• International and domestic drivers of military shifts in Alaska

      Burkhart, Peter K.; Boylan, Brandon M.; Ehrlander, Mary F.; Speight, Jeremy S. (2018-05)
      Since WWII, Alaska has witnessed dramatic influxes and reductions in military personnel and funding. This thesis explores the drivers of these events. It applies two theories to analyze the trends: realist theory from international relations and the advocacy coalition framework from public policy. The thesis uses a case study framework and process-tracing to analyze three different time periods in Alaska's history: 1) World War II (1940-1945), 2) the early Cold War era (1950-1958), and 3) the immediate post-Cold War era (1993-1999). This thesis argues that the level of international threat accounts for the United States' decisions to increase or decrease its military forces, while the strength of advocacy coalitions comprised of a diverse array of actors determines the amount of military personnel and funding transferred to Alaska.