• Fescue Grasses Differ Greatly in Adaptation, Winter Hardiness, and Therefore Usefulness in Southcentral Alaska

      Klebesadel, Leslie J. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1993-03)
      This report summarizes agronomic research with several species of fescue (Festuca spp.) conducted over recent decades at the Matanuska Research Farm (61.6°N) near Palmer in southcentral Alaska. Cultivars and strains within five species of fescue from Alaska, Canada, the conterminous states, and Europe were evaluated for winter hardiness and for forage production in comparison with two standard, non-fescue forage cultivars. Certain aspects of physiological behavior associated with winter hardiness were compared in red fescue cultivars of diverse latitudinal adaptation.
    • Morphological, Physiological, and Winterhardiness Comparisons Among Latitudinal Ecotypes of Biennial Sweetclover (Melilotus species) in Subarctic Alaska

      Klebesadel, Leslie J. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1992-11)
      Objectives of this study were to compare, within two species of biennial sweetclover, several morphological and physiological characteristics of strains adapted to a wide range of latitudes and to relate those characteristics to winter survival and forage production in subarctic Alaska. All experiments were conducted at the University of Alaska’s Matanuska Research Farm (61.6°N) near Palmer in southcentral Alaska.
    • Seasonal Distribution of Forage Yield and Winter Hardiness of Grasses from Diverse Latitudinal Origins Harvested Four Times Per Year in Southcentral Alaska

      Klebesadel, Leslie J. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1992-06)
      Relatively short growing seasons at subarctic latitudes require maximum efficiencies in production of forages during the brief growing period. This is necessary to provide adequately for livestock feeding requirements both during the growing season and for preserved forages for use during the relatively longer infeeding period. As elsewhere, forages in Alaska are utilized in several ways; these include (a) usually two harvests per year for preservation as silage, haylage, or hay, (b) more frequent harvests for green-chop feeding, and (c) pasturing rotationally or continuously. Various crop species utilized for forage differ in growth characteristics as well as in their responses to various harvest procedures and schedules; therefore it is understandable that a number of species can be advantageously employed for forage production in Alaska, each to fulfill ideally one of the several ways that forages are utilized. Another limitation affecting forage production in the far north is the modest number of useful perennial legume and grass species and strains adequately winter- hardy to persist dependably under northern climatic constraints (Klebesadel 1970, 1971, 1985; Klebesadel et al. 1964; Wilton et al. 1966).