• Alaska Native females: understanding body image dissatisfaction in a culturally diverse country

      Naegele, Karaline M.; Cook, Christine; Renes, Susan; Harrison, Lynn (2013-05)
      The current study was conducted to expand literature on body image dissatisfaction (BID) in Alaska Native females. As BID has been a concern for European American females, and many minority groups in America, professionals should examine all cultural groups for the presence of BID. The research was comprised of qualitative interviewing methods. Interviews were conducted with Alaska Native female participants between the ages of 18 and 23 years, attending the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Research questions addressed whether or not Alaska Native females experience BID, and if so how BID develops and manifests for this population. The study found that all participants experienced BID beginning in adolescence. The development and manifestation of BID varied on an individual basis, reflecting other research findings.
    • An analysis of one community in the far north Simply Core Alaska: a case study beyond the studio

      Main, Emily Kathryn; Ehrlander, Mary F.; Cole, Terrence; Plumb, Veronica M. (2017-05)
      Alaska is a vast and starkly diverse land. One could argue that communities throughout the state share as many differences as similarities. Yet, each reflects humans' need for social interaction and our reliance on one another for physical, mental and emotional well-being. This project hypothesizes that here in the far north, family and community are particularly important to mental and emotional well-being. In a region where winters are long, cold and dark, and where individuals, especially non-Native Alaskans, often live far from their birth families and communities, we tend to form virtual families or communities to fulfill our need for close-knit social units. I hypothesize that one community in the far north, known as Simply Core Alaska serves as a family-community-like unit for Individuals. While Simply Core is a group fitness class, my hypothesis grew from my belief that it is more than an exercise class based on my own personal experiences as a transplant to Alaska. Simply Core Alaska reflects a frontier community culture wherein members warm up to one another quickly, accept one another regardless of fitness levels, and support one another through personal struggles. This Project explores Alaskans' need for community, considering the experiences of Indigenous individuals and transplants like myself. Chapter One, illustrates that from the beginning of time, community has been essential to the survival of Alaska Natives. Chapter Two introduces Melodee Morris, founder and creator of Simply Core Alaska's program of simultaneous physical and mental fitness. Chapter Three presents survey data from Core participants. The final chapters synthesize findings from interviews and spontaneous conversations with Core participants to analyze Simply Core Alaska's value and meaning both individually and collectively.
    • Barriers to graduation: an examination of first-generation college students

      Smith, Sarah M. (2012-08)
      The college experience of first- generation college students is unique in comparison to their peers. Many students do not have the support from their family and require help in the navigation of college life. Student Support Services, a federally funded TRIO program helps students successfully graduate with a bachelor's degree. Qualitative interviews were conducted on ten undergraduate students at UAF who were labeled as first-generation college students. All ten students were active participants in Student Support Services at the University of Alaska Fairbanks during the time of the interview. A thematic analysis produced six emergent themes. It was found that students utilized communicative strategies based on Orbe's co-cultural communication theory. First-generation college students, a non-dominant part of society, tried to negotiate through the University system, the dominant section of society. Through this negotiation, a co-cultural group was formed.
    • Birthing change: an ethnographic study of the Alaska Family Health & Birth Center in Fairbanks, Alaska

      Bennett, Danielle M. Redmond (2013-05)
      This study examines the practices of the Alaska Family Health & Birth Center in order to understand how midwives help clients navigate the process of pregnancy, birth, and the postpartum period with a high rate of success, as defined by a low cesarean rate, low mortality and morbidity, and high maternal satisfaction. How do the midwives prepare mothers to navigate the transformation and how do they address failure to progress during birth? This study analyzes birth as a rite of passage, which incorporates a culture's worldview and its practices. These outcomes are achieved by employing a positive, holistic view of the natural, physiological process, by using practices that support the physiological process and minimize intervention, and by keeping the space in which out-of hospital birth takes place. The fact that parents are choosing an alternative ritual for birth at an increasing rate nationwide reflects a change happening in American culture.
    • Bullying in middle school: the role of school counselors and teachers in preventing bullying

