NDVI and temperature seen over the time period of satellite records. Summaries of arctic biomass based on NDVI match those based on extrapolation from ground samples. The boosted regression tree analysis described ecological niches of arctic vegetation types, demonstrating the importance of summer temperatures and landscape age in controlling the distribution of arctic vegetation. As the world continues to focus on the Arctic as an area undergoing accelerated warming due to global climate change, results presented here from spatially explicit analysis of existing arctic vegetation and environmental characteristics can be used to better understand plant distribution patterns, evaluate change in the vegetation, and calibrate models of arctic vegetation and animal habitat.