• Design of a micro-hydrokinetic electric power generation system

      Han, Rui (2011-08)
      The objective of this thesis project is to design a Micro-Hydrokinetic Power Generating (MHPG) system to generate electricity from sustainable and distributed hydrokinetic resources. The system is developed from a patent held by one of our team members, Robert Kallenberg. The MHPG does not require a dam or diversion, thus avoiding the negative environmental impacts associated with dams. The project could also help some communities to make use of their locally available hydrokinetic resources and significantly reduce their electricity costs. Reviewing of the literature in hydrokinetic electric power generation technology shows that hydrokinetic projects developed to date have largely made use of hydro turbine systems. These hydro turbines have a strong potential to cause fish mortality, while by design, the MHPG has little chance of causing mortality due to its gentle motion. On the other hand, the build-up of debris on a conventional hydro turbine can easily disable or even destroy the turbine, while the hydro foil in our device is generally oriented with the angle of attack less than 30 degree from the current, keeping debris build up at a minimum. The state of the art software COMSOL Multiphysics has been used as our numerical analysis tool. The interaction of water and the designed foil in a straight rectangular turbulent channel is modeled, explicitly, using two conservation laws: conservation of momentum and conservation of mass. The incompressible Navier-Stokes application mode in COMSOL Multiphysics has been used in this simulation to solve the distribution of the pressure and the velocity filed. Results show that the oscillating hydro foil has the potential to surpass the efficiency of a conventional turbine, and is deployable in relatively low velocity streams. Future project development suggestions will be presented focusing on further improvements electric machinery design and system integration. Finally, the prototype of the device has been fabricated and tested in natural rivers. The first test in Chena River, AK, verified the design by showing that the prototype can move in an oscillating manner. The second test in San Gabriel River, CA, shown that the designed Scotch Yoke, which was used to convert linear motion into rotational motion, could be efficiently integrated with the motion generation system. Future test work including permanent magnetic generator coupling and energy efficiency measurement need to be carefully studied concerning the system efficiency and maintenance.
    • Master's research project : transient migrations and responses to effective change for Mixtec indigenous youth

      Hennessey, Maura A.; Barnhardt, Ray; Gerlach, Craig; Ruppert, James (2014-04)
      This qualitative research was developed not knowing the outcome. The primary goal was to find an indigenous group that resided in the Monterey Bay region of the Central Coast of California. Thanks to the Pajaro Valley Unified School District's Migrant Education Office, this goal was accomplished by the introduction of the Mixtec culture of Oaxaca, in Southern Mexico. The research began by 'hanging out' with the Mixtecs at Adult Education English class building a trust and familiarity. Their primary language is Mixteco,. Lessons were in Spanish to learn English. The project all fell into place after being introduced to Lucia, a trilingual 25 yr. old Mixteca. The secondary goal was in understanding their environmental relationship to identity. Since the Mixtecs are immigrants it was necessary to 1) get acquainted with their history, and homeland 2) attempt to understand purpose and risks to 'sneak across the border' 3) adjustment to life in California. Eight interviews were performed. Seven interviews were in their native language, Mixteco. Lucia's interview was in English and Spanish. A hand held device recorded the interviews. All interview questions were formulated in a partnership with Lucia. The translations are composed genuinely from her indigenous perspective. To acquire first hand photos, three cameras were used by the informants as they worked 'on the job' in the agricultural fields. The interviewees from their personal files donated pictures of their Oaxacan villages. Common themes were identified and are summarized in this report. The data was collected and compiled. The research brought forth a narrative nonfiction, young adult book, requested by the Mixtec students, as the rest of this project lays it out.
    • She lives in Ohio

      Luft, Andrew; Kamerling, Leonard; Johnson, Sara; Harney, Eileen (2019-05)
      Before the big screen, before an actor reads, before the assembly of a set, and before the word "film" is even uttered, a screenplay is written. The successful screenplay acts as a blueprint, or dramatic instructions, for a team of filmmakers. This screenplay may evolve over time, shrinking and expanding to fit the unique vision of a director or producer; as it should. The screenwriter's job is to write a story that is strong enough to withstand this trial period between page and screen. While the minute details may change, the story beating at the screenplay's center should survive, unphased. If the writer is in control, the screenplay will demand to someday be made into a film. She Lives in Ohio is a screenplay of the coming-of-age genre, part drama and part comedy. The story follows Jess, a typical LA teenager, as she navigates changes in both her family structure and her natural surroundings. Jess is torn from the comfort of her mother's side and shipped out east to Ohio, where she and her older brother will spend the summer with their eccentric Aunt Carrie. What begins as a colorful nightmare, soon turns into an exploration of Jess's roots that reveals more about her identity than she ever could have anticipated. In keeping with the coming-of-age genre, She Lives in Ohio depicts a pivotal moment in the protagonist's life as she is thrust out of her youth and into the reality of adulthood. However, unlike the classic coming-of-age narrative, the screenplay does not rely on internal monologue or voice-over. Rather, the story punctuates dialogue with manicured action, snippets of Midwest culture, and portraits of hobbyists and artists. Each character has her practice, her own way of integrating into her environment, which shows how she copes with her given position. This variety of themes serves to reflect the screenwriter's own fascination with the social roles that we both seek and are assigned.