      Palmer, Paula Nicole; Topkok, Sean; Barnhardt, Ray; Roehl, Roy (2017-05)
      Research suggests that bullying is a problem in schools throughout the nation. Children spend the vast majority of their life attending school. School counselors and teachers are in a unique position to identify, prevent and educate students about bullying. The purpose of this project was to examine the role of school counselors and teachers in the Fairbanks North Star Borough School District (FNSBSD) in preventing bullying in their schools. The participants of this study were 8 school counselors and teachers from four middle schools in the FNSBSD. Data for this research was collected using an anonymous online survey utilizing www.SurveyMonkey.com. The results of the survey indicated that bullying is an issue in the four middle schools selected for the study in FNSBSD. Of the four major types of bullying discussed in my research (cyber, relation, physical, and verbal), there was a consensus among the participants that cyber and relational bullying were the most prevalent and problematic in their schools. Recommendations for future research include expanding on this study to include a larger sample of schools and participants, suggestions for strengthening staff training and implementing school based youth courts in FNSBSD schools as part of the bully intervention and prevention program.
    • Cofiring coal and biomass at Aurora Power Plant in Fairbanks, Alaska

      Wright, Zackery; Huang, Daisy; Nicholls, David; Peterson, Rorik; Schnabel, William (2016-05)
      Biomass energy has been a topic of great interest over the previous few years in Alaska; especially when various fuel sources were priced at a record high. Interior Alaska has the potential to utilize woody biomass to offset the use of coal in many of its power generating facilities. In this study, woody biomass in the form of clean aspen (Populus tremuloides) chips was cofired with Usibelli coal at the Aurora Power Plant facility in downtown Fairbanks, Alaska. Biomass was successfully cofired at low average rates of 2.4% and 4.81% of total energy value. Combustion gasses were analyzed using measuring probes in the exhaust stack. The 2.4% biomass test saw, on average, an increase in CO and CO₂ by 95ppm and 2%, respectively. A decrease in NOx of 1ppm was observed. During the 4.81% biomass test, CO increased by 83ppm, NOx decreased by 18ppm, and CO decreased by 1%. Opacity increased by 0.1% during the 2.4% biomass test and 0.17% during the 4.81% biomass test. The challenges facing a small scale facility in Interior Alaska are also presented. The testing exemplified that the use of biomass in stoker/grate boilers in Alaska is technically feasible with relative ease. No technical barriers to cofiring at low levels on an on-going basis were found at the Aurora Power Plant and this conclusion would likely hold true at similar facilities in interior Alaska.
    • Creating, communicating and measuring strategic objectives through the application of a balanced scorecard: the case of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Police Department

      McGee, Sean Eric; Duke, Rob; Berry, Kevin; May, Jeffrey (2015-08)
      This project served to align the vision and mission of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Police Department with the needs of the University community through the employment of a balanced scorecard. The balanced scorecard itself is a strategic performance management framework that enables organizations to identify, manage and measure strategic objectives. While there have been instances where police agencies have attempted to implement the balanced scorecard in the past, these police agencies have been very large, and they failed to achieve the level of granularity in their balanced scorecard necessary to effectively identify and manage true strategic objectives. In case of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Police Department, the balanced scorecard served to answer four fundamental questions: how will they sustain their ability to change and improve, what business processes must they excel at, how should they be perceived by their community, and how can they be responsible stewards of the funds that they are given?
    • Decadal scale vegetation maps for the boreal forest surrounding Fairbanks, Alaska

      Huhman, Hannah E.; Prakash, Anupma; Rosselló, Jordi Cristóbal; Dewitz, Jon (2018-08)
      Vegetation maps of a selected area within the boreal forest surrounding Fairbanks, Alaska, have been generated for the nominal years of 1985, 1995, 2005, and 2015 using Landsat 4 and 5 Thematic Mapper and Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager surface reflectance products at 30 meter spatial resolution using a decision tree classification. The maps include 9 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) vegetation classes, as well as barren land, open water, and ice/snow classes that are consistent with the classes identified in the 2001 National Land Cover Database (NLCD) map of Alaska generated by the USGS. Classification steps are based on USGS methodology, with refinements for the boreal forest, to ensure further comparison to the 2001 USGS NLCD map for Alaska. The overall weighted accuracies of first order estimates of data quality using cross validation are 93.2%, 88.4%, 93.3%, and 86.9% for the nominal years of 1985, 1995, 2005, and 2015 maps, respectively, compared to 81.8% accuracy for the USGS NLCD 2001 product. This study demonstrates that the spatial and spectral resolution of Landsat data is the best available for mapping the vegetation of Alaska's boreal forest at 1:50,000 scale. It also shows that the boreal forests surrounding Fairbanks, Alaska have witnessed a decrease in the growth of evergreen forests, an expansion of shrub and an increase in wetland distribution, all of which have been reported as impacts of a warming climate in the Arctic and Sub-arctic.
    • Diigwandak: stories from a Gwich'in language classroom

