• Zenith night sky light measurements at College, Alaska

      Wilcox, John B.; Kohls, Fred F.; Cronin, Harold (University of Alaska. Geophysical Institute., 1950-06-30)
      For purposes of studying the character of time fluxuations in arctic night sky brightness, we have erected a photoelectric monitory system at the Ballaine’s Lake Field Station (latitude N64°52', longitude W147°49'). The unit was set in operation September 27, 1949, and dismounted June 6, 1950, when it became evident that further observations would be impossible due to lengthening days. Although no apparatus has been available by which the response curves of phototubes could be calibrated absolutely, a standard by which bright ness recordings of different phototubes can be reduced to approximate absolute values has been evolved. A limited investigation of a possible correlation between fluxuations in the intensity of upper atmospheric emissions and sporadic conditions in the ionosphere has been made.
    • Zeolite deposits of possible economic significance on the northern Alaska Peninsula

      Madonna, J.A. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1982)
      Clinoptilolite, mordenite, haulandite and laumontite have been identified in possible economic concentrations on the Alaska Peninsula. Most important are 1) a haulandite bearing water-laid tuff on Agate Island, 2) a thick sequence of terrestrial volcanics containing mordenite and clinoptilolite located between Squirrel Point and Tommy Creek, 3) water-laid tuffs containing high concentrations of clinoptilolite near Dennis Creek and 4) a haulandite bearing siltstone at Chinitna Bay. Zeolite formation in the Iliamna Lake area was produced in "open" systems of fresh water lakes and ground water systems which have transformed vitric volcanic material into zeolites. Burial diagenesis is responsible for alteration of early formed, low temperature-pressure zeolites into high temperature-pressure varieties. The formation of laumontite in a tuffaceous sandstone at Chinitna Bay was the result of low grade burial metamorphism. The mode of formation of haulandite in a welded tuff and siltstone unit, also located at Chinitna Bay, appears to have resulted from diagensis alteration of terrestrial sediments. Transportation of zeolite ore from Iliamna Lake would be by lake to Pile Bay Village then by road to Iliamna Bay and, finally, by ship to the consumer. In the Chinitna Bay area ore can be loaded directly onto ships for transportation to the consumer.
    • Zinc oxide nanoparticles and SH-SY5Y cell line

      Zheng, Jinghui; 郑, 静慧; Duffy, Lawrence; Dunlap, Kriya; Drew, Kelly; Das, Debendra (2013-08)
      The Arctic and sub-arctic regions are impacted by the growth of the global nanotechnology industry. Nanomaterials have unique chemical and physical properties that may lead to toxicological effects that interfere with normal cellular metabolism. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are now very common and widely used in daily life. In industry, ZnO NPs are used to protect different materials from damage caused by UV exposure. The scientific literature suggests that ZnO NPs can have negative impacts on both living organisms and plants. However, there is a paucity of research on the mechanisms by which ZnO NPs may affect the neuronal cells. This study investigates how ZnO NPs interact with the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Using transmission electron microscopy, we observed that the ZnO NPs form 36 nm particles on average, and increase the level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in extracellular fluid, as measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Moreover, ZnO NPs, in presence of tumor neucrosis factor- α (TNF-α), can also decrease the level of extracellular VEGF compared with TNF-a treatment alone. These findings suggest the basis for more studies on understanding the mechanism by which ZnO NPs impact cytokine signaling. Another direction is using ELISA technology to observe the interactions of NPs with different cell types such as neuronal stem cells.
    • Zooplankton abundance, community structure, and oceanography northeast of Kodiak Island, Alaska

      Wang, Xian (2007-08)
      Zooplankton community dynamics and correlations with physical characteristics of the water were studied in the northwestern Gulf of Alaska. Zooplankton were collected systematically northeast of Kodiak Island, Alaska in March, May, August and November of 2002 to 2004. Species composition, total abundance and spatial community structure were correlated to physical variables. Small copepods (numerically>50%) dominated the zooplankton composition and were most abundant in August. Average biomass was 48.7 g WW m⁻² in May and 52.0 g WW m⁻² in August in Kodiak region. Interannual zooplankton abundance variations were large, with May 2003 having a dramatically higher abundance (2x10⁴ individual m⁻³ higher) than 2002 and 2004, probably due to the higher temperature (1° C higher) and lower salinity in May 2003. Small to moderate correlations (r<0.7) were found between temporal zooplankton abundance and selected physical variables. Spatial patterns in zooplankton composition among stations were more discernable in May than in August, likely due to water column stability in the spring and more dynamic influences in the summer, but revealed no consistent spatial patterns. The zooplankton community patterns in this region thus appear to arise due to complex oceanographic and bathymetric interactions, and suggest high variability can occur in the availability of prey for higher trophic levels.
    • Zooplankton ecology of Norton Sound, Alaska

      Neimark, Lee Michael (1979-12)
      The zooplankton distribution in Norton Sound was monitored for the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program. Salinity, temperature, and predation were investigated as factors controlling species composition and community structure. Sampling was concentrated along the eastern coast of Norton Sound during July and August, 1976. The copepod Acartia clausi and the cladocerans Evadne sp. and Podon sp. were numerically dominant in the samples. These species are able to tolerate the widely ranging salinities and temperatures of the coastal waters. The A. clausi population abundance was correlated with water temperature, while cladoceran and larval mollusc populations were correlated with salinity. No differences in species composition were discerned between stations along the shallow coast; however, the seaward community contained a greater diversity of organisms supporting a larger planktonic carnivore biomass. Zooplankton was a numerically dominant item in the diets of many fish species, although the epibenthic mysid community was volumetrically most important.