• Birds of the Upper Sheenjek Valley, Northeastern Alaska

      Kessel, Brina; Schaller, George B. (University of Alaska. Institute of Arctic Biology, 1960-05)
    • Faunal and lithic analyses from the Matcharak Peninsula site (AMR-00196) northern archaic context: Lake Matcharak, Central Brooks Range, Alaska

      Keeney, Joseph W.; Potter, Ben; Clark, Jamie; Reuther, Josh; Rasic, Jeff (2019-05)
      This thesis focuses on the Matcharak Peninsula site (AMR-00196 or MPS), located on the east side of Lake Matcharak in the upper Noatak River valley of Alaska's central Brooks Range. The MPS contains a substantial and well-preserved collection of faunal remains dating to between 6190±35 and 3780±35 14C years BP, along with side-notched projectile points and microblade technology. Radiometric dating and stone tools attribute the collection to the Northern Archaic tradition, making MPS unique for yielding the largest and most well-preserved collection of faunal remains reported from a Northern Archaic context to date. This project analyzed both faunal and lithic materials to identify a more robust suite of human behaviors, better assess post-depositional processes, and delineate between cultural components. This project first focuses on intrasite activities and site function within a larger system of land use, indicating that MPS functioned repeatedly throughout the middle Holocene as a short-term hunting camp and late-stage hunting tool repair location that was occupied between the late spring and early fall. A small number of individual caribou dominate the faunal assemblage, but a narrow range of other Brooks Range prey species are also present including Dall's sheep and locally available fish and Arctic ground squirrel. This project then develops broader interpretations about the Northern Archaic tradition, investigating technological, mobility, and subsistence strategies by mid-Holocene Brooks Range hunter-gatherers. The inhabitants practiced logistical mobility and organized special task groups when resources were leaner, and came together in aggregated communities to engage in communal hunts when caribou were reliably abundant. Lithic raw material use at MPS reflects a broader Northern Archaic trend of favoring less common obsidian for maintainable tool components, and more commonly available cherts for more heavily engineered and reliable implements such as inset-microblade weapons. Finally, this thesis explores side-notched and inset-microblade projectile weapon armatures in the context of hunting strategies at MPS and other sites, suggesting that bifacially-tipped projectiles were more effective at hunting medium-range targets while inset-microblades were designed for long-range strategies.
    • Plant succession in the Arctic Brooks Range: floristic patterns from alpine to foothills, along a glacial chronosequence and elevation gradient

      Kasanke, Shawnee A.; Walker, Donald A.; Chapin, F. Stuart III; Mann, Daniel H. (2019-08)
      In the wake of rapid glacial retreat, alpine habitats in the Arctic are expanding as freshly exposed surfaces become vegetated. Many glaciers in alpine cirques have nearly disappeared, and little is known about the rate of colonization or pioneer communities that develop following deglaciation. Newly developed habitats may provide refugia for sensitive Arctic flora and fauna, especially in light of polar warming. To assess this process, vegetation communities developing on two recently deglaciated moraines in the Central Brooks Range were surveyed and compared with communities along a transect spanning both a glacial chronosequence (40-125,000 years since deglaciation) and an elevation gradient (1700-500 m) into the Arctic foothills. Results show that primary succession begins almost immediately following deglaciation. Within forty years fine-grained and rock substrates hosted small communities of 8-13 vascular and nonvascular plant species. Many pioneer taxa, especially lichens, persist into later stages of succession. Overall succession is directional and slow, increasing in species richness for about 10,000 years, after which richness decreases and communities stabilize. This is the first vegetation study on primary succession in the high Central Brooks Range, providing a missing link to a vegetation transect along the Arctic Bioclimatic gradient.
    • Porphyry copper, copper skarn, and volcanogenic massive sulfide occurrences in the Chandalar copper district, Alaska

      Nicholson, Lisa; Keskinen, Mary (1990-05)
      Metamorphosed porphyry copper, copper skarn, and volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) occurrences have been found in 5 key prospects within Devonian rocks of the Chandalar copper district, Alaska. The Venus, Victor, Eva, and Evelyn Lee prospects contain "proximal" porphyry copper/copper skarn mineralization, whereas the Luna prospect contains "distal" Cu-Zn skarn and Cu-Zn VMS mineralization. Porphyry copper mineralization is recognized by granodiorite composition meta-intrusives; zoned potassic, sericitic and propylitic alteration; and del34S values of -1.5 to -0.6 per mil. Skarns consist of andraditic garnet (Ad30-100) and diopsidic pyroxene (Hd9-46), and have del34S values of -4.7 to -1.1 per mil. Alteration types in intrusive rocks and adjacent skarn are generally compatible. VMS occurrences contain chloritic and silicic alteration, and massive sulfides have del34S values of -0.8 to 6.9 per mil, consistent with values from known Devonian VMS deposits.
    • Studies on Alaskan Fishes

      Morrow, James E.; Frohne, Ivan V.; Voght, Kenneth D.; Vascotto, Gian L. (University of Alaska. Institute of Arctic Biology, 1973-10)
      A New Species of Salvelinus from the Brooks Range, Northern Alaska; Statistical Analyses of Discrete Morphology in Northern Populations of the Fish Genus Salvelinus; New Distributional Records of Liparids and Description of a New Species from Alaska; Behavior of the Arctic Grayling, Thymallus arcticus, in McManus Creek, Alaska