      Hayton, Allan; Siekmann, Sabine; Hishinlai', "Kathy R. Sikorski"; Marlow, Patrick (2013-05)
      This study describes a semester in an Indigenous language high school classroom during the spring of 2011. The goal of this research is to capture the experiences of a novice Indigenous language teacher, and his students. High and low points are shared as the researcher seeks to find his place in the work of Indigenous language revitalization, and students strive to learn a second language. Data for this qualitative research was collected through teacher auto-ethnographic journal entries, lesson plans, student journals and projects, exit interviews with students, and two recorded classroom observations. Emergent themes of Time, Responsibility, Community, Fluency, Emotions, and Self-Doubt capture significant moments in the classroom, and reveal close connections between teacher and student experiences. The purpose of conducting this research is to provide insights for novice Indigenous language teachers into their classroom dynamics. The researcher also discovered areas of possible future research for Indigenous language teaching and learning.
    • Do you know Title IX: a sexual assault navigation tool for college students

      Napolski, Jamie; Koskey, Michael; Drew, Elaine; McGee, Sean; Ramos, Judith (2017-05)
      This paper presents a Master's Project in Cross-Cultural Studies at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) that sought to understand Alaska Native and first-year (freshman) students beliefs and behaviors about the Title IX process at UAF. Title IX is a federal law which states that no individual in the United States shall be discriminated or excluded from participation, denied the benefits or subject to discrimination, based on their sex, within any educational program or activity that receives Federal financial assistance. This project undertook a mixed-method study utilizing a survey and focus groups to identify what information students are being provided regarding Title IX, how much students understand regarding their rights and resources, and ultimately to develop a practical tool to improve students' understanding and navigation of the Title IX process. The results of the focus groups and surveys are presented and discussed. The tool includes an explanation of remedies and also where to locate resources here at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.
    • Effects of diet quality and quantity on caribou and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus)

      Thompson, Daniel Paul; Barboza, Perry S.; Parker, Katherine L.; Kielland, Knut; Hundertmark, Kris J. (2013-05)
      Caribou and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) encounter natural and anthropogenic disturbances across the landscape. In late winter, Rangifer encounter acute food from disturbances such as icing events. Furthermore, as shrubs expand into the Arctic tundra, the proportion of low quality browse may increase in the summer diet of Rangifer. This study evaluated how Rangifer tolerate 1) fluctuations in food quantity in late winter and 2) changes in forage quality over the summer. Rangifer can compensate for food shortages by increasing intake after restriction, which would allow animals to restore body mass quickly during migration. High body fat reserves increase the tolerance of food shortages. During the summer, Rangifer can consume exclusively browse to meet daily energy requirements; however, low nitrogen supply and high toxin load would require the use of alternative forages to supplement nitrogen and reduce toxins.
    • Elmer E. Rasmuson Papers, 1898-2000

      Morris, Lisa M. (Archives and Manuscripts, Alaska and Polar Regions Collections, Elmer E. Rasmuson Library, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2005-12)
    • Enhancing the clinical supervision process for beginning mental health professionals

      Callahan, Adie; Gifford, Valerie; Renes, Susan; Simpson, Joni (2016)
      Using current research, this project discovers and compiles the pertinent information students need to know to successfully utilize supervision. Supervision was established as a field competency after the American Psychological Association's 2002 Multinational Competencies Conference. Since then, the mental health field has made strides in defining, standardizing, and evaluating the process of supervision. Students' awareness and ability to effectively use supervision is still gaining momentum, as the professionals in the field develop an infrastructure to train student development of knowledge, skills, and abilities related to the utilization of supervision. This project's application establishes a supplemental booklet for students in the University of Alaska Fairbanks School of Education's Counseling Program to use throughout supervision in practicum, internship, and as an early career mental health professional. Teaching students about supervision while they are in school sets the foundation for the developing competency of helping skills, delivering of quality client care, and becoming effective supervisors later in their careers.
    • Examining the feasibility of implementing a matrix model intensive outpatient program in a remote Alaskan setting

