• Better Forage for Alaska's Dairy Industry with Particular Reference to the Matanuska Valley.

      Sweetman, W. J.; Brundage, A. L. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1960-07)
      Dairy farming is well adapted to Alaska's environment. Continued expansion of dairying supplements other primary economic growth and development. High quality grass hay and grass and oat-pea silage can be efficiently grown in Alaska's Matanuska and Tanana Valleys and in other favorable sites. These roughages, supplemented by locally grown grain, can supply most nutrients needed by Alaska's dairy industry. Much skill is needed to grow good roughage. This report summarizes the results of forage research conducted in Alaska since 1948, and interprets them in terms of farm practices.
    • Dairy Herd Improvement

      Sweetman, W. J. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1965-05)
      Milk and milk fat production have both been improved by crossing good Holstein or Red Dane bulls with Guernsey cows ( 1). The mature equivalent production ( M. E. ) for 365 days, 3 times milking of Holstein-Guernsey crosses is reported at 17,186 pounds of milk and 805 pounds of fat compared with their dams average of 10,897 pounds of milk and 555 pounds of fat. The Dane- Guernsey crosses averaged 18.149 pounds of milk and 803 pounds of fat as against their clams average of l].] 63 pounds of milk and 546 pounds of fat.