      Ponziano, Frank; Gifford, Valerie; Renes, Susan; McMorrow, Samantha (2015)
      Significance: The Matrix Model is possibly the only evidenced-based, intensive outpatient approach for addiction that has been shown to be effective at treating addiction. However, the model has not been evaluated for its effectiveness in remote Alaskan settings, such as Fairbanks, Alaska. Specific Aim: This study examined the feasibility of the Matrix Model compared to Treatment as Usual (TAU) in Fairbanks, Alaska. TAU is defined as any other outpatient substance abuse treatment (SAT) other than Matrix Model treatment program. The model's philosophy will be examined, and a method for determining its feasibility for implementation in Fairbanks, Alaska, will be outlined. This project will provide a method for an agency to examine their readiness and philosophical compatibility for the Matrix Model. This research intends to explore contextual variables, such as environment, culture, policy, participant barriers, funding, and organizational philosophy. Methods: This study has reviewed the literature regarding evidence-based, intensive outpatient programs, other treatment philosophies, and the contextual variables that affect program implementation in the literature. Moreover, this study provides an analysis of the Matrix Model versus TAU to help guide a Fairbanks agency considering Matrix Model Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP). IOP is a 12 to 16 week intensive outpatient SAT that meets for 9 or more hours per week that integrates individual, family, and group counseling along with weekly drugs screens. Implications: This project aims to contribute to the body of knowledge regarding the Matrix Models effectiveness compared to TAU in remote Alaskan settings.
    • The Fairbanks Four: hopeless innocence and the flawed system that escorted them to stagnant wrongful convictions

      Hill, Meghan (2014)
      This project explores factors that lead to wrongful convictions with a case study from 1997 on the sensitive claim of innocence on the Fairbanks, Alaska community: The John Hartman murder. As the representative model throughout the project, this sexual assault and murder case of the accused Fairbanks Four will be examined. Through a multi-disciplinary scope, the topic will be approached through numerous accounts of research, interviews, and field-work. By dissecting the Fairbanks Four case and applying it to the research of the burdensome appeals process, the supporting factors are apparent in the practices that lead to wrongful convictions. In the synopsis, methods that lead to convictions, as well as the inconsistent wavering time table, will be disclosed. Further, counter methods to tactics currently practiced and how to avoid time delays of such a rigorous and often hopeless process will also be included. With underdog defense organizations such as The Innocence Project and The Alaska Innocence Project growth and expansion, we increasingly see success in the overturn of wrongful convictions throughout the United States. This paper will argue and highlight the systemic faults in the current convictions process and identify recommendations to modify such faults in relation to the case study of the Fairbanks Four.
    • Fairbanks juvenile recidivism case study: a comparison of criminogenic needs and case planning of recidivists and non-recidivists

      Dompeling, Tracy A. (2015-08)
      Research has shown that addressing criminogenic needs of offenders, both juvenile and adult, can reduce the likelihood of recidivism. Utilizing the Risk Need Responsivity theory (Andrews, Bonta, & Hoge, 1990; Andrews, Zinger, et al., 1990), the hypothesis for this small case study of youth recidivist and non-recidivists in interior Alaska was developed to compare data to determine if what is identified in research models to reduce recidivism correlated to what was applied in practice with juvenile offenders. Specifically this comparative case study intended to show that youth who had case plans which were identified to be "inadequate," that they had fewer than 75% of the identified criminogenic needs from their YLS/CMI addressed on their case plan, would be more likely to recidivate. Further, youth who had case plans which were identified to be "adequate," that they had greater than 75% of their identified criminogenic needs from their YLS/CMI addressed on their case plan, would be less likely to recidivate.The case study also compared case plans of recidivists and non-recidivists in the use of dynamic criminogenic needs and any subsequent impact on recidivism. After the statistical analysis of both the efficacy of case plans addressing individual criminogenic needs as well as the efficacy of case plans addressing dynamic criminogenic needs and their impact on reduction of recidivism, only the later analysis of dynamic criminogenic needs was able to reject the null hypothesis; that inclusion of criminogenic needs on a case plan has no impact on recidivism.
    • Foster Parent Training for the Delivery of Independent Living Skills

      Alley, Kandy; Renes, Susan L.; Cook, Christine R.; Hutchison, Shayle (2013-12)
      Although training is made available to foster parents when they volunteer to share their homes with children in need, the required ten hours for single parents and fifteen hours for coupled parents does not provide enough training for foster parents who are working with youth preparing for independent living to give them the skills they need to succeed. There are many programs designed for youth, but fewer programs are readily available in Fairbanks, Alaska to teach foster parents how to deliver the skills to the youth. Youth leaving foster care continue to have lower outcomes in education, employment, housing, and fiscal management after exiting foster care than children who were raised in traditional homes. The outcome of this literature review is a pamphlet that will assist agencies in educating the parents of foster youth aging out of the foster care system. It will also provide quick access to resources and learning centers that offer training opportunities for foster parents working with youth preparing for independent living.
    • Geochemical-geophysical investigations, Fairbanks district

      Heiner, L.E.; Beistline, E.H.; Moody, D.W.; Thomas, B.I.; Wallis, J.E.; Loperfido, J.C.; Peterson, R.J.; Wolff, E.N. (University of Alaska Mineral Industry Research Laboratory, 1967)
      Trace element distribution in a subarctic valley in the Cleary Hill area of the Fairbanks gold district has been studied. Zinc and arsenic have been found excellent pathfinder elements for auriferous deposits. Methods of analysis for copper, lead, zinc, molybdenum, silver and arsenic as well as heavy metals are discussed. The University of Alaska method #2 has been improved, Terrain, slope, and frozen ground have little effect upon the distribution of trace elements associated with the Cleary H i l l vein. A new method for the determination of zinc using dilute acid is proposed. Analysis of geochemical data by trend surface procedures proved effective for localization of anomalies.
    • Gold and base metal mineralization of the Dolphin intrusion-related gold deposit, Fairbanks Mining District, Alaska

      Raymond, Luke M.; Newberry, Rainer; Larsen, Jessica; Keskinen, Mary (2018-08)
      The Dolphin deposit is an intrusion-related gold deposit (IRGD) located approximately 30 km north of Fairbanks, Alaska. The deposit is in--and adjacent to--a composite mid-Cretaceous pluton intruding amphibolite facies metamorphic rocks. An NI43-101 compliant gold resource estimation for the deposit (utilizing a 0.3 g/t cut-off grade) is 61.5 Million tonnes (Mt) at 0.69 g/t indicated (1.36 million oz = Moz) and 71.5 Mt at 0.69 g/t inferred (1.58 Moz). Due to extensive hydrothermal alteration of the intrusion, identifying rock types in hand sample and thin section, as well as by standard compositional techniques (e.g., SiO₂ vs. Na₂O + K₂O), has proven problematic. By plotting wt % TiO₂ vs. P₂O5 obtained from XRF analyses and four-acid digest ICP-MS data, two distinct population clusters appear. By comparison with least-altered intrusive rock analyses from the Fairbanks district, the igneous units were originally granite and tonalite. Because there is no gradational transition through an intermediate granodiorite unit, they were most likely derived from two separate magmatic bodies rather than in-situ fractionation from a single parent. Tonalite is concentrated along the northern and eastern margins of the stock with granite composing the rest of the body. Tonalite xenoliths in granite and granite dikes intruding tonalite prove that tonalite is the older unit. Investigations of hydrothermal alteration (based on chemical analyses, X-ray diffraction, and thin section examination) show albitic and advanced argillic (kaolinite-quartz) alteration are the dominant styles with sericite common throughout. Advanced argillic is a low temperature (<300°C) low pH alteration style that has not been previously identified in intrusion related gold deposits (IRGDs) in interior Alaska. Albitic alteration probably resulted from higher temperature, more neutral pH fluids. Gold investigations show that gold occurs as coarse-grained Au°, aurostibite, and maldonite in quartz + sulfide veins; fine-grained Au° in the oxide zone; and in many forms in disseminated sulfide. These forms include Au° inclusions in pyrite and arsenopyrite; solid-solution Au within compositionally zoned arsenopyrite; and as Au° nanoparticles in pyrite and probably arsenopyrite. Using UAF's JEOL JXA-8530F microprobe, I found that solid-solution gold occurs only in arsenopyrite with strong compositional zoning. Such grains are always small (< 0.2 mm) and commonly have low As cores; gold- bearing mantles with moderate % As; and higher As rims. In contrast, compositionally homogenous arsenopyrite does not contain detectable solid-solution gold. Pyrite is commonly arsenian and carries dissolved gold (if any) near detection limits. Gold mineralization has not been tied to any one lithology or alteration style; however, gold does seem to correlate with abrupt changes in alteration, especially between sericite + albite and kaolinite + sericite alteration. Gold-bearing, zoned arsenopyrite is predominantly associated with advanced argillic alteration and apparently represents a rapid growth, disequilibrium phenomenon.
    • Guide to the Mike Gravel Papers, 1957-1980

      Tabbert, Barbara M. (Alaska and Polar Regions Department, Elmer E. Rasmuson Library, University of Alaska - Fairbanks, 1986)